DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/25909398.14230

Publicado:

2019-01-01

Número:

Vol. 6 Núm. 6 (2019): Enero' Diciembre 2019

Sección:

Sección Central

Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación

Sensing Oneself Balancing: Dancing with Concepts as Research

Equilibrando: Dançando com Conceitos como Pesquisa

Autores/as

  • Joseph Dumit University of California Davis

Palabras clave:

balancing, contact improvisation, ideology, empirical philosophy (en).

Palabras clave:

senso de equilíbrio, contato de dança, ideologia, filosofia empírica (pt).

Palabras clave:

sentido del equilibrio, danza contacto, ideología, filosofía empírica (es).

Biografía del autor/a

Joseph Dumit, University of California Davis

Professor of Anthropology and Science and Technology Studies, University of California Davis

Referencias

Baloh, R. and Honrubia, V. (2011). Clinical neurophysiology of the vestibular system. Oxford: Oxford Universiy Press.

Bernard, A. Steinmuller, W and Stricker, U. eds. (2006). Ideokinesis: A creative approach to human movement and body alignment. 1 edition. Berkeley, Calif: North Atlantic Books.

Bjerre Jensen, D. (2018). Relational Fields – Touch and Relation in the Frame of Process Philosophy and Contact Improvisation. Thesis. The Danish National School of Performing Arts.

Bourdieu, P. (1977). Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Despret, V. (2016). What would animals say if we asked the right questions? B. Buchanan trans. 1 edition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Dumit, J, and O’Connor, K. (2016). Sciences and senses of fascia: A practice as research investigation, in L. Hunter, E. Krimmer, and P. Licht-enfels, eds. Sentient performativities of embodiment: Thinking alongside the human. Lanham: Lexington Books, 35–54.

Feldenkrais, M. (1981). The illusive obvious. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications.Fritz, S. (2016). Mosby’s fundamentals of therapeutic massag. –E-Book.

Elsevier Health Sciences.Ginsburg, C. (2010). The intelligence of moving bodies: A somatic view of life and its consequences. AWAREing Press.

Godard, H. (1994). Reading the Body in Dance. Rolf Lines 22(3), 36–41.

Goldman, D. (2010). I want to be ready: Improvised dance as a practice of freedom. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Gottschild, B. (2003). The black dancing body: A geography from coon to cool. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hennessey, J. (2016). Ambivalent Norms, Radical Potential: Contact Improvisation Re-Considered. Dissertation in Performance Studies, University of California Davis.

Little, N. and Dumit, J. (2018). Articulating presence: Attention is tactile, in Sarco-Thomas ed. Thinking touch, in partnering and contact improvisation, Malaika, Submitted.

Little, N. (2016). Enminded performance: Dancing with a horse, in L. Hunter, E. Krimmer, and P. Lichtenfels, eds. Sentient performativities of embodiment: Thinking alongside the human. Lanham: Lexington Books, 93–116.

Mol, A. (2003). The body multiple: Ontology in medical practice. Durham: Duke University Press. O’Connor, K. (2018). Mechanical Models, Bio-Tensegrity Models and Displacement: How Models Matter. Displacements. April 19th. The 2018 Biennial meetin of the society of cultural anthopology.

New York.Petitmengin, C. (Ed.) (2009). Ten years of viewing from within: The legacy of Francisco Varela. Exeter: Imprint Academic.

Phillips, A. (1994). On kissing, tickling, and being bored: Psychoanalytic essays on the unexamined life. 1st edition. Cambridge (Mass.): Harvard University Press.

Schaffman, K. (2001). From the margins to the mainstream: Contact improvisation and the commodification of touch. PhD Thesis, Univer-sity of California, Riverside.Stewart, K. (2017). Mattering compositions, in B. Gretchen and M. Peterson, eds. Between matter and method: Encounters In anthropolo-gy and art. M. Bloomsbury Academic, 45–67.

Sweigard, E. (2017). Human movement potential: Its ideokinetic facilitation. s. l.: Allegro Editions.Todd, M. (2013). The thinking body. Martino Fine Books.Wynter, S. and McKittrick, K. (2015). Unparalleled catastrophe for our species? Or, to give humanness a different future: Conversations, in K. McKittric, ed. Sylvia Wynter: On being human as praxis. Durham: Duke University Press, 34–53.

Cómo citar

APA

Dumit, J. (2019). Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación. Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos, 6(6), 88–107. https://doi.org/10.14483/25909398.14230

ACM

[1]
Dumit, J. 2019. Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación. Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos. 6, 6 (ene. 2019), 88–107. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/25909398.14230.

ACS

(1)
Dumit, J. Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación. corpo graf. 2019, 6, 88-107.

ABNT

DUMIT, J. Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación. Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos, [S. l.], v. 6, n. 6, p. 88–107, 2019. DOI: 10.14483/25909398.14230. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/CORPO/article/view/14230. Acesso em: 6 jul. 2022.

Chicago

Dumit, Joseph. 2019. «Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación». Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos 6 (6):88-107. https://doi.org/10.14483/25909398.14230.

Harvard

Dumit, J. (2019) «Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación», Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos, 6(6), pp. 88–107. doi: 10.14483/25909398.14230.

IEEE

[1]
J. Dumit, «Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación», corpo graf., vol. 6, n.º 6, pp. 88–107, ene. 2019.

MLA

Dumit, J. «Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación». Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos, vol. 6, n.º 6, enero de 2019, pp. 88-107, doi:10.14483/25909398.14230.

Turabian

Dumit, Joseph. «Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación». Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos 6, no. 6 (enero 1, 2019): 88–107. Accedido julio 6, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/CORPO/article/view/14230.

Vancouver

1.
Dumit J. Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación. corpo graf. [Internet]. 1 de enero de 2019 [citado 6 de julio de 2022];6(6):88-107. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/CORPO/article/view/14230

Descargar cita

Visitas

261

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.
Equilibrando

Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación*

Sensing Oneself Balancing: Dancing with Concepts as Research

Equilibrando: Dançando com Conceitos como Pesquisa

 

 

Joseph Dumit**

Professor of Anthropology and Science and Technology Studies, University of California Davis Correo electrónico: jpdumit@ucdavis.edu


Revista Corpo-grafías: Estudios críticos de y desde los cuerpos / Volumen 6 – Número 6 / Enero – diciembre de 2019 / ISSN impreso 2390-0288, ISSN digital 2590-9398 / Bogotá, D.C., Colombia / 88-107.


Fecha de aceptacíon: 26 de agosto de 2018

Doi: https://doi.org/10.14483/25909398.14230

Cómo citar este artículo: Dumit, J. (2019). Equilibrándose: Danzar con Conceptos como Investigación. Corpo Grafías Estudios críticos De Y Desde Los Cuerpos, 6(6), 88-107. https://doi.org/10.14483/25909398.14230


*Artículo de investigación: Aprendiendo con el Contact (danza contacto), podemos atender y observar cómo nos mantenemos erguidos, y cómo esta posición puede llegar a experimentarse como un constante perder el equilibrio para volver a recobrarlo.

Learning from the dance form Contact Improvisation, we can attend to how we stand, and how standing can come to be experienced as repeatedly slightly falling off-balance and catching yourself.**Chair of Performance Studies, and professor of Science & Technology Studies, and of Anthropology at University of California Davis. He is an anthropologist of passions, brains, games, bodies, drugs and facts. His research and teaching constantly ask how exactly we came to think, do and speak the way we do about ourselves and our world; and what are the actual material ways in which we come to encounter facts, conspiracies, and things and take them to be relevant to our lives and our futures? He is the author of Picturing Personhood: Brain Scans & Biomedical America (Princeton 2004), Drugs for Life: How Pharmaceutical Companies Define Our Health (Duke 2012). His current research includes comparative anatomies and fascia via movement practice as research, a book on playing with methods, and creating an undergraduate program in Data Studies, helping undergrads learn to think critically and computationally about data. http://dumit.net


 

Resumen

En el interior mismo del poder normativo del concepto de ‘equilibrio’, reciden sus múltiples capas material-semióticas. Las cuales nos invitan a entenderlo como la idea transformadora de un tipo ideal de movimiento. La manera en que “nosotros” aprendemos e incorporamos el concepto-práctica del equilibrio da forma a nuestro mundo-vida en términos políticos, his- tóricos, gimnásticos y prácticos. Así, entonces, comprendemos el equilibrio como una forma de ofuscación o ideología que está en el centro de la manera cómo vivimos nuestras vidas en sociedad. En gran parte, hemos colaborado con este aparato ideológico por la forma en que nos entendemos a nosotros mismos como cuerpos-mentes que se equilibran. Con todo, no es el punto oponer el concepto a la práctica: los conceptos también son la práctica-como-investigación, tanto de manera baladí como profunda. Por su parte, la biología también está habitada por metáforas en movimiento, un sistema viviente receptivo que requiere la perspectiva de la práctica-como-investigación. Aprendiendo con el Contact (danza contacto), podemos atender a la postura denominada ‘The Stand’ (quedarse de pie), y observar como nos mantenemos erguidos, y cómo esta posición puede llegar a experimentarse como un constante perder el equilibrio para volver a recobrarlo. En la presente investigación, al pedirle a las personas que hagan algo atentamente, se ha evidenciado como estas se ven movi- das por los conceptos o metáforas que las habitan, y como al moverse de manera diferente, las metáforas pueden llegar a cambiar. Bailar con conceptos es un tipo de filosofía empírica. Así, encontramos más maneras de quedarnos quietos, descubriendo toda la gama de posibilidades implicadas en el concepto del equilibrio. Las metáforas de la quietud se mul- tiplican, como también los detalles del concepto. A través de este vocabulario vivo, podemos convertirnos en pensadores con nuestros cuerpos. En la práctica-como-investigación, descubrimos no lo que es un concepto, sino lo que éste puede hacer, en este momento, y luego, en otro momento, una vez más.


Palabras claves: sentido del equilibrio; danza contacto; ideología; filosofía empírica.

Abstract

Inside of the norming power of “balance” as a concept, lies the layering of balance as a moving-idea of ideal-movement. How “we” learn and incorporate the concept-practice of balancing gives shape to our lifeworld in political, historical, gym- nastic and practical ways. Balance as a form of obfuscation or ideology that is at the core of how we live our lives in society. One aided in no small part by how we understand ourselves as bodyminds who balance. But opposing concept to practice misses the point: concepts are also practice as research, in both mundane and profound ways. Biology too is inhabited by metaphors in motion, a living responsive system that requires practice as research. Learning from the dance form Contact Improvisation, we can attend to ‘The Stand’, how we stand, and how standing can come to be experienced as repeatedly slightly falling off-balance and catching yourself. In asking people to do something attentively, they find themselves moved by the concepts or metaphors that inhabit them, and as they move differently, the metaphors can shift. Dancing with con- cepts is a type of empirical philosophy. We can become still in more ways, and I find more in the concept, the metaphors of stillness multiply. Through this living vocabulary, we can become a thinkers with our bodies. In practice as research, we discover not what a concept is, but what this concept can do, now, and then now again.


Keywords: balancing; contact improvisation; ideology; empirical philosophy.


Resumo

Dentro do próprio poder normativo do conceito de “equilíbrio”, eles recitam suas múltiplas camadas material-semióticas. O que nos convida a entendê-lo como a ideia transformadora de um tipo ideal de movimento. Como “nós” aprender e incor- porar o conceito ea prática de equilíbrio molda os nossos termos políticos, históricos, ginástica e práticas mundiais de vida. Então, entendemos o equilíbrio como uma forma de ofuscação ou ideologia que está no centro de como vivemos nossas vidas na sociedade. Em grande parte, temos colaborado com esse aparato ideológico pela maneira como nos entendemos como corpo-mente que equilibra. No entanto, não é o ponto de opor-se ao conceito em prática: conceitos são também uma prática-as-a pesquisa, tanto maneira trivial e profundo. Enquanto isso, biologia também é habitada por metáforas em movimento um sistema vivo receptivo que exige a perspectiva da prática-como-pesquisa. Aprender com contato (contato dança), que pode servir para a posição chamada ‘The Stand’ (para ficar) e ver como podemos ficar de pé, e como esta posição pode vir a ser experimentado como um equilíbrio perdedor constante para recuperá-la novamente. No presente inquérito, pedir às pessoas para fazer algo com cuidado, tornou-se evidente como é que você se moveu pelos conceitos ou metáforas que os habitam são, e como se mover de forma diferente, metáforas pode mesmo mudar. Dançar com con- ceitos é um tipo de filosofia empírica. Assim, encontramos mais maneiras de ficar parado, descobrindo toda a gama de possibilidades envolvidas no conceito de equilíbrio. As metáforas da quietude se multiplicam, assim como os detalhes do conceito. Através deste vocabulário vivo, podemos nos tornar pensadores com nossos corpos. Na prática-como-pesquisa, descobrimos não o que um conceito, mas o que pode fazer, neste momento, e depois, mais uma vez.


Palavras-chave: senso de equilíbrio; contato de dança; ideologia; filosofia empírica.


Versión en español (Traducido por Juan Camilo Cajigas-Rotundo)


Mientras lees estas líneas, trata de mantenerte equilibrado. Bien puedes sentarte erguido, o quedarte de pie.


Estando quieto y en equilibrio… incluso si te desplomas, o te apoyas en algo, puedes notar como es de facil convencerse de que te encuentras en una posición estable. Pero, incluso en ese momento, si observas atenta y minuciosamente, encontrarás que sigue habiendo movimiento, una pequeña danza. Si extiendes un brazo lenta y suavemente, encontrarás que todos tus músculos anticipan dinámicamente este movimiento (empezando por el pie opuesto). No puedes detenerlo, literalmente. Cada gesto que realizas te desequilibra, haciendo que todo tu cuerpo–que a la vez es un sólo músculo- responda, o de lo contrario caerías. Y ‘responder’ es una forma de hablar, ya que esta expresión implica que hay un determinado gesto que comienza el despliegue del movimiento, y otros que en consecuencia le siguen. Pero en realidad, el gesto inicial se da en un adentro complejo: dentro de tu cerebro, dentro de tu columna vertebral, al interior de tus músculos y con toda tu fascia – tejido conectivo – como también al interior de tu sistema vestibular de equilibrio. Este gesto inicial es, entonces, parte de la emergencia de una postura en tanto proceso anticipado y abierto, el cual es generado desde el interior de la danza de los músculos. Así, incluso el gesto más pequeño como el que uno hace cuando voltea los ojos, llega a sentirse como un actuar de todo el cuerpo. Sin embargo, este hecho particular puede ser postergado para otra conversación (pero, intenta despasio!). Pero, ¿es bueno el sentido del equilibrio? ¿Hay alguna forma en que no lo sea? El ‘equilibrio’ es a menudo entendido como un estado afectivo, un sustantivo neutro de caracter positivo, o también como un operador de cuantificación. Dos (o más) cosas se hacen equivalentes a partir de una cierta dimensión de medida. Y, por supuesto, esto no es simple en la práctica, ya que al igual que en el caso del cerebro en ‘estado de equilibrio’ o de la ‘dieta equilibrada’, sus efectos sólo pueden ser percibidos de manera retroactiva. Haz el ejercicio de calcular o dictar qué es lo ‘bueno’ o lo ‘bien’ que comen, o tienen, las personas sanas; y luego fíjate en el ejercicio de dictaminar cómo se deban equilibrar esas proporciones. Por razones que explicaré más adelante, lo anterior nos incita a pensar que el equilibrarse, en tanto actividad psicosomática, hace que ciertos afectos circulen en los objetos.

Este concepto o imagen del equilibrio es terriblemente reduccionista, ya que simplifica cosas tan dicímiles como los alimentos o tu actividad cerebral a un conjunto de categorías genéricas. A las personas también se las clasifica bajo determinados tipos: humanos, con género, racializados, estratificados según una clase social, y estandarizados según un índice de masa corporal (IMC). Esta imagen del equilibrio idealmente reducido informa la manera en que pensamos e imaginamos el mundo. Esta noción de equilibrio forma parte de un “género de humanidad” universalizado – en palabras de Sylvia Wynter – (Wynter, 2015), que biosocialmente constituye el pensamiento, las prácticas y la sociedad en términos coloniales, capitalistas, racistas, nutricionales, médicos, biológicos y de entretenimiento. Hacer la cartografía del equilibrio como concepto comienza con el seguimiento de los procesos a través de los cuales las personas producen las prácticas relativas al equilibrio: equilibrio en términos comerciales, equilibrio de poder, equilibrio entre la vida y el trabajo, equilibrio como metáfora y práctica. O también, el equilibrio como una forma de ofuscación o ideología que determina la manera como vivimos nuestras vidas en la sociedad. En este sentido, la forma en que nos auto-comprendemos como cuerpos-mentes que se equilibran, termina por hacer que colaboremos sustancialmente en este proceso ideológico.Sin embargo, no es adecuado oponer la conceptualización a la práctica: los conceptos son también una práctica- como-investigación, tanto de manera prosaica como profunda. Cada uso de un concepto, cada pronunciación de una palabra, es una adaptación, una improvisación, que se desplaza a sí misma (un poco). Cada concepto tiene su propia forma de atención, su propio modo de presenciar, su propio devenir. Cada concepto, por lo tanto, ayuda a formar una vida, y cada concepto genera sus mundos. La práctica-como-investigación implica en este caso moverse con los conceptos, fisicalizarlos a través del ejercicio de su práctica, atendiendo a cómo se los coloca en una relación de variación continúa (vease O’Connor en este número). Y no hay práctica que no involucre sus propios conceptos; éstos son en sí mismos las diferencias desveladas.

Y, ¿cuál es la relevancia del sentido del equilibrio? Wikipedia describe la sensación de equilibrio o equilibriocepción como uno de los sentidos fisiológicos que ayuda a evitar que los humanos y los animales se caigan al estar de pie o en movimiento. Esta descripción nos hace pensar que el problema es el caerse, y la estabilidad se presenta como la solución. Ser equilibrado se convierte en un estado, algo que se debe lograr, un ideal e incluso una norma personal. En cierta ocasión, cuando estaba enseñando una clase de caminar en la cuerda floja en el año 2016, muchos de nuestros estudiantes vivenciaron este tipo de normatividad:


“Yo entiendo el equilibrio como sinónimo de control. Cuando afirmo que me siento equilibrado, realmente estoy diciendo que siento el control de mi cuerpo, mis movimientos, mis pensamientos, que estoy enfocado. El equilibrio es un estado de ánimo en el que siento que me esfuerzo constantemente para…”


El apredender a caminar en la cuerda floja, nos reveló que el equilibrio no es un sustantivo, sino un verbo, deberíamos decir ‘equilibrándose’, ya que el estado de equilibrio es a la vez una práctica y un proceso. Incluso cuando los estudiantes aprendieron a caminar por la cuerda floja, nunca lograron equilibrarse completamente.

Comencé a enseñar conjuntamente esta clase de la cuerda floja porque en los últimos seis años, me he introducido en la comunidad de contact (danza contacto) –una forma de movimiento colectiva en la que se coloca especial énfasis en el compartir el peso del cuerpo, y en el improvisar como una forma de experimentar con nuestros hábitos.1 Estaba y, sigo estando, fascinado con lo que los bailarines de contact llaman ‘laboratorios’. En la mayoría de las clases y talleres que he tomado, los profesores nos comparten sus intereses y descubrimientos del momento. El enseñar en este contexto no consiste en pasar información o conocimiento de un experto a un no-experto, sino en embarcarse en un viaje conjunto atravesando el umbral de lo que el profesor conoce. La vitalidad de esta aproximación es inmediatamente sentida y genera una comunidad dedicada a percibir lo que pueda pasar. En este caso, el estudio de danza se convierte en lo que Francisco Varela refería como el laboratorio andante (aunque en realidad, él se refería a las prácticas de atención plena –meditación –).

Quedarse parado (the Stand) es una práctica o pauta improvisacional de movimiento originada al inicio del contact; fue creada por Steve Paxton (co-fundador de esta danza) alrededor de 1977. En ella, usted simplemente se queda de pie. Los pies se posicionan alineados debajo de los hombros, las rodillas ligeramente dobladas y, generalmente, se cierran los ojos. En la medida en que usted lo hace, con el paso del tiempo, se puede tomar conciencia de los pequeños movimientos y gestos de su cuerpo, como también de las partes que se aquietan, y las que se tensan, cambian, o fluyen. Pruebe esto durante al menos cinco minutos. Lo más probable es que empiece a aburrirse, sin embargo, el aburrimiento es la oportunidad de encontrar lo que le interesa: “El aburrimiento es esencial en el proceso de aprender a ‘tomarse el tiempo’ “. (Phillips trabajando con Winnicott) (Phillips, 1994).>Mantenerse de pie, puede experimentarse como un constante caerse desde el cual se retoma el equilibrio. Esta descripción hace que la noción de Wikipedia del equilibrio anteriormente referida, sea mejor entendida como una serie continua de caídas y recuperaciones, algo así como una caida controlada. onforme se lo práctica de manera más prolongada – y de hecho la presente conversación debería ser un taller de dos horas – el quedarse de pie, se transforma a menudo en una experiencia de lo que Paxton llama “La pequeña danza”. En ésta quedarse de pie es experimentado como un estarse-cayendo-continuamente – cayendo hacia arriba tanto como hacia abajo. En este caso, se reinventan y experimentan dos cosas: equilibrarse como caer, y, el caer experimentado como algo negativo solo si no sabes qué hacer a continuación, o no te puedes ajustar al siguiente movimiento, o simplemente no quieres hacerlo. Así entonces, el contact se convierte en un entrenamiento para aprender a caer creativamente. Si cae, cae bien. Aunque soy antropólogo, también me estoy acercando a estos laboratorios en tanto investigación científica. Me considero parte de una extensa red de práctica-transdisciplinaria-como-investigación que involucra a bailarines y artistas corporales, quienes a partir de la improvisación realizan experimentos corporomentales. Dichos experimentos buscan cuestionar cómo es posible cambiar las capacidades y las experiencias de los participantes (por ejemplo, el IMC, Labodance, Freiburg, ModLab). Estos investigadores están tan interesados en convertirse en mejores artistas corporales e improvisadores, como en obtener algún tipo de conocimiento in-corpóreo. Lo cual es un paradigma de investigación que incluye y valida las perspectivas en primera persona, en el contexto de lo que queramos definir como objetividad (Petitmengin, 2009).

A la manera de una pequeña danza, el quedarse de pie se ha ejecutado como un laboratorio de forma continua durante 40 años. Lo he encontrado al menos en una quinta parte de los 200 laboratorios y talleres a los que he asistido en los últimos seis años. Una razón clave es que esta posición proporciona un sitio relativamente tranquilo para ser conscientedel cuerpo y la mente, y notar tanto lo inseparables que son como cuán compleja es nuestra propiocepción. Al pedirle a las personas en los talleres que enfoquen su atención en el movimiento que realizan, nos fijamos cómo se dan cuenta de que se se mueven guiadas por los conceptos o las metáforas que los habitan; y en la medida en que se mueven de manera diferente, estas metáforas también pueden cambiar. Entonces, bailar con las metáforas incorporadas se convierte en una forma de práctica-como-investigación. Kevin O’Connor (2018) también ha notado cuán importante es trabajar con diferentes grupos de personas. La gente insunfla a las metáforas con sus propias vidas; al fijarnos en esto nos damos cuenta que ninguna metáfora está muerta; todas las metáforas nos con-mueven. La estabilidad aparente de una metáfora, un concepto o una forma de atención es el efecto de un mundo que nos normaliza.

Una frase que aprendí de Annamarie Mol es: ‘bailar con conceptos es un tipo de filosofía empírica’. (Mol, 2003). En este sentido, es posible seguir el uso que diferentes personas hacen de un concepto. Es posible, también, probar cómo se despliega un concepto a través del movimiento: ‘me dicen que esté quieto’. Encuentro así que puedo quedarme aún más quieto, que con el tiempo y con la práctica, hay otras formas de experimentar el estado de quietud. En consecuencia, mis nociones de quietud, el imaginario de mi yo en estado de inmovilidad, y mis formas de atención a la quietud se ponen en variación. Puedo quedarme quieto de más maneras, y encuentro más nociones implicadas en este concepto: las metáforas de la quietud se multiplican. A través de este vocabulario vivo, me he convertido en un pensador-con-mi-cuerpo (Bjerre, 2018). Cuando alguien más habla de un objeto en reposo, me pregunto, ¿qué tipo de quietud habita ese reposar? Según el sentido común de mis estudiantes el equilibrio se opone a la gravedad. Incluso, los diccionarios médicos llegan a denominar un cierto grupo de músculos como ‘antigravedad’, debido al rol que juegan al “estabilizar las articulaciones, oponiéndose a los efectos de la gravedad” (Fritz, 2016) En general, los investigadores no están de acuerdo sobre cuáles son los músculos que caben bajo esta denominación, pero suelen incluir los de la mandíbula, ya que de lo contrario ésta se abriría. La trampa de este lenguaje y las consiguientes imágenes corporales que mobiliza es que nos refuerza y nos entrena para percibir el esfuerzo que se genera al subir el cuerpo y el relajamiento implicado en el colapso del descenso. Estabilización hacia arriba y desestabilización hacia abajo. Y, al igual que la noción de desequilibrio cerebral, ésta imagen funciona; nos hace poder funcionar de esta manera. Vale la pena mencionar que existe un área de investigación denominada ideokinesis, la cual estudia como las imágenes anatómicas moldean nuestro movimiento (Todd, 2017). Debido a que durante los ultimos veinte años me he dedicado a la actividad académica, mis movimientos corporales se redujeron a estar sentado y caminar. Esto hizo que en los primeros tres meses de practicar contact, me la pasara sintiendo el movimiento hacia abajo como un caerse, y por tanto, el caerse como algo que me producía miedo –hastael punto incluso de que estos movimientos hacia abajo no eran para nada conscientes. Yo solo me caía: había una sensación de equilibrio, y de repente desaparecía, y luego me caía, y sentía pánico al pegarme contra el piso sin ni siquiera realmente darme cuenta de estos movimientos. La mayoría del tiempo yo tenía los ojos cerrados. Al final, yo sabía qué era lo que iba a pasar; ¿qué necesidad había de obsevar todo esto? Con todo, mi sistema de movimiento funcionaba bien, aunque yo estuviera lleno de moretones.Comprender todo lo que hacía cuando me estaba cayendo llegó a ser bastante raro: además de cerrar mis ojos, estaba tensionando involuntariamente muchos músculos, engarrotándome, apretando los dientes, no prestando atención a lo que mis compañeros de práctica estaban haciendo, creando historias acerca de mi trayectoria, quejándome diciendo que soy muy viejo y torpe, y que nunca lo voy a lograr, etc. Más extraño aún fue el darme cuenta del poco entrenamiento que tengo en el arte de aprender a caerse. En el pasado, me han enseñado a pararme, a equilibrarme, a caminar y a montar una bicicleta, pero nunca me habían enseñado cómo caerse. Ahora sé que esas cosas se le enseñan a los bailarines, a los atletas, y a los artistas marciales. Sin embargo, ellos lo hacen en contextos muy específicos: ellos examinan, por ejemplo, cómo caerse en esta superficie desde este tipo de lanzamiento.

Aprender a vivenciar el estar de pie como la danza de un cierto caerse permanente –una danza que siempre he estado haciendo – fue, en últimas, aprender a prestar atención a mi propia forma de atender.

Al caer de esta manera uno se siente siempre muy vulnerable. En este sentido, el contact es, en muchos aspectos, lo opuesto a las artes marciales. En esta clase de práctica se busca disimular la verdadera intención, mantener el centro de gravedad del cuerpo fuera del alcance del contendor, y moverse más rápido sin que éste se de cuenta. En cambio, en el contact, con el objeto de jugar, le das a tu(s) pareja(s) tu centro de gravedad. Les brindas la mayor cantidad posible de información sobre tu cuerpo, a la vez que los escuchas y atiendes a lo que necesitan saber. Lo cual implica confiar en ellos, aunque sin abandonarte totalmente. En principio, lo ideal es que ninguno de los dos sepa qué sucederá a continuación, estando siempre listos para caer. Los coreógrafos, Martin Keogh y Neige Christenson, lo llaman “el juego del peso”.

Con el paso del tiempo, los practicantes de la cuerda floja en nuestra clase tuvieron cambios similares en su experiencia. La estudiante Courtney King escribió: “ Desafié a la cuerda floja a un duelo, como un payaso torpe, en lugar de pedirle que bailara. Al principio no entendí que no se trataba de un acto de conquista. Simplemente, necesitaba familiarizarme lo suficiente con la cuerda para que se sintiera cómoda diciéndome sus secretos.”. Otro estudiante dijo: “Hasta la tercera semana de clases, empecé a desarrollar una relación íntima con la cuerda”.


“Al prestar atención, a la sensación que un movimiento produce en las articulaciones, en mi piel, y en mi fascia – tejido conectivo – [podemos desarrollar nuestros propioceptores, y enfocar su labor en areas que normalmente están inactivas.”. (Godard, 1994, 41).


En la práctica-como-investigación, descubrimos no tanto lo que un concepto es, o cómo se define, sino que prestamos atención a lo que el concepto puede hacer, en el momento presente, y luego en otro momento, una vez más. El preguntarse qué puede hacer un concepto, una metáfora o una práctica es una forma de cuestionar que Gille Deleuze aprendió de Espinoza: se trata de formular una pregunta abierta cuya respuesta se desvela siempre y cuando se abran más cuestionamientos. La filósofa Vinciane Despret (2016) afirmó que la investigación depende del generar las preguntas correctas, es decir, preguntas lo suficientemente abiertas que nos permitan poner en variación continua a las posibles respuestas. Si estamos dispuestos a pensar heurísticamente, podemos notar cómo la ciencia hace preguntas con base en la siguiente forma: “Me pregunto si ¿es este el caso?”; en cambio, la filosofía se pregunta “Me pregunto ¿qué significa esto?”, y el arte, y en especial la investigación sobre la danza, preguntan: “¿Qué sucede si vuelvo a hacer esto? En este caso, el hacer mismo y quien hace – preguntando son transformados por el método de práctica – como-investigación.

Así las cosas, ¿Cómo nos sentimos cuando estamos equilibrándonos? Para poder responder a esta pregunta podemos recurrir al mundo de la biología del oido. En este, entramos en el extraño espacio-tiempo de las vibraciones acústicas, líquidos gelatinosos, laberintos de vellocidades viscosas, y desfases temporales. La misma arquitectura que transduce las vibraciones del aire en sonido, es también la que adapta nuestras cabezas flotantes – apoyadas en cuerpos ondulados – a un compromiso activo con un mundo inestable. De hecho, el sentido de orientación de la cabeza es estimulado por medio del movimiento del fluido viscoso llamado endolinfa. “La endolinfa sigue la rotación del canal, sin embargo, debido a la inercia se retrasa inicialmente, lo que dobla y activa la cúpula. Después de cualquier rotación prolongada, la endolinfa alcanza el canal y la cúpula vuelve a su posición vertical y se restablece “(Bernard, Steinmuller and Stricker 2006).

La estructura del oído interno utiliza una capa de gel compuesta de piedras – otolitos – los cuales operan como mecanismos encargados de controlar la gravedad, el sentido del equilibrio, y el movimiento, además de ser indicadores de la dirección espacial. De otro lado, los otolitos están integrados a receptores de señales visuales y propioceptivas, y a los órganos que se encargan de la distribución regional de la sangre, los movimientos y tracción del abdomen, y los cambios en la presión intraocular e intracraneal.


Si bien, los detalles son fascinantes, como conclusión inmediata podemos decir que, de hecho, nos hemos logrado adaptar a experimentar ‘viscosamente’ el mundo, con pequeños rezagos de elasticidad temporal. Este estiramiento del tiempo nos ayuda a coordinarnos e integrarnos continuamente con la condición física de siempre estar cayendo.2 En el contact –y en cualquier tipo de entrenamiento corporal – aprendemos a devenir otolíticos, es decir, sensibles a la gravedad y a la aceleración a través del movimiento visceral con otros cuerpos; la fricción, la elasticidad y la espera se utilizan para convertir a la totalidad del cuerpo en un órgano de la escucha. En este caso, la extensión metafórica del escuchar el contacto con la piel es en realidad parte del reconocimiento amplio de la cualidad vibracional de todo el espectro de lo corporal, desde lo físico hasta lo auditivo.

Esto quiere decir que todo el sistema perceptual en sí mismo es flexible y se adapta a la vida de la persona en sus diferentes dimensiones. Desde hace más de cien años existe un profundo legado de estudios psicológicos, cuyos resultados muestran el efecto que tiene el manejo de la atención (formas de concentración y distracción) en los métodos de seguimiento ocular, y otras funciones vestibulares que parecen atormentar a la investigación biológica pero que de hecho son pertinentes para la neurología. Aquí nuevamente, la conciencia y la atención pueden desempeñar un papel activo en la formación del sensorium y la capacidad de respuesta del cuerpo-mente.

Actualmente, la biología del desarrollo parece asemejarse a la noción de responsividad de Bourdieu. En esta el habitus (el cuerpo-mente vivido) es “ un principio generativo incorporado de improvisaciones reguladas, [a la vez] negadas como tales”. El habitus es “historia convertida en naturaleza”, en lo sensible y en lo mental. (Bourdieu, 1977, 78–79). Esta noción de cuerpo-mente tiene un mejor rendimiento que las nociones normativas y genéticas de la biología; sin embargo, todavía esta articulada a partir de la división entre una fase de aprendizaje (desarrollo temprano) y una fase en la que se consolidan las estructuras objetivas inconscientes. Como tal, es útil para explicar el efecto de la conciencia sobre la organización biológica, o viceversa. Estos efectos aún se tratan como si fueran anomalías que esperan a ser corregidas y normalizadas.

El teórico del movimiento Feldenkrais nos presenta una concetualización ligeramente diferente: “El sistema nervioso está ahí para que olvidemos que tenemos uno”. (Feldenkrais, 1981, 254; Ginsburg, 2010.) En tanto trabajador corporal, él tomó esta noción de auto-olvido inmunológico, y la interpretó como un sistema receptivo viviente, el cual siempre se encuentra en estado embrionario y en permanente desarrollo. Así, podemos establecer un diálogo constante con este sistema, entrenándolo y, a la vez, olvidándolo. La duración histórica en curso es la clave: incluso la plasticidad cerebral es tratada, con demasiada frecuencia, como una cosa sustancial, más que como el resultado de un entrenamiento. Tenemos que hacer las cosas de manera atenta, una y otra y otra vez. Es necesario que ejerzamos la práctica-como-investigación con el propósito de desvelar el proceso de devenir – otolítico, esto es, devenir cuerpos-mentes llenos de viscosidad, elasticidad, anticipación y retraso, bien sea mientras uno se mueve, o mientras se está erguido o sentado. El límite de cada uno de estos sentidos del equilibrio sería entender cómo cada momento en el que usted se mantiende erguido modela y refuerza un futuro que tanto usted como su mundo habitan, imaginan, normativizan y encarnan fisiológicamente.


image


Versión en inglés


While you are reading, try and stay balanced.

You may sit up straight, or stand still.


As you are staying balanced, if you slump, or even lean against something, you can convince yourself you are stable. But even then, if you attend closely, slowly, softly, you’ll find movement happening, a little dance. If you reach out an arm slowly and softly, you will find all of your muscles dynamically anticipating your movement (starting with your opposite foot). You literally can’t stop this. Every gesture you make shifts your balancing requiring a response by your whole body, by your “one muscle”, or you would fall over. Though “response” makes it seem as if one gesture starts and then the others happen after. But the initial gesture is within, within your brain and your spine and your muscles and fascia – within your vestibulospinal balancing system – it is part of an anticipatory, open-ended, emergence of posture – from within the background small dance of muscles. Even the smallest gesture, like rolling your eyes, can be felt as a whole-body action – but that is for another lesson (but try it slowly).

You can lean in your chair and feel like you’re going to topple over. Or you can wiggle while feeling into your jelly-like nature, the spongy elastic body that you also are. You can even wiggle slower, so slow that you can feel each part stretching the ones next to them — fascia (Dumit and O’Connor, 2016). Here you really need to learn to move at the speed of your attention, your attention to your parts (Little, 2016). This is something you can easily get better at, if you take time, and you will differentiate more and more parts of balancing.


These small exercises are a form of practice as research, of practicing attention while doing, attention to how practice creates new forms of noticing, of adapting to what changes through the practice. I think we can generalize from this, that any practice is a specific type of attention (Little and Dumit, 2018). Practicing is not just doing something, all doings are also attendings, and as practicing changes us, each practice is a way of becoming, developing, and therefore each practicing is forming a life, displacing a previous form (a little). Each is its own way of worlding (Stewart, 2017).

But is balance good? Is there any way for it not to be good? Balance is often an affective baseline, a neutral-positive noun, an image of quantification. Two (or more) things are made equivalent along a dimension of measurement. Of course, it is not simple in practice, since like the balanced brain or diet it can only be retroactive. Figure out, or dictate, what “good” healthy people have or eat, and then declare those ratios to be balanced – balance transmits affects into objects. This concept or image of balance is also doubly reductive: reducing food or your brain to a set of generic categories, and reducing people to types — human, gendered, raced, classed, BMI’d (body mass indexed). This image of ideally reduced balance shapes how we think and imagine the world. Balance is part of a more general “genre of human” (in Sylvia Wynter’s terms) (Wynter, 2015), that biosocially shapes thought and practice and society in colonial, capitalist, racist, nutritional, medical, biological and entertaining ways. Tracing balance as concept then begins with following these processes of making people as they make balance: balance of trade, balance of power, balance life and work, balance as metaphor and practice. Balance as a form of obfuscation or ideology that is at the core of how we live our lives in society. One aided in no small part by how we understand ourselves as bodyminds who balance.

But opposing concept to practice misses the point: concepts are also practice as research, in both mundane and profound ways. Each use of a concept, each saying of a word, is an adapting, an improvising, it displaces itself (a little). Each concept is its own form of attention, its own way of attending, its own way of becoming. Each concept therefore helps form a life, and each concept worlds. Practice as research here involves moving with concepts, physicalizing them by putting them into practice, attending to how they are put into variation (see O’Connor this issue). And there is no practicing that does not involve concepts, they are the very distinctions that are discovered.

Why balancing? Wikipedia describes the sense of balance or equilibrioception as one of the physiological senses that helps prevent humans and animals from falling over when standing or moving. This description makes it seem as if falling is the problem and stability is the solution. Being balanced then becomes a state, something to achieve, an ideal and even personally a norm. In teaching a tight-wire walking class in 2016, many of our students lived with this norm:


“In my own perception of the word, balance is synonymous with control. When I claim that I’m feeling balanced, I’m really saying that I feel in control of my body, my movements, my thoughts, my focus. Balance is a state of mind that I feel like I’m constantly striving towards.”


Learning tight-wire walking revealed to all of us that balance was not a noun but a verb, balancing, a practice and a process. Even as students learned to walk the wire, they were never done balancing. I came to co-teach the class in part because I have spent the last six years getting pulled into the community of contact improvisation – a form of moving together with others with an emphasis on shared weight and improvisation as a form of experimenting with habits.3 I was and am fascinated with what contact improvisers call labs. In most classes and workshops I have taken, the teachers are actively sharing their current curiosities. Teaching consists not of passing on knowledge as expert to non-expert, but of taking everyone on a journey through the edge of what the teacher knows. The vitality of this approach is immediately felt and generates a community invested in seeing what can happen. The dance studio here becomes what Francisco Varela described as a portable laboratory — he was referring to meditation.

“The Stand” is a practice or score from the earliest days of contact improvisation, that co-founder Steve Paxton introduced around 1977. In it, you stand. Feet under shoulders, knees slightly bent, and usually you close your eyes. And as you do so, in time, you can become aware of these many little movements or gestures that your body makes, parts settling, others tensing, shifting, flowing. Try this for at least five minutes – you will most likely start by being bored, but boredom is the opportunity to find what interests you. “Boredom is integral to the process of taking one’s time.” (Phillips working with Winnicott) (Phillips, 1994).

Standing can come to be experienced as repeatedly slightly falling off-balance and catching yourself. This description converts the Wikipedia notion of balancing as preventing falling, into balancing as a continual series of falls and recoveries.

Given more time, and really this talk should be a two-hour workshop-lab, the stand as practice often morphs within awareness into an experience of what Paxton calls “The Small Dance”. Standing as continuously falling – falling upward as much as downward. Two things become reimagined and experienced here: balancing as falling; and falling as only bad if you don’t know what to do next, or can’t adjust, or don’t want to. Contact improvisation then becomes a training in learning to fall creatively.

While I’m an anthropologist, I’m also approaching these labs as scientific research. I consider myself part of an extended network of transdisciplinary practice as research involving movers, bodyworkers, and improvisers who conduct bodymind experiments, asking how the experiments change capacities and experiences (IMC, Labodance, Freiburg, ModLab). They are as interested in becoming better movers, bodyworkers and improvisers as they are about gaining some sort of disembodied knowledge. This a paradigm of research that includes first person perspectives within whatever we might want to call objectivity (Petitmengin, 2009).Standing, as a small dance, has been run as a lab continuously for 40 years. I’ve encountered it in at least a fifth of the approximately 200 labs and workshops I’ve attended over the past six years. A key reason is that it provides a relatively quiet site for noticing body and awareness, and how nuanced and inseparable they are. In asking people to do something attentively, they find themselves moved by the concepts or metaphors that inhabit them, and as they move differently, the metaphors can shift. Dancing with metaphors becomes a way of practice as research. Kevin O’Connor (2018) has also noticed how important it is to vary the people. People bring their lives to metaphors; no metaphor is ever dead when we realize this; all metaphors move us. The apparent stability of a metaphor is an effect of the bubble we live in. The apparent stability of a metaphor or concept or form of attention is an effect of a normalizing world. Dancing with concepts is a type of empirical philosophy, a phrase I learned from Annamarie Mol (Mol, 2003). Following a concept around and to different people, but also here putting a concept to the test of movement: I’m told to be still. I find that I can become more still, that, with time, with practice, there are yet other ways of being still. My notions of stillness, my imaginary of self being still, my forms of attention to stillness are put into variation. I can become still in more ways, and I find more in the concept, the metaphors of stillness multiply. Through this living vocabulary, I have become a thinker with my body (Bjerre, 2018). When someone else talks about an object at rest, I wonder which kind of stillness inhabits that rest?In my students’ popular understanding, balance is opposed to gravity. Medical dictionaries actually define a group of muscles as antigravity because of their role in “stabilizing joints by opposing the efforts of gravity” (Fritz, 2016). Researchers disagree on which muscles to count, but they can include those of the jaw which would otherwise hang open. The trap of this language and consequent body images is that it reinforces and trains us to perceive effort in going up and collapse in going down. Stabilization upward and destabilization downward. And like the notion of brain imbalance, it works; we can function this way. There is a whole field of ideokinesis that studies how our movement is shaped by our images of anatomy (Todd, 2017).Since my main movement for twenty academic years was sitting and walking, in the first three months of contact improvisation I experienced going down as falling, and falling as frightening — to the point where most falls were completely unconscious flashes. I just fell. Balance would be there, until it wasn’t, and I would start to fall, panic… and hit the floor with no awareness of how I got to the ground. Most of the time my eyes would close too. I knew what was going to happen after all; why did I need to see it? My system functioned just fine, with bruises. It was weird to realize how much I was doing while falling: in addition to closing my eyes, I was tensing many muscles, bracing, clenching teeth, not paying attention to what my partner was doing, making up a story about my trajectory, complaining myself that I’m too old and too clumsy and I’ll never figure it out, etc. Weirder still, to realize how little training I had ever had in how to fall. I had been helped to balance in standing, to walk and ride a bike, but not how to fall. I know these things are taught to dancers, athletes, martial artists, but in talking with them it is usually about falling in very specific contexts — how to fall on this type of surface from that type of throw. Learning standing as a small dance of falling, as a dance I was always already doing, was an attending to attending. Learning to ask: How am I standing, how is this falling, what is falling so that another part can rise? This dialogue with my bodymind was not quick. It was over three months before I could keep my eyes open while falling upside down. Yet years later, I experienced an entire set of choices and even a bit of joy inside a short fall: falling had become dancing. It always feels very vulnerable to fall this way. Contact improvisation is in many ways the opposite of martial arts. In those you often want to disguise your intent, keep your center away from your opponent, and move faster than their attention. In contact, you give your partner(s) your center, to play with. You give them as much information about your body as you possibly can, while listening to theirs and to what they need to know. It involves a lot of trust, but not complete. Ideally neither of you knows what’s going to happen next, so you are always ready to fall. Martin Keogh and Neige Christenson call this “the play of weight”.Tightwire walkers in our class had similar shifts in experience, with time. Courtney King wrote, “Like a bumbling clown, I challenged the wire to a duel instead of asking it to dance. Little did I know that it was never about an act of conquest. I simply needed to become familiar enough with the wire for it to feel comfortable telling me its secrets.” Another said “By the third week, I start developing a relationship with the rope.” So how do we sense ourselves balancing? Delving into the world of ear biology for answers, we enter the strange spacetime of vibrations and gelatins, of labyrinths of hairy viscosity, and time-lags. The same architecture that transduces air vibrations into sound, also adapts our bobbly heads propped on wiggly bodies into active engagement with an unstable world. Head orientation is sensed by means of viscus fluid movement called endolymph. “Endolymph follows the rotation of the canal, however, due to inertia lags behind initially, which bends and activates the cupula. After any extended rotation the endolymph catches up to the canal and the cupula returns to its upright position and resets.” (Bernard, 2006).

The inner ear structure uses a gel layer of stones, or otoliths, as “gravity, balance, movement, and directional indicators”, but they do not do so alone. These are integrated with visual and proprioceptive cues, regional blood distribution, movements and traction of the organs within your belly, and changes in intraocular and intracranial pressure.

The details are fascinating, but two quick takeaways are that we have adapted to experience the world viscously, with little lags of temporal elasticity — this stretching of time helps us coordinate and integrate ourselves continuously, to always be falling.4 In contact improvisation (and movement training in general) we learn to become otolithic – sensitive to gravity and acceleration through viscus movement with others – friction, elasticity and lagging are used to turn the entire body into a listening organ. Here the metaphoric extension of listening to skin contact is actually part of the extended detection of vibration across the spectrum of physical to auditory.

The whole system itself, in other words, is adaptable and adapting to the integral life of the person. There is a deep legacy of psychological studies going back over a hundred years showing the effect of forms of concentration and


distraction on eye tracking and other vestibular functions that seems to haunt the biology but envelop the neurology. Here again awareness and attention can play an active role in shaping the sensorium and responsivity of the bodymind.Today’s developmental biology seems mostly akin to a Bourdieuian genre of responsivity: where the habitus (the lived bodymind) is a “durably installed generative principle of regulated improvisations [and] denied as such.” Habitus is “History turned into nature,” into the sensible, into the reasonable. (Bourdieu, 1977, 78–9). This genre of bodymind is better than normative and genetic notions of biology as standardized, but it is still fixated on a division between a phase of learning (early development) and a phase of unconscious objective structures. As such, it does know how to account for the effect of awareness on biological organization or vice versa. These are still treated in a mode of anomalies waiting to be assimilated. Movement theorist Feldenkrais offered a slightly different genre: “The nervous system is there in order that we should not know that we have one.” (Feldenkrais, 1981, 254; Ginsburg, 2010.) As a bodyworker, he took this notion of forgetting as a living responsive system, always embryonic and developing, one that could still be reminded, trained, dialogued with. Duration, ongoing history, is the key: even brain plasticity is too often treated as a thing and not a training. We need to do things again, and again, attentively. We really do need practice as research to investigate becoming otolithic, full of viscosity, elasticity, anticipation and lag while moving, standing, and sitting. The limit of each of these balancings would be understanding how every moment you stand is shaping and reinforcing a future you and your world in habits, imaginings, norms, and biology.


Referencias

Baloh, R. and Honrubia, V. (2011). Clinical neurophysiology of the vestibular system. Oxford: Oxford Universiy Press.

Bernard, A. Steinmuller, W and Stricker, U. eds. (2006). Ideokinesis: A creative approach to human movement and body alignment. 1 edition. Berkeley, Calif: North Atlantic Books.

Bjerre Jensen, D. (2018). Relational Fields – Touch and Relation in the Frame of Process Philosophy and Contact Improvisation. Thesis. The Danish National School of Performing Arts.

Bourdieu, P. (1977). Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Despret, V. (2016). What would animals say if we asked the right questions? B. Buchanan trans. 1 edition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Dumit, J, and O’Connor, K. (2016). Sciences and senses of fascia: A practice as research investigation, in L. Hunter, E. Krimmer, and P. Licht- enfels, eds. Sentient performativities of embodiment: Thinking alongside the human. Lanham: Lexington Books, 35–54.

Feldenkrais, M. (1981). The illusive obvious. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications.

Fritz, S. (2016). Mosby’s fundamentals of therapeutic massag. –E-Book. Elsevier Health Sciences.Ginsburg, C. (2010). The intelligence of moving bodies: A somatic view of life and its consequences. AWAREing Press. Godard, H. (1994). Reading the Body in Dance. Rolf Lines 22(3), 36–41.

Goldman, D. (2010). I want to be ready: Improvised dance as a practice of freedom. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Gottschild, B. (2003). The black dancing body: A geography from coon to cool. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hennessey, J. (2016). Ambivalent Norms, Radical Potential: Contact Improvisation Re-Considered. Dissertation in Performance Studies, University of California Davis.

Little, N. and Dumit, J. (2018). Articulating presence: Attention is tactile, in Sarco-Thomas ed. Thinking touch, in partnering and contact improvisation, Malaika, Submitted.

Little, N. (2016). Enminded performance: Dancing with a horse, in L. Hunter, E. Krimmer, and P. Lichtenfels, eds. Sentient performativities of embodiment: Thinking alongside the human. Lanham: Lexington Books, 93–116.

Mol, A. (2003). The body multiple: Ontology in medical practice. Durham: Duke University Press.

O’Connor, K. (2018). Mechanical Models, Bio-Tensegrity Models and Displacement: How Models Matter. Displacements. April 19th. The 2018 Biennial meetin of the society of cultural anthopology. New York.

Petitmengin, C. (Ed.) (2009). Ten years of viewing from within: The legacy of Francisco Varela. Exeter: Imprint Academic.

Phillips, A. (1994). On kissing, tickling, and being bored: Psychoanalytic essays on the unexamined life. 1st edition. Cambridge (Mass.): Harvard University Press.

Schaffman, K. (2001). From the margins to the mainstream: Contact improvisation and the commodification of touch. PhD Thesis, Univer- sity of California, Riverside.

Stewart, K. (2017). Mattering compositions, in B. Gretchen and M. Peterson, eds. Between matter and method: Encounters In anthropolo- gy and art. M. Bloomsbury Academic, 45–67.

Sweigard, E. (2017). Human movement potential: Its ideokinetic facilitation. s. l.: Allegro Editions. Todd, M. (2013). The thinking body. Martino Fine Books.

Wynter, S. and McKittrick, K. (2015). Unparalleled catastrophe for our species? Or, to give humanness a different future: Conversations, in

K. McKittric, ed. Sylvia Wynter: On being human as praxis. Durham: Duke University Press, 34–53.