DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/2322939X.9726

Publicado:

2014-12-19

Número:

Vol. 11 Núm. 2 (2014)

Sección:

Entorno Social

Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte

Detection and identification of urban heat islands: an approach from the state of the art

Autores/as

  • John Petearson Anzola Anzola

Palabras clave:

Islas de calor urbano, redes de sensores, procesamiento digital de imagen, minería de datos, autómatas celulares, técnicas hibridas (es).

Palabras clave:

Urban heat islands, sensor networks, digital image processing, data mining, cellular automata, hybrid techniques (en).

Referencias

J. Fernández Córdoba and N. García Millán, “Caracterización de Islas Frescas Urbanas IFU en la ciudad de Santiago de Cali, Colombia,” Entorno Geogr., no. 9, 2014.

J. L. Santiago, E. S. Krayenhoff, and A. Martilli, “Flow simulations for simplified urban configurations with microscale distributions of surface thermal forcing,” Urban Clim., 2014.

L. Prashad, “Urban Heat Island,” Encycl. Remote Sens., pp. 878–881, 2014.

H.-Q. Kang, B. Zhu, T. Zhu, J.-L. Sun, and J.-J. Ou, “Impact of Megacity Shanghai on the Urban Heat Island Effects over the Downstream City Kunshan,” Boundary-Layer Meteorol., pp. 1–16, 2014.

N. L. Alchapar, E. N. Correa, and M. A. Cantón, “Classification of building materials used in the urban envelopes according to their capacity for mitigation of the urban heat island in semiarid zones,” Energy Build., vol. 69, pp. 22–32, 2014.

K. Menberg, P. Bayer, K. Zosseder, S. Rumohr, and P. Blum, “Subsurface urban heat islands in German cities,” Sci. Total Environ., vol. 442, pp. 123–133, 2013.

K. Zhu, P. Bayer, P. Grathwohl, and P. Blum, “Groundwater temperature evolution in the subsurface urban heat island of Cologne, Germany,” Hydrol. Process., 2014.

G. Sinnathamby, H. Gustavsson, L. Korkiala- Tanttu, and C. P. Cervera, “Numerical Analysis of Seasonal Heat Storage Systems of Alternative Geothermal Energy Pile Foundations,” J. Energy Eng., 2014.

K. J. Doick, A. Peace, and T. R. Hutchings, “The role of one large greenspace in mitigating London’s nocturnal urban heat island,” Sci. Total Environ., vol. 493, pp. 662–671, 2014.

A. Martilli, “Modelización de los efectos urbanos en modelos meteorológicos,” Tiempo y Clima, vol. 5, no. 13, 2014.

H. Zhang, Z. Qi, X. Ye, Y. Cai, W. Ma, and M. Chen, “Analysis of land use/land cover change, population shift, and their effects on spatiotemporal patterns of urban heat islands in metropolitan Shanghai, China,” Appl. Geogr., vol. 44, pp. 121–133, 2013.

L. Zhao, X. Lee, R. B. Smith, and K. Oleson, “Strong contributions of local background climate to urban heat islands,” Nature, vol. 511, no. 7508, pp. 216–219, 2014.

B. Song and K. Park, “Validation of ASTER Surface Temperature Data with In Situ Measurements to Evaluate Heat Islands in Complex Urban Areas,” Adv. Meteorol., vol. 2014, 2014.

M. S. Wong and J. E. Nichol, “Spatial variability of frontal area index and its relationship with urban heat island intensity,” Int. J.

Remote Sens., vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 885–896, 2013.

M. Lazzarini, P. R. Marpu, and H. Ghedira, “Temperature land cover interactions: The inversion of urban heat island phenomenon in desert city areas,” Remote Sens. Environ., vol.

, pp. 136–152, 2013.

E. Vardoulakis, D. Karamanis, A. Fotiadi, and G. Mihalakakou, “The urban heat island effect in a small Mediterranean city of high summer temperatures and cooling energy demands,” Sol. Energy, vol. 94, pp. 128–144, 2013.

M. Xiaoyang and X. Feng, “Study on reducing urban heat island effect about ‘White Roofs Plan,’” China Sci. Technol. Inf., vol. 8, p. 17, 2014.

P. J. C. Schrijvers, H. J. J. Jonker, S. Kenjereš, and S. R. de Roode, “Breakdown of the night time urban heat island energy budget,” Build. Environ., 2014.

V. Dorer, J. Allegrini, K. Orehounig, P. Moonen, G. Upadhyay, J. Kämpf, and J. Carmeliet, “Modelling the urban microclimate and its impact on the energy demand of buildings and building clusters,” in Proceedings of BS 2013, 2013, no. EPFL-CONF-195745, pp. 3483–3489.

Z.-H. Wang, E. Bou-Zeid, and J. A. Smith, “A coupled energy transport and hydrological model for urban canopies evaluated using a wireless sensor network,” Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., vol. 139, no. 675, pp. 1643–1657, 2013.

C.-D. Wu, S.-C. C. Lung, and J.-F. Jan, “Development of a 3-D urbanization index using digital terrain models for surface urban heat island effects,” ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens., vol. 81, pp. 1–11, 2013.

Q. Weng and P. Fu, “Modeling annual parameters of clear-sky land surface temperature variations and evaluating the impact of cloud cover using time series of Landsat TIR data,” Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 140, pp. 267–278, 2014.

L. Taheriazad, C. Portillo-Quintero, and A. Sanchez-Azofeifa, “Application of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) to Oil Sands Environmental Monitoring,” 2014.

C. L. Muller, L. Chapman, C. S. B. Grimmond, D. T. Young, and X. Cai, “Sensors and the city: a review of urban meteorological networks,” Int. J. Climatol., vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 1585–1600, 2013.

R. Nolz, G. Kammerer, and P. Cepuder, “Calibrating soil water potential sensors integrated into a wireless monitoring network,” Agric. Water Manag., vol. 116, pp. 12–20, 2013.

T.-Y. Pai, M.-B. Chang, and S.-W. Chen, “Application of Computational Intelligence on Analysis of Air Quality Monitoring Big Data,” in Information Granularity, Big Data, and Computational Intelligence, Springer, 2015, pp. 427–441.

X. Yu, P. Wu, W. Han, and Z. Zhang, “Overview of wireless underground sensor networks for agriculture,” African J. Biotechnol., vol. 11, no. 17, pp. 3942–3948, 2014.

X. Yu, P. Wu, W. Han, and Z. Zhang, “A survey on wireless sensor network infrastructure for agriculture,” Comput. Stand. Interfaces, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 59–64, 2013.

H. R. Bogena, M. Herbst, J. A. Huisman, U. Rosenbaum, A. Weuthen, and H. Vereecken, “Potential of wireless sensor networks for measuring soil water content variability,” UNKNOWN,

vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1002–1013, 2010.

L. Ruiz-Garcia, L. Lunadei, P. Barreiro, and I. Robla, “A review of wireless sensor technologies and applications in agriculture and food industry: state of the art and current trends,” Sensors, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 4728–4750, 2009.

P. M. McAllister and C. Y. Chiang, “A practical approach to evaluating natural attenuation of contaminants in ground water,” Groundw. Monit. Remediat., vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 161–173, 1994.

Y. Kilicaslan, G. Tuna, G. G. Gezer, K. Gulez, O. Arkoc, S. M. Potirakis, and Y. Kiliçaslan, “ANN Based Estimation of Groundwater Quality Using a Wireless Water Quality Network,”

Int. J. Distrib. Sens. Networks, vol. 2014, 2014.

J. A. Muñoz Arcentales and V. C. Calero Bravo, “Diseño e Implementación de un Sistema de Riego Inteligente basado en Sensores y Módulos de Radiofrecuencia para Transmisión y Sistema de Control y Módulos de Radiofrecuencia para Transmisión y Sistema de Control,” 2014.

S. Khriji, D. E. Houssaini, M. W. Jmal, C. Viehweger, M. Abid, and O. Kanoun, “Precision irrigation based on wireless sensor network,” Sci. Meas. Technol. IET, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 98–106, 2014.

C. J. Watras, M. Morrow, K. Morrison, S. Scannell, S. Yaziciaglu, J. S. Read, Y.-H. Hu, P. C. Hanson, and T. Kratz, “Evaluation of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for remote wetland monitoring: design and initial results,” Environ. Monit. Assess., vol. 186, no. 2, pp. 919–934, 2014.

A. M. Correia, “Use of satellite images landsat 5 tm in identification of islands of heat in the city of Recife-PE,” J. Hyperspectral Remote Sens., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 45–53, 2014.

P. Coseo and L. Larsen, “How factors of land use/land cover, building configuration, and adjacent heat sources and sinks explain Urban Heat Islands in Chicago,” Landsc. Urban Plan., vol. 125, pp. 117–129, 2014.

C. Chaiwatpongsakorn, M. Lu, T. C. Keener, and S.-J. Khang, “The Deployment of Carbon Monoxide Wireless Sensor Network (COWSN) for Ambient Air Monitoring,” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, vol. 11, no. 6, pp.6246–6264, 2014.

V. Karthikeyan, “Analysis of Water observation Organization Based on GSM and Wireless Sensor Technology.”

R. P. Barnwal, S. Bharti, S. Misra, and M. S. Obaidat, “UCGNet: wireless sensor network based active aquifer contamination monitoring and control system for underground coal

gasification,” Int. J. Commun. Syst., 2014.

W. Zhan, J. Zhou, W. Ju, M. Li, I. Sandholt, J. Voogt, and C. Yu, “Remotely sensed soil temperatures beneath snow-free skin-surface using thermal observations from tandem polar-orbiting satellites: An analytical three-time-scale model,” Remote Sens. Environ., vol.143, pp. 1–14, 2014.

A. Vanjare, S. N. Omkar, and J. Senthilnath, “Satellite Image Processing for Land Use and Land Cover Mapping,” Int. J. Image, Graph. Signal Process., vol. 6, no. 10, p. 18, 2014.

M. M. Rahman, G. J. Hay, I. Couloigner, and B. Hemachandran, “Transforming Image Objects into Multiscale Fields: A GEOBIA Approach to Mitigate Urban Microclimatic Variability within H-Res Thermal Infrared Airborne Flight-Lines,” Remote Sens., vol. 6, no. 10, pp.9435–9457, 2014.

A. A. Masoud, “Predicting salt abundance in slightly saline soils from Landsat ETM imagery using Spectral Mixture Analysis and soil spectrometry,” Geoderma, vol. 217, pp. 45–56, 2014.

J. Sun, “Exploring edge complexity in remote-sensing vegetation index imageries,” J. Land Use Sci., vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 165–177, 2014.

O. M. Ramos-González and others, “The green areas of San Juan, Puerto Rico,” Ecol. Soc., vol. 19, no. 3, p. 21, 2014.

D. Kolokotsa and K. Gobakis, “Spatial distribution of Urban Heat Island using Geographic Information System (GIS) in Greece,” Heat Islands, p. 56, 2014.

Y. Bai, I. Kaneko, H. Kobayashi, K. Kurihara, I. Takayabu, H. Sasaki, and A. Murata, “A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based approach to adaptation to regional climate change: a case study of Okutama-machi, Tokyo, Japan,” Mitig. Adapt. Strateg. lob. Chang.,vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 589–614, 2014.

A. Black and H. Stephen, “Relating temperature trends to the normalized difference vegetation index in Las Vegas,” GIScience Remote Sens., vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 468–482, 2014.

P. Sarricolea Espinoza and J. Martín-Vide, “El estudio de la Isla de Calor Urbana de Superficie del Área Metropolitana de Santiago de Chile con imágenes Terra-MODIS y Análisis de Componentes Principales,” Rev. Geogr. Norte Gd., no. 57, pp. 123–141, 2014.

J. Wickham, C. Homer, J. Vogelmann, A. Mc- Kerrow, R. Mueller, N. Herold, and J. Coulston, “The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium—20 Years of Development

and Integration of USA National Land Cover Data,” Remote Sens., vol. 6, no. 8, pp. 7424–7441, 2014.

B. Kupfer, N. S. Netanyahu, and I. Shimshoni, “An Efficient SIFT Based Mode-Seeking Algorithm for Sub-Pixel Registration of Remotely Sensed Images,” Geosci. Remote Sens. Lett. IEEE, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 379–383, 2015.

D. H. Levinson and C. J. Fettig, “Climate change: Overview of data sources, observed and predicted temperature changes, and impacts on public and environmental health,” in Global Climate Change and Public Health, Springer, 2014, pp. 31–49.

A. M. Dewan and R. J. Corner, “Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Urban Land Surface Temperature,” in Dhaka Megacity, Springer, 2014, pp. 219–238.

T. M. Giannaros, D. Melas, I. A. Daglis, and I. Keramitsoglou, “Development of an operational modeling system for urban heat islands: an application to Athens, Greece,” Nat. Hazards Earth

Syst. Sci., vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 347–358, 2014.

T. H. Woo, “Modified fuzzy algorithm based safety analysis of nuclear energy for sustainable hydrogen production in climate change prevention,” Int. J. Electr. Power Energy Syst., vol. 61, pp. 192–196, 2014.

J. Pleim, R. Gilliam, W. Appel, J. Godowitch, D. Wong, G. Pouliot, and L. Ran, “Application and Evaluation of High Resolution WRF CMAQ with Simple Urban Parameterization,” in Air Pollution Modeling and its Application XXIII, Springer, 2014, pp. 489–493.

N. Picone and A. M. Campo, “Comparación urbano rural de parámetros meteorológicos en la ciudad de Tandil, Argentina,” Rev. Climatol., vol. 14, 2014.

F. I. Paiva and M. E. Zanella, “Microclimas urbanos na área central do bairro da Messejana, Fortaleza/CE.,” Rev. EQUADOR, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 153–172, 2014.

G. L. Feyisa, K. Dons, and H. Meilby, “Efficiency of parks in mitigating urban heat island effect: An example from Addis Ababa,” Landsc. Urban Plan., vol. 123, pp. 87–95, 2014.

A. M. Bodzin, D. Anastasio, and V. Kulo, “Designing Google Earth activities for learning Earth and environmental science,” in Teaching Science and Investigating Environmental Issues with Geospatial Technology, Springer, 2014, pp. 213–232.

K. Krellenberg, R. Jordán, J. Rehner, A. Schwarz, B. Infante, K. Barth, A. Pérez, and others, “Adaptation to climate change in megacities of Latin America: Regional Learning Network of the research project ClimateAdaptationSantiago (CAS),” 2014.

T. Arola and K. Korkka-Niemi, “The effect of urban heat islands on geothermal potential: examples from Quaternary aquifers in Finland,” Hydrogeol. J., pp. 1–15, 2014.

M. Maimaitiyiming, A. Ghulam, T. Tiyip, F. Pla, P. Latorre-Carmona, Ü. Halik, M. Sawut, and M. Caetano, “Effects of green space spatial pattern on land surface temperature: Implications

for sustainable urban planning and climate change adaptation,” ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens., vol. 89, pp. 59–66, 2014.

M. Santamouris, C. Cartalis, A. Synnefa, and D. Kolokotsa, “On The Impact of Urban Heat Island and Global Warming on the Power Demand and Electricity Consumption of Buildings- A Review,” Energy Build., 2014.

S. Ahmed and M. F. Kaiser, “Geo-Environmental Assessment of the Suez Canal Area, using Remote sensing and GIS Techniques,” J. Earth Sci. Geotech. Eng., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 69–78,

H. Wu, L.-P. Ye, W.-Z. Shi, and K. C. Clarke, “Assessing the effects of land use spatial structure on urban heat islands using HJ-1B remote sensing imagery in Wuhan, China,” Int. J. Appl. Earth Obs. Geoinf., vol. 32, pp. 67–78, 2014.

A. Michopoulos, V. Skoulou, V. Voulgari, A. Tsikaloudaki, and N. A. Kyriakis, “The exploitation of biomass for building space heating in Greece: Energy, environmental and economic

considerations,” Energy Convers. Manag., vol. 78, pp. 276–285, 2014

Cómo citar

IEEE

[1]
J. P. Anzola Anzola, «Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte», Rev. Vínculos, vol. 11, n.º 2, pp. 127–139, dic. 2014.

ACM

[1]
Anzola Anzola, J.P. 2014. Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte. Revista Vínculos. 11, 2 (dic. 2014), 127–139. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/2322939X.9726.

ACS

(1)
Anzola Anzola, J. P. Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte. Rev. Vínculos 2014, 11, 127-139.

APA

Anzola Anzola, J. P. (2014). Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte. Revista Vínculos, 11(2), 127–139. https://doi.org/10.14483/2322939X.9726

ABNT

ANZOLA ANZOLA, John Petearson. Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte. Revista Vínculos, [S. l.], v. 11, n. 2, p. 127–139, 2014. DOI: 10.14483/2322939X.9726. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/vinculos/article/view/9726. Acesso em: 15 abr. 2024.

Chicago

Anzola Anzola, John Petearson. 2014. «Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte». Revista Vínculos 11 (2):127-39. https://doi.org/10.14483/2322939X.9726.

Harvard

Anzola Anzola, J. P. (2014) «Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte», Revista Vínculos, 11(2), pp. 127–139. doi: 10.14483/2322939X.9726.

MLA

Anzola Anzola, John Petearson. «Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte». Revista Vínculos, vol. 11, n.º 2, diciembre de 2014, pp. 127-39, doi:10.14483/2322939X.9726.

Turabian

Anzola Anzola, John Petearson. «Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte». Revista Vínculos 11, no. 2 (diciembre 19, 2014): 127–139. Accedido abril 15, 2024. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/vinculos/article/view/9726.

Vancouver

1.
Anzola Anzola JP. Detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano: un acercamiento desde el estado del arte. Rev. Vínculos [Internet]. 19 de diciembre de 2014 [citado 15 de abril de 2024];11(2):127-39. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/vinculos/article/view/9726

Descargar cita

Visitas

1109

Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.
DETECCIÓN E IDENTIFICACIÓN DE ISLAS DE CALOR URBANO: UN ACERCAMIENTO DESDE EL ESTADO DEL ARTE

DETECCIÓN E IDENTIFICACIÓN DE ISLAS DE CALOR URBANO: UN ACERCAMIENTO DESDE EL ESTADO DEL ARTE

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A UNIT IN FACEBOOK

Recibido: Noviembre-2014
Aprobado: Noviembre-2014

John Petearson Anzola Anzola

Ingeniero Electrónico, Universidad Manuela Beltrán, Bogotá D.C., Colombia. Magister en Ciencias de la Información y las Comunicaciones, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Bogotá D.C., Colombia. Docente: Fundación Universitaria Los Libertadores, Grupo de Investigación en Señales y Sistemas (GUIAS), Bogotá D.C., Colombia. john.anzola@gmail.com, jpanzolaa@libertadores.edu.co

Resumen

Este artículo aborda una descripción de los factores condicionantes encontrados en el estudio de detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano, resaltando el gradiente adiabático que relaciona temperaturas superficiales con alturas o profundidades y la influencia que tiene con el transporte de aire convectivo vertical y horizontal para la formación de islas de calor. Posteriormente la revisión bibliográfica del estado del arte rescata las técnicas y tecnologías más utilizadas, tales como: redes de sensores para el análisis de contaminación y teledetección, procesamiento digital de imagen aplicada a imágenes satelitales para extraer información mediante filtros de suavizamiento, eliminación de ruido y segmentación. Por último se destaca, la utilización de minería de datos con algoritmos de clustering, predicción y técnicas de implementación hibrida en autómatas celulares, ya que integran técnicas evolutivas y adaptativas dentro de un dominio espacial y temporal, resaltando su uso en la detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano

Palabras clave

Islas de calor urbano, redes de sensores, procesamiento digital de imagen, minería de datos, autómatas celulares, técnicas hibridas

Abstract

This article deals with a description of the environmental factors found in the study of detection and identification of urban heat islands, highlighting the adiabatic temperature gradient associated with surface heights or depths and the influence of the vertical and horizontal transport of convective air the formation of heat islands. Subsequently the literature review of the state of the art rescue techniques and technologies most commonly used, such as sensor networks for contamination analysis and remote sensing, digital image processing applied to satellite imagery to extract information using filters smoothing, noise removal and segmentation. Finally it emphasizes the use of data mining clustering algorithms, prediction techniques and hybrid deployment on cellular automata, as they integrate evolutionary and adaptive techniques within a spatial and temporal domain, highlighting its use in the detection and identification of urban heat islands.

Keywords

Urban heat islands, sensor networks, digital image processing, data mining, cellular automata, hybrid techniques

1. INTRODUCCIÓN

A nivel mundial, en el último siglo se incrementó la quema de carbón, aceite, petróleo y sus derivados, elevando los índices de dióxido de carbono y otros gases causantes del efecto invernadero. Como consecuencia se acrecentó la temperatura en la tierra en 1.5oF [1]. Esta alteración se debe a causas naturales y antropogénicas [2] que relacionan el clima, microclima y la temperatura en función del tipo de superficies donde los rayos del sol inciden directamente. Como ejemplo, las grandes edificaciones impiden el flujo de corrientes de aire de refrigeración a los puntos más cercanos a la superficie, causando que el transporte de aire convectivo vertical u horizontal disminuya y se produzca incrementos en la temperatura, debido a las masas de aire que quedan atrapadas. La sumatoria de estos efectos en zonas urbanas forma isla de calor urbano [3].

El transporte convectivo horizontal involucra las corrientes de viento que se convierten en portadoras de contaminantes dispersas horizontalmente. Estas corrientes de viento son cerradas y van acumulando contaminantes de forma progresiva, aumentando su concentración en zonas barridas por este tipo de vientos. Este tipo de efectos, se llevan a cabo en zonas y edificaciones de gran altura, donde los efectos aerodinámicos de estos obstáculos mitigan negativamente la dispersión de contaminantes y su acumulación en determinadas zonas [4].

No obstante, el transporte convectivo vertical es uno de los factores principales que determinan el grado de difusión vertical de contaminantes y el aumento de la temperatura en la atmósfera. Este efecto hace que la radiación solar sea absorbida por el asfalto y por superficies de concreto que se calientan por contacto directo, afectando lo que se encuentre a su alrededor. Las temperaturas transportadas por corrientes de aire que transmiten su calor en función de la altura, producen un cambio de estado térmico que se manifiesta en un estado de enfrentamiento, generando un gradiente de temperatura que en determinadas condiciones presenta una disminución de 1ºC por cada 100 metros de altura, a este fenómeno se denomina gradiente adiabático [5].

Una variación del gradiente adiabático se obtiene con la interpolación de temperaturas superficiales (T) en función de la profundidad (z) para regiones de corteza continental que es utilizado para obtener el gradiente geotérmico en zonas urbanas [6]. Las variaciones de temperatura en estados transientes tienden a ser estables la mayor parte del tiempo y se conoce como steady-state geotherm [7]. La expresión numérica de un geoterma en estado estable es igual a:

Donde Tz(0) corresponde a la temperatura superficial expresada en ºK y el gradiente geotérmico superficial es dT/dZ el cual se puede expresar en función del flujo térmico J donde dT/dZ = J/K obteniendo la segunda derivada del gradiente geotérmico:

Asumiendo que la concentración de estos elementos en la corteza es constante, la temperatura a cualquier profundidad es:

siendo J0 el flujo geotérmico medido en la superficie y A0 la producción radiogénica de calor en la superficie terrestre y z la profundidad o altura considerada según el punto de vista del observador. Si, la temperatura geotérmica del aire incrementa con la altura, se produce el fenómeno de inversión térmica, el cual produce una coacción en la dispersión de contaminantes produciendo el enfriamiento de superficies como el asfalto, concreto y zonas verdes por la irradiación nocturna del calor.

La inversión térmica se produce por el enfriamiento progresivo desde una superficie hacia arriba, y durante la noche tiende a disminuir progresivamente hasta la mañana, momento en el cual, la radiación solar incrementa la temperatura de la superficie nuevamente.

Existen otros factores condicionantes como: altura, elevación, densidad urbana, índice de vegetación, reflectividad, humedad, precipitación, distancia a ríos, trafico, inversiones térmicas y otras en menor grado, que generalmente influyen en la dispersión de contaminantes y en la concentración de estratos en el aire que originan masas que quedan atrapadas en zonas con ciertas condiciones [8].

La contaminación atmosférica y los factores que la condicionan son analizados por la micrometeorología, que estudia el comportamiento y los procesos meteorológicos en la tropósfera con distancias entre la superficie terrestre hasta aproximadamente 2000 metros. Los análisis térmicos en estas condiciones son espaciales y temporales, destacando la creación de microclimas en zonas urbanas que pueden convertirse en islas de calor urbano. La circulación de vientos locales eleva el aire caliente en el centro de las zonas urbanas originando corrientes de aire frio que son compensadas por las zonas verdes y rurales circundantes cuyo nivel de penetración en zonas urbanas es bajo [9].

El estudio de fenómenos térmicos en zonas urbanas y la formación de algunos casos espontáneos de islas de calor, van desde la formación y degradación de masas de aire, que para su estudio se han usado técnicas de simulación de modelos de formación de nubes y remolinos [10]. Otros trabajos de investigación para la toma de datos in situ, fueron datos tomados de estaciones meteorológicas en las que se obtuvieron medidas de temperatura, humedad y corrientes de viento [11]–[15].

En recientes artículos se destaca la disparidad de microclimas urbanos según las características propias de las ciudades, la posición geográfica, el índice de radiación solar que incide en las edificaciones y el tipo de materiales utilizados en las construcciones [5], la formación de Islas de Calor Urbano y su efecto de refrigeración y calefacción en las zonas urbanas y suburbanas [16], el análisis del efecto de las islas de calor urbano con acceso a mejores CTTC (Cluster Thermal Time Constant) y modelo STTC (Surface Thermal Time Constant), han permitido el análisis de efectos de formación en islas de calor mediante la utilización de algoritmos de agrupamiento o Clustering [17]–[19].

Con base en la revisión bibliográfica y el estado del arte se destacan los siguientes trabajos empleados en el análisis de formación de islas de calor urbano, encontrando que su mayor estudio ha sido realizado con:

  • Redes de Sensores [20]
  • Procesamiento digital de Imagen [21]
  • Minería de Datos [22]
  • 2. REDES DE SENSORES APLICADA EN MICROMETEOROLOGÍA

    Los sistemas inalámbricos de detección, medida y monitoreo son cada vez más utilizados, tanto en aplicaciones convencionales como en micrometeorología, captando comúnmente variables de precipitación, temperatura, humedad, dirección del viento, radiación, entre otras. La mayoría de los sistemas de medición en micrometeorología requieren un gran número de sensores y nodos detectores que cubran un área en particular y los datos pueden darse en tiempo real mediante la consulta del estado de algún sensor en particular.

    Cada nodo sensor dispone de capacidades de procesamiento en hardware y software que le permiten realizar tareas de adquisición, procesamiento y transmisión de datos a una unidad central. Este tipo de redes de sensores son parte de las redes autoconfigurables o espontaneas, las cuales no requieren de ningún tipo de red externa y la única condición es que la distancia de los nodos sensores estén en el rango de cobertura inalámbrica [23]

    Entre las aplicaciones más relevantes se encuentran

    • Redes de vigilancia climática y meteorológica [24]
    • Redes de monitoreo de aire, agua y suelos [25]
    • Redes de monitoreo del hábitat [26]

    2.1. Aplicaciones de redes de sensores en la agricultura

    Las redes de sensores inalámbricas se han implementado con gran auge en la agricultura siendo una de las áreas de mayor crecimiento en redes de sensores que favorecen la reducción en el consumo de agua y pesticidas para el mejoramiento de las condiciones del cultivo. La información que se extrae de las redes de sensores puede generar alertas del inicio de heladas en bajas y altas temperaturas de un cultivo y mediante sistemas de captura de datos llevar el análisis y estudio de microclimas en cultivos con opción de controlarlos [27].

    Las redes de sensores abarcan múltiples prácticas referentes a la gestión de cultivos y cosechas, árboles frutales, flores, plantas, ganado, entre otras. Las técnicas de detección de islas de calor aplicadas a microclimas en cultivos controlados han permitido la identificación de microorganismos en medio de cultivos, debido a que estos microorganismos comienzan a dividirse activamente liberando energía en forma de calor, los datos de la concentración, la densidad y la composición del medio del cultivo son capturados por los nodos sensores para obtener modelos cinéticos y dinámicos del crecimiento de microorganismos, estimando el tiempo y velocidad de propagación de estos [28].

    Entre las aplicaciones más relevantes se encuentran: Aplicación de redes inalámbricas de sensores para el monitoreo y control fluido y calidad del agua en diferentes cultivos [29]

    • Monitoreo del agua subterránea [30]
    • Monitoreo de Agua superficial [31], [32]
    • Sistemas de riego de precisión [33], [34]

    2.2. Redes de sensores en teledetección

    Las islas de calor urbano son consideradas como un fenómeno anómalo en la meteorología realizada sobre zonas urbanas, debido a la acumulación de calor como factor principal de este fenómeno. En los procesos de construcción de urbanizaciones, edificios y otras construcciones de gran tamaño, la expansión de las zonas urbanas y el aumento de la contaminación, han provocado que varias estaciones meteorológicas hayan quedado en zonas de formación de islas de calor, donde las medidas y datos derivados son erróneos, ya que no registran la climatología regional sino la forzada por el régimen de la isla de calor. Las redes de sensores como aplicación de teledetección permiten analizar esta problemática, aplicando una clasificación zonal supervisada de componentes urbanos para determinar los posibles factores que puedan influenciar sobre este fenómeno, se capta la medida de la radiación solar a partir del brillo de la temperatura en grados Kelvin y se transforma a grados centígrados con el objetivo de correlacionar las Islas de Calor con las diferentes variables que rodean el entorno urbano [35]–[37].

    2.3. Análisis de contaminación mediante redes sensoriales

    Las redes de sensores aplicadas al análisis de contaminación perciben las relaciones existentes entre las temperaturas máximas y mínimas en zonas urbanas, representando la totalidad de un conjunto de zonas por medio de la concentración de material contamínate en partes por millón (ppm). La división y delimitación de estas zonas urbanas por sensores analizan las peores condiciones durante el trascurso del día, capturando un histórico de condiciones de contaminación atmosférica, por horas, días, semanas, meses y años [38], [39].

    La información capturada permite construir una escala detallada que representa varios tipos característicos de morfología urbana, que se correlaciona con la actividad meteorológica de la zona, la cobertura de suelos, los tipos de superficies, los niveles de vegetación y la temperatura de las microrregiones que representan diversas localizaciones espaciales y temporales que permiten identificar y detectar la formación de islas de calor [40].

    3. IMÁGENES SATELITALES

    El procesamiento digital de imagen busca analizar, desarrollar y aplicar un conjunto de técnicas de preprocesamiento y procesamiento, cuyo objetivo fundamental es extraer información a partir de características de segmentación y morfología para su interpretación o aplicación específica, resaltando ciertas características de la misma.

    Los estudios realizados en la detección de Islas de Calor, han utilizado imágenes infrarrojas, térmicas, topográficas, para resaltar temperaturas anómalas, corrientes de aire, focos de contaminación, entre otros. Para la extracción de ciertos patrones que identifican un fenómeno particular se resaltan las siguientes tareas o técnicas:

    • Suavizamiento de imágenes [41], [42]
    • Eliminación del ruido [43], [44]
    • Realzar bordes [45]
    • Detectar bordes [46]

    3.1. Imágenes Satélites

    La información analizada a partir de imágenes de satélites compara la formación de islas térmicas urbanas con características físicas diferentes en las zonas rurales, encontrando un contraste térmico entre la relación campo/ciudad mediante la información aportada por los satélites NOAA y Landsat, comparada con los datos registrados por las estaciones meteorológicas locales se ha encontrado que las temperaturas en el día resultan con frecuencia más bajas en el interior de las ciudades, que en las áreas no urbanizadas. Las anomalías térmicas urbanas parecen responder a distintos ritmos de calentamiento/enfriamiento de las diferentes superficies, ya sea asfalto o superficies vegetales, de modo que la isla de calor urbana, sólo se manifiesta en horas nocturnas, caracterizando que durante el día algunas zonas muestran la formación de islas de frío, respecto a su entorno. De esta forma, las zonas rurales estarían acumulando temperatura durante el día, propagando su energía almacenada hacia las zonas urbanas durante la noche. Cabe destacar que este comportamiento caracterizó ciudades peninsulares que se encuentran en una zona templada que no tienen características climáticas homogéneas, al encontrar mezclas entre zonas de aire cálido y zonas de aire frío subtropicales y polares [7].

    3.2. Sistemas de Información Geográfica

    Las zonas intermedias entre ciudades presentan problemas ambientales que proporcionalmente a su tamaño y topología se consideran ciudades dentro de una metrópoli, comprometiendo su sistema natural envuelto en una isla expansiva de calor, humedad y masas de aire, afectando gravemente los suelos, zonas vegetales y temperaturas superficiales. Estos análisis se han obtenido mediante imágenes satelitales, secuencias temporales de fotos aéreas e información de actividades socio/económicas de la zona, analizando mediante la aplicación de sistemas de información geográfica su estructura, la caracterización del clima, cultivos, crecimiento urbano y otros procesos espaciales [8].

    Las técnicas empleadas para analizar la identificación, formación y propagación de islas de calor fueron soportadas en el análisis de los datos encontrados en un sistema de información geográfica, que contienen datos como el tamaño, perímetro y la intensidad del uso de los suelos, actividades económicas de las personas de la zona, con el fin de asegurar la sustentabilidad ambiental de las ciudades intermedias. Mediante las fotografías aéreas y satelitales se cotejaron las variaciones en construcciones y la evaluación ecológica de paisajes, particularmente los terrenos de expansión urbana y la densidad residencial, encontrando incrementos de temperatura en criaderos de peces, cerdos y aves, que se encuentran en los cordones de la zona urbana. Cabe destacar que las características de estas ciudades, en cuanto a sus edificaciones, no se encontraron edificios que superan los 20 metros de altura [48].

    3.3. Relación espacial y estadística entre las islas de calor de superficie

    El análisis de identificación de islas de calor se realizó mediante parámetros de temperatura, donde la tarea primordial consistía en obtener la temperatura superficial obtenida a partir del cálculo de la temperatura de cuerpos negros utilizado por la NASA para estimar la temperatura real [49]. En estos parámetros se requirió la asignación de coeficientes de emisividad en los diversos tipos de coberturas del suelo mediante la clasificación no supervisada de imágenes patrón, de esta forma se puede obtener los principales tipos de superficie [50].

    La reflectividad y contenido de humedad del suelo se obtuvo a partir de la transformación de imágenes, mediante los coeficientes hallados por Huang, donde se obtuvo dos nuevas imágenes, una que se segmenta la información de energía reflejada por la superficie y la otra segmenta el contenido de humedad del suelo [51].

    La obtención de la imagen de cobertura de vegetación se realizó mediante algoritmos clasificación de vecindad, con base en una imagen patrón de índice vegetal que permitió seleccionar sitios de entrenamiento sobre áreas altamente vegetadas, para posteriormente obtener diferencias espectrales o coeficientes de correlación sectorial que permiten determinar las zonas de vegetación. Mediante el algoritmo de Búsqueda Exhaustiva de Desagregación de Píxel [52], se obtuvo el porcentaje de vegetación contenido en cada píxel de la imagen.

    Con cada una de las anteriores técnicas empleadas se obtuvo criterios de discriminación como textura, forma, patrón, tonalidad, entre otros, que permitieron identificar islas de calor y su relación con zonas verdes a lo largo de imágenes donde hay incrementos de temperatura constante en el transcurso del día [53].

    4. ANÁLISIS MEDIANTE MINERÍA DE DATOS

    La minería de datos es el conjunto de técnicas y tecnologías que permiten analizar y explorar grandes volúmenes de información de manera automática, semiautomática o guiada mediante el conocimiento de un experto, con el objetivo de encontrar patrones repetitivos, tendencias, reglas de asociación, clasificación y predicción, de tal forma, que se pueda extraer conocimiento que con la estadística no es posible inferir su comportamiento en determinado contexto.

    Parte fundamental de la Minería de Datos se realiza con la comprensión del contenido de un banco de datos, con el fin de obtener información que a simple vista o inspección no es relevante. Esta tarea es soportada por algoritmos, técnicas de inteligencia artificial, sistemas adaptativos y evolutivos. Entre los trabajos más relevantes se encuentran:

    • Análisis de datos satelitales [54]
    • Modelamiento de Islas de calor mediante ANN [55]
    • Modelos de prevención de cambio climático [56]
    • Sistemas de predicción [57]

    4.1. Metodologías aplicadas

    Las principales técnicas que se han trabajado en el proceso general de clasificación de imágenes para detección de islas de calor, análisis de microclimas y caracterización de imágenes [58]–[60], en general abarcan la selección de las muestras de aprendizaje y la inserción de descriptores de textura en vectores de rasgos para cada patrón de interés particular [61], [62], que han trabajado en el desarrollo de métodos de clasificación espectral y espacial basadas en subpixel utilizando enfoques probabilísticos, basados en el aprendizaje y clasificación mediante redes neuronales. Las áreas de aplicación donde se han utilizado estas técnicas para reconocimiento de patrones en teledetección, micrometeorología y análisis de contaminación ambiental, se han empleado las siguientes tareas:

    • Detección de islas de calor [63].
    • Características de uso del suelo y la superficie espacial en la isla de calor urbano [64].
    • Ambientes Urbanos [65].
    • Detección de contaminantes en fuentes de agua [66].
    • Transeptos móviles y las técnicas de teledetección en islas de calor [67].
    • Estudio de la biomasa [68]
    • Análisis de Turbulencia [69].
    • Clasificación de cultivos agrícolas [70].
    • Simulación de sistemas urbanos complejos, mediante autómatas celulares y redes neuronales [71].
    • Estrategias de modelado para la mitigación del efecto islas de calor urbano [72].
    • Cartografía satelital [73].
    • Investigaciones oceanográficas y marinas [74].
    • Modelos estocásticos con autómatas celulares para análisis de la dinámica del uso del suelo urbano [75].

    Para el análisis de imágenes multiespectrales, se han utilizado técnicas de reconocimiento de patrones, con el fin de realizar una superposición espacial de los canales espectrales digitalizados, utilizando puntos de apoyo en las imágenes de referencia y métodos matemáticos de ajuste. Con respecto a las imágenes espaciales obtenidas por los satélites SPOT, LANDSAT y NOAA, se utilizaron con el fin de medir densidades de espacio superficial [76].

    5. TRABAJOS FUTUROS

    Los Autómatas Celulares basados en modelos matemáticos y con pocas reglas, pueden simular la complejidad de cualquier sistema por complejo que sea, aunque no en su totalidad, los cuales pueden presentar y describir una forma básica de su comportamiento complejo.

    Los diversos desarrollos teóricos realizados en la inteligencia artificial, perfilan un futuro en el cual, las tendencias que se observan, apuntan al estudio de modelos híbridos, cuyo objeto busca resaltar las potencialidades de diferentes metodologías y técnicas. Por ejemplo, las redes neurales y la computación evolutiva, las cuales fueron incluidas en simulaciones realizadas en autómatas celulares [77]. La fusión de técnicas, ya sean de minería de datos, procesamiento de imágenes, inteligencia artificial, computación evolutiva, entre otras, con autómatas celulares, pueden ser utilizados como herramientas de ajuste de patrones que mejoren el rendimiento y la efectividad de una tarea, por lo tanto, estos modelos híbridos y su desarrollo se han visionado un campo prometedor en el perfeccionamiento de modelos urbanos para la detección de islas de calor mediante autómatas celulares.

    6. CONCLUSIONES

    Las técnicas aplicadas en diferentes partes del mundo han arrojado resultados que van de acuerdo al contexto geográfico y socio/económico, encontrando que el aumento de islas de calor, es más pronunciado en países desarrollados, y han generado políticas que han regularizado la construcción dentro de las ciudades, teniendo en cuenta los siguientes aspectos:

    • Reducción de parqueaderos de una sola planta descubiertosz
    • La utilización de pavimento de materiales porosos
    • Ampliación de zonas verdes
    • Alternativas de Transporte
    • Bioenergía

    Lo anterior, describe medidas tomadas por Agencia de Protección al Medio Ambiente de los Estados Unidos, dentro de su programa desarrollo inteligente e islas urbanas de calor [78], [79].

    Actualmente, las redes de sensores inalámbricos han penetrado al interior de las ciudades en aplicaciones de telemetría, es por ello que se espera que en los próximos años evolucione de forma significativa con la inmersión de dispositivos electrónicos de mayor cobertura, alternativas energéticas y la expansión de redes sensoriales en automóviles, hogares, centros comerciales, entre otros. Las investigaciones realizadas en micrometeorología apuntan en directrices donde resulta fundamental disponer de sensores de tamaño pequeño y gran autonomía, por lo que se investiga tanto en técnicas de miniaturización como de bajo consumo de potencia, adicionalmente, su interconexión al medio lo realiza con los protocolos de comunicación estándar (Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, WiMAX, FHSS, Zigbee, entre otros).

    Bajo esta apropiación de tecnología las redes de sensores han desarrollado paralelamente su estudio en aplicaciones, bajo estos dispositivos o análisis de los datos capturados y almacenados, con técnicas de inteligencia artificial o minería de datos, en el cual, su procesamiento arroja información de tendencias climáticas y en determinados casos, de predicción, aplicándose ya con éxito en algunas experiencias agrícolas, lo que sin lugar a dudas augura un futuro más que prometedor para esta tecnología en cuanto a medición, modelamiento y predicción de variables climáticas.

    Otra opción de análisis para detección y modelamiento de islas de calor, está en el procesamiento de imágenes, en particular las imágenes satelitales, en las cuales se resalta la extracción de información como densidad urbana, índice de vegetación, reflectividad, humedad, precipitación, nubosidad, velocidad de las corrientes de viento, fuentes hidrográficas, tráfico vehicular, inversiones térmicas, entre otras. Estas variables se han estudiado, en su asimilación, desarrollo teórico de técnicas de reconocimiento de patrones de imágenes utilizadas en teledetección, dejando un abanico de posibilidades para implementar nuevos algoritmos, en especial con técnicas adaptivas y evolutivas como las redes neuronales y los algoritmos genéticos, la mayoría de estos, fundamentados en la estadística multivariada y otros pertenecientes al campo de estados numéricos finitos. En el campo de la minería de datos, los clasificadores estadísticos implementados en la mayor parte de estudios realizados a nivel mundial, arroja resultados acertados en la detección de islas de calor y variables micrometeorológicas, en el cual, los algoritmos más implementados son: métodos de McQueen [80], ISODATA (Iterative Self-Organizing Data Analysis Techniques), K–Medias, Máxima Verosimilitud, clasificador neuronal Paralelepípedo, el cual utiliza capas en tres dimensiones, regla Min- Max utilizada en el análisis de datos, clasificador basado en algoritmos de la mínima distancia a la media y su variante conocida como reglas del vecino más cercano, tanto para datos supervisados y no supervisados [81].

    Los clasificadores basados en redes neuronales de mayor implementación y sus variantes, se encuentran los modelos ART2, mapas auto-organizativos (SOM Self-Organizing Map) o redes de kohonen, red de retropropagación y el modelo vectores de aprendizaje (LVQ Learning Vector Quantization), tanto para clasificación de datos supervisados y no supervisados.

    La implementación de técnicas hibridas, se han convertido en la alternativa de optimización dentro de los estudios futuros de detección e identificación de islas de calor urbano, donde los autómatas celulares permiten vincular técnicas evolutivas, como los algoritmos genéticos y adaptativos mediante redes neuronales y lógica difusa. Estos resultados obtenidos mediante este artículo de difusión, permitieron al grupo de investigación en señales y sistemas, abordar el análisis de islas de calor mediante la implementación de autómatas celulares fijos y dinámicos en dos dimensiones, brindando la posibilidad de analizar cualquier imagen, en el dominio espacial y poder analizar los datos entregados por estaciones meteorológicas con técnicas de minería de datos, promoviendo el estudio dentro de los semilleros de investigación al análisis de técnicas hibridas en el procesamiento de datos.

    7. REFERENCIAS

    [1] J. Fernández Córdoba and N. García Millán, “Caracterización de Islas Frescas Urbanas IFU en la ciudad de Santiago de Cali, Colombia,” Entorno Geogr., no. 9, 2014.

    [2] J. L. Santiago, E. S. Krayenhoff, and A. Martilli, “Flow simulations for simplified urban configurations with microscale distributions of surface thermal forcing,” Urban Clim., 2014.

    [3] L. Prashad, “Urban Heat Island,” Encycl. Remote Sens., pp. 878–881, 2014.

    [4] H.-Q. Kang, B. Zhu, T. Zhu, J.-L. Sun, and J.-J. Ou, “Impact of Megacity Shanghai on the Urban Heat Island Effects over the Downstream City Kunshan,” Boundary-Layer Meteorol., pp. 1–16, 2014.

    [5] N. L. Alchapar, E. N. Correa, and M. A. Cantón, “Classification of building materials used in the urban envelopes according to their capacity for mitigation of the urban heat island in semiarid zones,” Energy Build., vol. 69, pp. 22–32, 2014.

    [6] K. Menberg, P. Bayer, K. Zosseder, S. Rumohr, and P. Blum, “Subsurface urban heat islands in German cities,” Sci. Total Environ., vol. 442, pp. 123–133, 2013.

    [7] K. Zhu, P. Bayer, P. Grathwohl, and P. Blum, “Groundwater temperature evolution in the subsurface urban heat island of Cologne, Germany,” Hydrol. Process., 2014.

    [8] G. Sinnathamby, H. Gustavsson, L. Korkiala- Tanttu, and C. P. Cervera, “Numerical Analysis of Seasonal Heat Storage Systems of Alternative Geothermal Energy Pile Foundations,” J. Energy Eng., 2014.

    [9] K. J. Doick, A. Peace, and T. R. Hutchings, “The role of one large greenspace in mitigating London’s nocturnal urban heat island,” Sci. Total Environ., vol. 493, pp. 662–671, 2014.

    [10] A. Martilli, “Modelización de los efectos urbanos en modelos meteorológicos,” Tiempo y Clima, vol. 5, no. 13, 2014.

    [11] H. Zhang, Z. Qi, X. Ye, Y. Cai, W. Ma, and M. Chen, “Analysis of land use/land cover change, population shift, and their effects on spatiotemporal patterns of urban heat islands in metropolitan Shanghai, China,” Appl. Geogr., vol. 44, pp. 121–133, 2013.

    [12] L. Zhao, X. Lee, R. B. Smith, and K. Oleson, “Strong contributions of local background climate to urban heat islands,” Nature, vol. 511, no. 7508, pp. 216–219, 2014.

    [13] B. Song and K. Park, “Validation of ASTER Surface Temperature Data with In Situ Measurements to Evaluate Heat Islands in Complex Urban Areas,” Adv. Meteorol., vol. 2014, 2014.

    [14] M. S. Wong and J. E. Nichol, “Spatial variability of frontal area index and its relationship with urban heat island intensity,” Int. J. Remote Sens., vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 885–896, 2013.

    [15] M. Lazzarini, P. R. Marpu, and H. Ghedira, “Temperature land cover interactions: The inversion of urban heat island phenomenon in desert city areas,” Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 130, pp. 136–152, 2013.

    [16] E. Vardoulakis, D. Karamanis, A. Fotiadi, and G. Mihalakakou, “The urban heat island effect in a small Mediterranean city of high summer temperatures and cooling energy demands,” Sol. Energy, vol. 94, pp. 128–144, 2013.

    [17] M. Xiaoyang and X. Feng, “Study on reducing urban heat island effect about ‘White Roofs Plan,’” China Sci. Technol. Inf., vol. 8, p. 17, 2014.

    [18] P. J. C. Schrijvers, H. J. J. Jonker, S. Kenjereš, and S. R. de Roode, “Breakdown of the night time urban heat island energy budget,” Build. Environ., 2014.

    [19] V. Dorer, J. Allegrini, K. Orehounig, P. Moonen, G. Upadhyay, J. Kämpf, and J. Carmeliet, “Modelling the urban microclimate and its impact on the energy demand of buildings and building clusters,” in Proceedings of BS 2013, 2013, no. EPFL-CONF-195745, pp. 3483– 3489

    [20] Z.-H. Wang, E. Bou-Zeid, and J. A. Smith, “A coupled energy transport and hydrological model for urban canopies evaluated using a wireless sensor network,” Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., vol. 139, no. 675, pp. 1643–1657, 2013.

    [21] C.-D. Wu, S.-C. C. Lung, and J.-F. Jan, “Development of a 3-D urbanization index using digital terrain models for surface urban heat island effects,” ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens., vol. 81, pp. 1–11, 2013.

    [22] Q. Weng and P. Fu, “Modeling annual parameters of clear-sky land surface temperature variations and evaluating the impact of cloud cover using time series of Landsat TIR data,” Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 140, pp. 267–278, 2014.

    [23] L. Taheriazad, C. Portillo-Quintero, and A. Sanchez-Azofeifa, “Application of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) to Oil Sands Environmental Monitoring,” 2014.

    [24] C. L. Muller, L. Chapman, C. S. B. Grimmond, D. T. Young, and X. Cai, “Sensors and the city: a review of urban meteorological networks,” Int. J. Climatol., vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 1585–1600, 2013.

    [25] R. Nolz, G. Kammerer, and P. Cepuder, “Calibrating soil water potential sensors integrated into a wireless monitoring network,” Agric. Water Manag., vol. 116, pp. 12–20, 2013.

    [26] T.-Y. Pai, M.-B. Chang, and S.-W. Chen, “Application of Computational Intelligence on Analysis of Air Quality Monitoring Big Data,” in Information Granularity, Big Data, and Computational Intelligence, Springer, 2015, pp. 427–441.

    [27] X. Yu, P. Wu, W. Han, and Z. Zhang, “Overview of wireless underground sensor networks for agriculture,” African J. Biotechnol., vol. 11, no. 17, pp. 3942–3948, 2014.

    [28] X. Yu, P. Wu, W. Han, and Z. Zhang, “A survey on wireless sensor network infrastructure for agriculture,” Comput. Stand. Interfaces, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 59–64, 2013

    [29] H. R. Bogena, M. Herbst, J. A. Huisman, U. Rosenbaum, A. Weuthen, and H. Vereecken, “Potential of wireless sensor networks for measuring soil water content variability,” UNKNOWN, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1002–1013, 2010.

    [30] L. Ruiz-Garcia, L. Lunadei, P. Barreiro, and I. Robla, “A review of wireless sensor technologies and applications in agriculture and food industry: state of the art and current trends,” Sensors, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 4728–4750, 2009.

    [31] P. M. McAllister and C. Y. Chiang, “A practical approach to evaluating natural attenuation of contaminants in ground water,” Groundw. Monit. Remediat., vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 161–173, 1994.

    [32] Y. Kilicaslan, G. Tuna, G. G. Gezer, K. Gulez, O. Arkoc, S. M. Potirakis, and Y. K\il\içaslan, “ANN Based Estimation of Groundwater Quality Using a Wireless Water Quality Network,” Int. J. Distrib. Sens. Networks, vol. 2014, 2014

    [33] J. A. Muñoz Arcentales and V. C. Calero Bravo, “Diseño e Implementación de un Sistema de Riego Inteligente basado en Sensores y Módulos de Radiofrecuencia para Transmisión y Sistema de Control y Módulos de Radiofrecuencia para Transmisión y Sistema de Control,” 2014.

    [34] S. Khriji, D. E. Houssaini, M. W. Jmal, C. Viehweger, M. Abid, and O. Kanoun, “Precision irrigation based on wireless sensor network,” Sci. Meas. Technol. IET, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 98– 106, 2014.

    [35] C. J. Watras, M. Morrow, K. Morrison, S. Scannell, S. Yaziciaglu, J. S. Read, Y.-H. Hu, P. C. Hanson, and T. Kratz, “Evaluation of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for remote wetland monitoring: design and initial results,” Environ. Monit. Assess., vol. 186, no. 2, pp. 919– 934, 2014.

    [36] A. M. Correia, “Use of satellite images landsat 5 tm in identification of islands of heat in the city of Recife-PE,” J. Hyperspectral Remote Sens., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 45–53, 2014.

    [37] P. Coseo and L. Larsen, “How factors of land use/land cover, building configuration, and adjacent heat sources and sinks explain Urban Heat Islands in Chicago,” Landsc. Urban Plan., vol. 125, pp. 117–129, 2014.

    [38] C. Chaiwatpongsakorn, M. Lu, T. C. Keener, and S.-J. Khang, “The Deployment of Carbon Monoxide Wireless Sensor Network (COWSN) for Ambient Air Monitoring,” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 6246–6264, 2014.

    [39] V. Karthikeyan, “Analysis of Water observation Organization Based on GSM and Wireless Sensor Technology.”

    [40] R. P. Barnwal, S. Bharti, S. Misra, and M. S. Obaidat, “UCGNet: wireless sensor network based active aquifer contamination monitoring and control system for underground coal gasification,” Int. J. Commun. Syst., 2014.

    [41] W. Zhan, J. Zhou, W. Ju, M. Li, I. Sandholt, J. Voogt, and C. Yu, “Remotely sensed soil temperatures beneath snow-free skin-surface using thermal observations from tandem polar- orbiting satellites: An analytical three-time- scale model,” Remote Sens. Environ., vol. 143, pp. 1–14, 2014.

    [42] A. Vanjare, S. N. Omkar, and J. Senthilnath, “Satellite Image Processing for Land Use and Land Cover Mapping,” Int. J. Image, Graph. Signal Process., vol. 6, no. 10, p. 18, 2014.

    [43] M. M. Rahman, G. J. Hay, I. Couloigner, and B. Hemachandran, “Transforming Image Objects into Multiscale Fields: A GEOBIA Approach to Mitigate Urban Microclimatic Variability within H-Res Thermal Infrared Airborne Flight- Lines,” Remote Sens., vol. 6, no. 10, pp. 9435–9457, 2014.

    [44] A. A. Masoud, “Predicting salt abundance in slightly saline soils from Landsat ETM imagery using Spectral Mixture Analysis and soil spectrometry,” Geoderma, vol. 217, pp. 45–56, 2014.

    [45] J. Sun, “Exploring edge complexity in remote- sensing vegetation index imageries,” J. Land Use Sci., vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 165–177, 2014.

    [46] O. M. Ramos-González and others, “The green areas of San Juan, Puerto Rico,” Ecol. Soc., vol. 19, no. 3, p. 21, 2014.

    [47] D. Kolokotsa and K. Gobakis, “Spatial distribution of Urban Heat Island using Geographic Information System (GIS) in Greece,” Heat Islands, p. 56, 2014.

    [48] Y. Bai, I. Kaneko, H. Kobayashi, K. Kurihara, I. Takayabu, H. Sasaki, and A. Murata, “A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based approach to adaptation to regional climate change: a case study of Okutama-machi, Tokyo, Japan,” Mitig. Adapt. Strateg. Glob. Chang., vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 589–614, 2014.

    [49] A. Black and H. Stephen, “Relating temperature trends to the normalized difference vegetation index in Las Vegas,” GIScience Remote Sens., vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 468–482, 2014.

    [50] P. Sarricolea Espinoza and J. Martín-Vide, “El estudio de la Isla de Calor Urbana de Superficie del Área Metropolitana de Santiago de Chile con imágenes Terra-MODIS y Análisis de Componentes Principales,” Rev. Geogr. Norte Gd., no. 57, pp. 123–141, 2014.

    [51] J. Wickham, C. Homer, J. Vogelmann, A. Mc- Kerrow, R. Mueller, N. Herold, and J. Coulston, “The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium—20 Years of Development and Integration of USA National Land Cover Data,” Remote Sens., vol. 6, no. 8, pp. 7424–7441, 2014.

    [52] B. Kupfer, N. S. Netanyahu, and I. Shimshoni, “An Efficient SIFT Based Mode-Seeking Algorithm for Sub-Pixel Registration of Remotely Sensed Images,” Geosci. Remote Sens. Lett. IEEE, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 379–383, 2015.

    [53] D. H. Levinson and C. J. Fettig, “Climate change: Overview of data sources, observed and predicted temperature changes, and impacts on public and environmental health,” in Global Climate Change and Public Health, Springer, 2014, pp. 31–49.

    [54] A. M. Dewan and R. J. Corner, “Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Urban Land Surface Temperature,” in Dhaka Megacity, Springer, 2014, pp. 219–238.

    [55] T. M. Giannaros, D. Melas, I. A. Daglis, and I. Keramitsoglou, “Development of an operational modeling system for urban heat islands: an application to Athens, Greece,” Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 347–358, 2014.

    [56] T. H. Woo, “Modified fuzzy algorithm based safety analysis of nuclear energy for sustainable hydrogen production in climate change prevention,” Int. J. Electr. Power Energy Syst., vol. 61, pp. 192–196, 2014.

    [57] J. Pleim, R. Gilliam, W. Appel, J. Godowitch, D. Wong, G. Pouliot, and L. Ran, “Application and Evaluation of High Resolution WRF CMAQ with Simple Urban Parameterization,” in Air Pollution Modeling and its Application XXIII, Springer, 2014, pp. 489–493.

    [58] N. Picone and A. M. Campo, “Comparación urbano rural de parámetros meteorológicos en la ciudad de Tandil, Argentina,” Rev. Climatol., vol. 14, 2014.

    [59] F. I. Paiva and M. E. Zanella, “Microclimas urbanos na área central do bairro da Messejana, Fortaleza/CE.,” Rev. EQUADOR, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 153–172, 2014.

    [60] G. L. Feyisa, K. Dons, and H. Meilby, “Efficiency of parks in mitigating urban heat island effect: An example from Addis Ababa,” Landsc. Urban Plan., vol. 123, pp. 87–95, 2014.

    [61] A. M. Bodzin, D. Anastasio, and V. Kulo, “Designing Google Earth activities for learning Earth and environmental science,” in Teaching Science and Investigating Environmental Issues with Geospatial Technology, Springer, 2014, pp. 213–232.

    [62] K. Krellenberg, R. Jordán, J. Rehner, A. Schwarz, B. Infante, K. Barth, A. Pérez, and others, “Adaptation to climate change in megacities of Latin America: Regional Learning Network of the research project ClimateAdaptationSantiago (CAS),” 2014.

    [63] T. Arola and K. Korkka-Niemi, “The effect of urban heat islands on geothermal potential: examples from Quaternary aquifers in Finland,” Hydrogeol. J., pp. 1–15, 2014.

    [64] M. Maimaitiyiming, A. Ghulam, T. Tiyip, F. Pla, P. Latorre-Carmona, Ü. Halik, M. Sawut, and M. Caetano, “Effects of green space spatial pattern on land surface temperature: Implications for sustainable urban planning and climate change adaptation,” ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens., vol. 89, pp. 59–66, 2014.

    [65] M. Santamouris, C. Cartalis, A. Synnefa, and D. Kolokotsa, “On The Impact of Urban Heat Island and Global Warming on the Power Demand and Electricity Consumption of Buildings- A Review,” Energy Build., 2014.

    [66] S. Ahmed and M. F. Kaiser, “Geo-Environmental Assessment of the Suez Canal Area, using Remote sensing and GIS Techniques,” J. Earth Sci. Geotech. Eng., vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 69–78, 2014.

    [67] H. Wu, L.-P. Ye, W.-Z. Shi, and K. C. Clarke, “Assessing the effects of land use spatial structure on urban heat islands using HJ-1B remote sensing imagery in Wuhan, China,” Int. J. Appl. Earth Obs. Geoinf., vol. 32, pp. 67–78, 2014.

    [68] A. Michopoulos, V. Skoulou, V. Voulgari, A. Tsikaloudaki, and N. A. Kyriakis, “The exploitation of biomass for building space heating in Greece: Energy, environmental and economic considerations,” Energy Convers. Manag., vol. 78, pp. 276–285, 2014

    [69] J. F. Barlow, C. H. Halios, S. E. Lane, and C. R. Wood, “Observations of urban boundary layer structure during a strong urban heat island event,” Environ. Fluid Mech., pp. 1–26, 2014.

    [70] F. J. Gallego, N. Kussul, S. Skakun, O. Kravchenko, A. Shelestov, and O. Kussul, “Efficiency assessment of using satellite data for crop area estimation in Ukraine,” Int. J. Appl. Earth Obs. Geoinf., vol. 29, pp. 22–30, 2014.

    [71] B. S. Razavi, “Predicting the Trend of Land Use Changes Using Artificial Neural Network and Markov Chain Model (Case Study: Kermanshah City),” Res. J. Environ. Earth Sci., vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 215–226, 2014.

    [72] J. Fallmann, S. Emeis, and P. Suppan, “Modeling of the Urban Heat Island and its effect on Air Quality using WRF/WRF Chem Assessment of mitigation strategies for a Central European city,” in Air Pollution Modeling and its Application XXIII, Springer, 2014, pp. 373–377.

    [73] C. M. Waluda, M. J. Dunn, M. L. Curtis, and P. T. Fretwell, “Assessing penguin colony size and distribution using digital mapping and satellite remote sensing,” Polar Biol., pp. 1–7, 2014.

    [74] G. George, “Numerical Modelling and Satellite Remote Sensing as Tools for Research and Management of Marine Fishery Resources,” in Remote Sensing and Modeling, Springer, 2014, pp. 431–452.

    [75] Y. Chen, X. Li, X. Liu, and B. Ai, “Modeling urban land-use dynamics in a fast developing city using the modified logistic cellular automaton with a patch-based simulation strategy,” Int. J. Geogr. Inf. Sci., vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 234–255, 2014.

    [76] O. Corumluoglu and I. Asri, “The effect of urban heat island on Izmir’s city ecosystem and climate,” Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res., pp. 1–10, 2014.

    [77] X. Li, X. Liu, and L. Yu, “A systematic sensitivity analysis of constrained cellular automata model for urban growth simulation based on different transition rules,” Int. J. Geogr. Inf. Sci., vol. 28, no. 7, pp. 1317–1335, 2014.

    [78] F. M. Kreuzer and G. Wilmsmeier, “Eficiencia energética y movilidad en América Latina y el Caribe: Una hoja de ruta para la sostenibilidad,” 2014.

    [79] M. E. Rinaudo Mannucci, “Enfoques sostenibles en el estudio del cambio climatico en America Latina,” Rev. Ciencias Ambient. Y Sostenibilidad CAS, vol. 1, no. 1, 2014.

    [80] L. Tichý, M. Chytrý, Z. Botta-Dukát, L. Tich\`y, and M. Chytr\`y, “Semi-supervised classification of vegetation: preserving the good old units and searching for new ones,” J. Veg. Sci., 2014.

    [81] P. Prabhu, “An Efficient Visual Approach For Automatic Clustering And Validation,” 2014.

Loading...