DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08

Publicado:

2011-01-01

Número:

Vol. 14 Núm. 1 (2011): Enero-Junio

Sección:

Artículos de revisión

Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales

Dendrocronology in the tropics: current and potential applications

Autores/as

  • Jorge Andrés Giraldo Jiménez Grupo de Bosques y Cambio Climático, de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín, calle 59A No 63-20 Núcleo el Volador, Medellín, Colombia.

Palabras clave:

actividad solar, anillos de crecimiento, árboles tropicales, isótopos estables, reconstrucción del clima (es).

Palabras clave:

solar activity, growth rings, tropical trees, stable isotopes, climate reconstruction (en).

Referencias

Acuña-Soto, R., D. Stahle, M. K. Cleveland & M. D. Therrel. 2002. Meghadrought and megadeath in 16th century, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases 8: 360-362.

Argollo, J., C. Soliz & R. Villalba. 2004. Potencialidad dendrocronológica de Polylepis tarapacana en los Andes Centrales de Bolivia. Ecología en Bolivia 39: 5-24.

Bradley, R. S. 1999. Paleoclimatilogy: Reconstructing climates of the quaternary. Academic, San Diego. 613p.

Brienen, R. 2005 Tree rings in the tropics: A study on growth and ages of Bolivian rain forest trees. PROMAB Scientific Series 10. Riberalta. 137 p.

Brienen, R. J. W. & P.A. Zuidema. 2005. Relating tree growth to rainfall in Bolivian rain forests: a test for six species using tree ring analysis. Oecologia 146: 1-12.

Brienen, R., W. W. Wanek & P. Hietz. 2010. Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings indicate improved water use efficiency and drought responses of a tropical dry forest tree species. Trees 25: 103-113.

Boninsegna, J. A., J. Argollo, J. C. Aravena, J. Barichivich, D. Christie, M. E. Ferrero, A. Lara, C. L. Quesne, B. H. Luckman, M. Masiokas, M. Morales, J. M. Oliveira, F. Roig, A. Srur & R. Villalba. 2009. Dendroclimatological reconstructions in South America: A review. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 281: 210-228.

Borgaonkar H. P., A. B. S. Ram & G. B. Pant. 2010. El Niño and related monsoon drought signals in 523-year-long ring width records of teak (Tectona grandis L.F.) trees from south India. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 285: 74-84.

Borman, F. H. & G. Berlyn. 1981. Age and growth rate of tropical trees: New directions for research. Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University Press. New Haven-Connecticut. 137p.

Chartier, M. P., C. M. Rostagno & F.A Roig. 2009. Soil erosion rates in rangelands of northeastern Patagonia: A dendrogeomorphological analysis using exposed shrub roots. Geomorphology 10: 344-351.

Christie, D.A., A. Lara, J. Barichivich, R. Villalba, M.S. Morales & E. Cuq. 2009. El Niño-Southern Oscillation signal in the world's highest-elevation tree-ring chronologies from the Altiplano, Central Andes. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 281: 309-319.

Clark, D. A. 2004. Sources or sinks? The responses of tropical forests to current and future climate and atmospheric composition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 359: 477-491.

Cook, E. & A. Kairiukstis. 1990. Methods of Dendrochronology -Applications in the Environmental Sciences. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Kluwer Academic Publishers. Dordrecht The Netherlands. 394 p.

Cook, E., K. J. Anchukaitis., B. M. Buckley., R. D. D´Arrigo., G. J. Jacoby & W. E. Wright. 2010. Asian moonsoon failture and megadrought during the last millennium. Science 328: 486-489.

Covey, C. & M. Hoffert. 1997. The sun-climate connection: A challenge to conventional wisdom? Climatic Change 37: 387-390.

D'Arrigo, R.D., G.C. Jacoby & P.J. Krusic. 1994. Progress in Dendroclimatic Studies in Indonesia. Journal of TAO (Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanographic) Sciences 5: 349-363.

Davey, S. M., J. R. L. Hoare & K. E. Rumba. 2003. La ordenación forestal sostenible y el enfoque por ecosistemas: Una perspectiva australiana. Unasylva 64: 5-13.

De, J. 2005. Solar forcing of climate: solar variability. Space Science Reviews 120: 197-241.

Dean, W. E. 2000.The sun and climate. U.S. Geological survey fact sheet 0095-00.

Delgado, S. C. 2000. Aplicaciones estadísticas en estudios dendrocronológicos. pp: 79-102 En: Roig. F. A (ed.). Dendrocronología en América latina. EDIUNC. Mendoza, Argentina.

Devall, M. S., B. R. Parresol & S. J. Wright. 1995. Dendroecologycal analysis of Cordia alliodora, Pseudobombax septenatum and Annona spraguei in central Panama. IAWA Journal 16: 411-424.

Díaz, H. & D. Stahle. 2007. Climate and cultural history in the Americas: An overview. Climate Change 83: 1-8.

Douglass, A. E. 1914. A method of estimating rainfall by the growth of trees. Bulleting of the American Geographical Society 46: 321-335.

Dünisch, O., R. Montóia & J. Bauch. 2003. Dendroecological investigations on Swietenia macrophylla King and Cedrela odorata L. (Meliaceae) in the central Amazon. Trees 17: 244-250.

Eddy, J. A. 1976. The Maunder Minimun. Science, New series 192: 1189-1202.

Enquist, B. & J. Leffl er. 2001. Long-term tree ring chronologies from sympatric tropical dry-forest trees: individualistic responses to climatic variation. Journal of Tropical Ecology 17: 41-60.

Evans, M. N. & D. P. Schrag. 2004. A stable isotope-based approach to tropical dendroclimatology. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 68: 32953305.

Fahn, A., J. Burley, K. A. Longman, A. Mariaux & P. B. Tomlinson. 1981. Possible contribution of wood anatomy to the determination of the age of tropical trees. pp.: 31-42. En: Bormann, F.H. & Berlyn, G. (eds.). Age and growth rate of tropical tees: new directions for research. Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Bulletin No. 94. Yale.

Farquhar, G. D., J. R. Ehleringer & K. T. Hubick. 1989. Carbon isotope discrimination and photosynthesis. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 40: 503-537.

Fichtler, E., D. A. Clark & M. Worbes. 2003. Age and long-term growth of trees in an old-growth tropical rain forest, based on analyses of tree rings and 14C. Biotropica 35: 306-317.

Fritts, H. C. 1976. Tree-rings and climate. Academic Press. London. 567 p.

Fröhlich, C. & J. Lean. 1999. The sun's total irradiance: cycles, trends and related climate change uncertainties since 1976. Geophysical Research Letters 25: 4377-4380.

Gage, K. L., T. R. Burkot, R. J. Eisen & E. B. Hayes. 2008. Climate and vector borne diseases. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 35: 436-450.

Gagen, M., D. McCarroll, N.J. Loader & I. Robertson. 2010. Stable isotopes in dendroclimatology: Moving beyond 'Potential', pp: 147-172. En: Hughes, M. , T. W. Swetnam & H. F Diaz (eds.). Dendroclimatology: Progress and Prospects. Springer. New York.

Gärtner, H. 2007. Tree roots-methodological review and new development in dating and quantifying erosive processes. Geomorphology 86: 243-251.

Gil, A. & J. Olcina.1997. Climatología general. Editorial Ariel. Barcelona. 579p.

Gebrekirstos, A., M. Worbes, D. Taketay, M. Fetene & R. Mithlöhner. 2009. Stable carbon isotope ratios in tree rings of co-occurring species from semi-arid tropics in Africa: Patterns and climatic signals. Global and Planetary Change 66: 253-260.

Hitz, O. M., H. Gärtner, I. Heinrich & M. Monbaron. 2008. Application of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) roots to determine erosion rates in mountain torrents. Catena 72: 248-258

Hubber, B. 1952. Tree Physiology. Annual Review of plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 3: 333-346.

Hua, Q., M. Barbetti, G. E. Jacobsen, U. Zoppi & E. M. Lawson. 2000. Bomb radiocarbon in annual tree rings from Thailand and Australia. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms 172: 359-365.

Hughes, M. K. 2002. Dendrochronology Dendrochronología 20: 95-116.

IPCC-Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2007. Climate Change 2007: The physical science basis. Contribution of working group to the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge.

Kaennel, M. & F. H. Schweingruber. 1995. Multilingual glossary of dendrochronology. Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL/FNP. Paul Haupt Publisher. Berne. 463 p.

Kitzberger, T., T. T. Veblen & R. Villalba. 2000. Métodos dendroecológicos y sus aplicaciones en estudios de dinámica de bosques templados de Sudamérica, pp: 17-78 En: Roig F.A. (ed.). Dendrocronología en América latina. EDIUNC. Mendoza.

Kocharov, G. E. 1990. Tree rings: A unique source of information on processes on the earth and space. pp: 289-296. En: Cook, E. & Kairiukstis, A. (eds.). Methods of Dendrochronology-Applications in the Environmental Sciences. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis-Kluwer Academic Publishers. Dordrecht.

Körner, C. 2009. Responses of humid tropical trees to rising Co2. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics 40: 61-79.

Lean, J., J. Beer & R. Bradley. 1995. Reconstruction of solar irradiance since 1610: Implications for climate change. Geophysical Research Letters 22: 3195-3198.

Liese, W. J. 1986. To the memory of Sir Dietrich Brandis. Indian Forester 112: 639-644.

Lisi, C. L., M. Tomazello-Fo, P. C. Botosso, F. A. Roig, V. R. B. Maria, L. Ferreira & A. R. A.Voigt. 2008. Tree-ring formation, radial increment periodicity, and phenology of tree species from a seasonal semi-deciduous forest in Southeast Brazil. IAWA Journal 29: 189-207.

Lloyd, J., & G. Farquhar. 2008. Effects of rising temperatures and (CO2) on the physiology of tropical forest trees. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences 363: 1811-1817.

López, J. L., J. I. Valdez, T. Terrazas & J. R. Valdez. 2006. Anillos de crecimiento y su periodicidad en tres especies tropicales del estado de Colima, México. Agrociencia 40: 533-544.

Luckman, B. H. 2007. Dendroclimatology. Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science 1: 465-475.

McCarroll, D. & N. J. Loader. 2004. Stable isotopes in tree rings. Quaternary Science reviews 23: 771-801.

McCarroll, D. & N.J. Loader. 2005. Isotopes in tree rings, pp: 67-116. En: Leng, M.L. (ed.). Isotopes in Palaeoenvironmental Research. Springer. The Netherlands

Mckenzie, T. A. 1972. Observations on growth and technique for estimating annual growth in Prioria copaifera. Turrialba 22: 353-354.

Mann, M. E., R. S. Bradley & M. K. Hughes. 1998. Global scale temperature patterns and climate forcing over the past six centuries. Nature 392: 779-787.

Mariaux, A. 1967. Les cernes dans les bois tropicaux africains, nature et periodicité. Revue Bois etForêts Des Tropiques 113: 3-14.

Martínez-Ramos, M. & E. R. Alvarez-Buylla 1998. How old are tropical rain forest trees? Trends in Plant Science 3: 400-405.

Menezes, M., U. Berger & M. Worbes. 2003. Annual growth rings and long-term growth patterns of mangrove trees from the Bragança peninsula, North Brazil. Wetlands Ecology and Management 11: 223-242.

Mesa, O. J., G. Poveda & L. F. Carvajal. 1997. Introducción al Clima de Colombia. Medellín, Colombia. 390 p.

Nordemann, D. J. R., N. R. Rigozo & H. H de Faria. 2005. Solar activity and El-Niño signals observed in Brazil and Chile tree ring records. Advances in Space Research 35: 891-896.

Norby, R. J., S. D. Wullschleger, C. A. Gunderson, D. W. Johnson & R. Ceulemans. 1999. Tree responses to rising CO2 in fi eld experiments: implications for the future forest. Plant, Cell and Environment 22: 683-714.

Poussart, P., M. N. Evans, & D. P. Schrag. 2004. Resolving seasonality in tropical trees. Multi-decade, high-resolution oxygen and carbon isotope records from Indonesia end Tahiland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 218: 301-316.

Prodan, M. 1968. Forest Biometrics. Pergamon Press, Headington Hill Hall. Oxford. 447 p.

Pumijumnong, N., D. Eckstein & U. Sass. 1994. Tree-ring research on Tectona grandis in northern Thailand. IAWA Journal 6: 385-392.

Ramírez, J. A. 2007. Relación entre la señal climática de cronologías de Capparis odoratissima JAQ. Y Cercidium praecox (Ruíz & Pavon ex Hook.) HARMS con la variabilidad climática local y global de la Guajira, Colombia. Tesis Magíster en Bosques y Conservación Ambiental, Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medellín. Medellín. 61 p.

Reedy, R. C., J. R. Arnold & D. Lal. 1983. Cosmic-ray record in solar system matter. Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science 33: 505-537.

Rigozo, N. R., D. J. R. Nordemann, E. Echer, A. Zanandrea & W. D. González. 2002. Solar variability effects studied by tree-ring data wavelet analysis. Advances in Space Research. 29: 1985-1988.

Rigozo, N. R., D. J. R. Nordemann, E. Echer & L. E. A. Vieira. 2004. Search for Solar Periodicities in tree-ring widths from Concórdia (S.C., Brazil). Pure and Applied Geophysics 161: 221-233.

Rigozo, N. R., A. Prestes, D. J. R. Nordemann, H. E. da Silva, M. P. Souza Echer & E. Echer. 2008. Solar maximum epoch imprints in tree-ring width from Passo Fundo, Brazil (1741-2004). Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 70:1025-1033.

Robertson, I., S. W. Leavitt, N. J. Loader & W. Buhay. 2008. Progress in isotope dendroclimatology. Chemical Geology 252: EX1-EX4.

Rodríguez, R., A. Mabres, B.H. Luckman, M. Evans-Masiokas & M.K. Ektvedt. 2005. "El Niño" events recorded in dry-forest species of the lowlands of northwest Peru. Dendrochronologia 22: 181-186.

Roig, F.A. 1987. Principios y aplicaciones de la Dendrocronología. Serie Científica 31: 23-30.

Roig F. A., J. J. Jiménez-Osorio, J. Villanueva-Díaz, B. Luckman, H. Tiessen, A. Medina & E. J. Noellemeyer. 2005. Anatomy of growth rings at the Yucatán Peninsula. Dendrochronologia 22: 187-193.

Rozendaal, D. M. 2010. Looking backwards: Using tree rings to evalueate long-term growth patterns of Bolivian forest trees. Programa Manejo de Bosques de la Amazonía Boliviana (PROMAB). Scientific series 12. Riberalta. 150 p.

Rozendaal, D. M. & P. A. Zuidema. 2011. Dendroecology in the tropics: a review. Trees 25: 3-10.

Santiago, L. S., K. Silvera, J. L. Andrade & T. E Dawson. 2005. El uso de isótopos estables en biología tropical. Interciencia 30: 536-542.

Sánchez, L. A., M. Ataroff & R. López. 2002. Soil erosion under different vegetation covers in the Venezuelan Andes. The Enviromentalist 22: 161-172.>

Solíz, C., R. Villalba, J. Argollo, M. S. Morales, D. A. Christie, J. Moya & J. Pacajes. 2009. Spatio-temporal variations in Polylepis tarapacana radial growth across the Bolivian Altiplano during the 20th century. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 281: 296-308.

Soliz, C.C. 2010. Shedding light on tree growth: ring analysis of juvenile tropical trees. Ph.D. thesis. PROMAB Scientific Series 13. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands. 108 p.

Schöngart, J., W. Junk, M. T. Piedade, J. M. Ayress, A. Huttermann & M. Worbes. 2004. Teleconection between tree growth in the Amazonian floodplains and the El Niño-Southern oscillation effect. Global Change Biology 10: 683-692.

Schöngart, J., M. Piedade, F. Wittmann, W. Junk & M. Worbes. 2005. Wood growth patterns of Macrolobium acaciifolium (Benth.) (Fabaceae) in Amazonian black-water and white-water floodplain forests. Oecologia 145: 454-461.

Schöngart, J. 2008. Growth-Oriented Logging (GOL): A new concept towards sustainable forest management in Central Amazonian várzea floodplains. Forest Ecology and Management 256: 46-58.

Studhalter, R. A. 1956. Early history of crossdating. Tree-Ring Bulletin 21: 31-35.

Stuiver, M. & P. D. Quay. 1980. Changes in atmospheric carbon-14 attributed to a variable sun. Science 207: 11-19.

Stuiver, M., A. L. Rebello, J. C. White & W. Broecker. 1981. Isotopic indicators of age/ growth in tropical trees, pp. 72-82. En: Bormann & Berlyn (eds.). Age and growth rate of tropical trees: new directions for research. Yale University Press. New Haven, Connecticut.

Stuiver, M. & G. W. Pearson. 1986. Higth precision calibration of the radiocarbon time scale, AD 1950-500 BC. Radiocarbon 28: 805-838.

Schweingruber, F. H. 1988. Tree-rings: Basics and application of dendrochronology. D. Reidel Publishing Co. Dordrecht. 276 p.

Schweingruber, F. H. 1995. Tree rings and environment Dendroecology. Birmensdorf, Swis Federal institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research. Berne Sttutgart. Viena, Haupt. 609 p.

Turner, I. M. 2004. The Ecology of trees in the tropical rain forest. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 298 p.

Tschinkel, H. M. 1966. Annual growth rings in Cordia alliodora. Turrialba 16: 73-80.

Tomazello, M., P. C, Botosso & C. S. Lisi. 2000. Potencialidade da familia Meliaceae para dendrocronología em regiões tropais e subtropicais, pp: 381-431. En: Roig, F.A. (ed.). Dendrocronología en América latina. EDIUNC. Mendoza.

Tomazello, M., F. A. Roig & P. A. Zevallos. 2009. Dendrocronología y dendroecología tropical: Marco histórico y experiencias exitosas en los países de América Latina. Ecología en Bolivia 44: 73-82.

Velasco, V. M. & B. Mendoza 2008. Assessing the relationship between solar activity and some large scale climatic phenomena. Advances in Space Research 42: 866-878.

Westbrook, J. A., T. P. Guilderson & P. A. Colinvaux. 2006. Annual growth rings in a sample of Hymenaea courbaril. IAWA Journal 27: 193-197.

Williams, A. J. & S. K. Banerjee. 1995. Effect of thermal power plant emissions on the metabolic activities of Mangifera indica and Shorea robusta. Environmental Ecology 13: 914-919.

Wimmer, R. 2001. Arthur Freiherr von Seckendorff-Gudent and the early history of tree-ring crossdating. Dendrochronologia 19: 153-158.

Worbes, M. 1985. Estructural and others adaptations to long-term flooding by trees on Central Amazonia. Amazoniana 9: 459-484.

Worbes, M. 1989. Growth rings, increment and age of trees in inundation forests, savannas and a mountain forest in the Neotropics. IAWA Bulletin 10: 109-122.

Worbes, M. & W. Junk. 1989. Dating tropical trees by means of 14C from bom test. Ecology 70: 503-507.

Worbes, M. 1995. How to measure growth dynamics in tropical trees a review. IAWA Journal 164: 337-351.

Worbes, M. 1999. Annual growth rings, rainfall dependent growth and long-term growth patterns of tropical trees from the Caparo forest reserve in Venezuela. Journal of Ecology 87: 391-403.

Worbes, M. & W. Junk. 1999. How old are tropical trees? The persistence of a myth. IAWA Journal 20: 255-260.

Worbes, M. 2002. One hundred of tree-ring research in the tropics - a brief history and outlook to future challenges. Dendrochronologia 20: 217-231.

Cómo citar

APA

Giraldo Jiménez, J. A. (2011). Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales. Colombia forestal, 14(1), 97–111. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08

ACM

[1]
Giraldo Jiménez, J.A. 2011. Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales. Colombia forestal. 14, 1 (ene. 2011), 97–111. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08.

ACS

(1)
Giraldo Jiménez, J. A. Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales. Colomb. for. 2011, 14, 97-111.

ABNT

GIRALDO JIMÉNEZ, J. A. Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales. Colombia forestal, [S. l.], v. 14, n. 1, p. 97–111, 2011. DOI: 10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/3554. Acesso em: 24 jun. 2021.

Chicago

Giraldo Jiménez, Jorge Andrés. 2011. «Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales». Colombia forestal 14 (1):97-111. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08.

Harvard

Giraldo Jiménez, J. A. (2011) «Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales», Colombia forestal, 14(1), pp. 97–111. doi: 10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08.

IEEE

[1]
J. A. Giraldo Jiménez, «Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales», Colomb. for., vol. 14, n.º 1, pp. 97–111, ene. 2011.

MLA

Giraldo Jiménez, J. A. «Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales». Colombia forestal, vol. 14, n.º 1, enero de 2011, pp. 97-111, doi:10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.1.a08.

Turabian

Giraldo Jiménez, Jorge Andrés. «Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales». Colombia forestal 14, no. 1 (enero 1, 2011): 97–111. Accedido junio 24, 2021. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/3554.

Vancouver

1.
Giraldo Jiménez JA. Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales. Colomb. for. [Internet]. 1 de enero de 2011 [citado 24 de junio de 2021];14(1):97-111. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/3554

Descargar cita

Visitas

1428

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.
Giraldo-Jiménez, J.A. (2011). Dendrocronología en el trópico: aplicaciones actuales y potenciales. Colombia Forestal, 14(1), 97-111.

DENDROCRONOLOGÍA EN EL TRÓPICO: APLICACIONES ACTUALES Y POTENCIALES

Dendrocronology in the tropics: current and potential applications

Dendrocronologia no trópico: aplicações atuais e potenciais

Jorge Andrés Giraldo Jiménez1

1Grupo de Bosques y Cambio Climático, de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellín, calle 59A No 63-20 Núcleo el Volador, Medellín, Colombia. jagiral1@bt.unal.edu.co.

Recepción: Agosto 23 de 2010/Aprobación: Septiembre 10 de 2010

RESUMEN

Los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles son bandas de células producidas por el cambium vascular en un periodo. La existencia de anillos anuales en árboles tropicales ha sido puesta en duda por algunos investigadores. Sin embargo, son muchas las especies de árboles tropicales que forman anillos anuales y que han sido empleadas para reconstruir las condiciones medioambientales pasadas de un sitio. Los primeros estudios dendrocronológicos en el trópico se remontan a finales del siglo XIX. En numerosos países tropicales se han realizado investigaciones dendrocronológicas tanto en climas secos como húmedos, desde el nivel del mar hasta el límite de vegetación arbórea a más de 4000 m de altitud. En este artículo, se presentan los antecedentes de la dendrocronología tanto en las regiones templadas como en el trópico, los principios que rigen esta ciencia, así como las principales aplicaciones. Se mencionan los resultados de muchas experiencias exitosas, a fin de incentivar la aplicación de esta fascinante ciencia en todo el trópico.

Palabras clave: actividad solar, anillos de crecimiento, árboles tropicales, isótopos estables, reconstrucción del clima.

ABSTRACT

Tree rings are bands of cells produced by the vascular cambium in a period of time. The existence of rings in tropical trees has been questioned by several researchers. However, many tropical tree species form annual tree-rings and have been used to reconstruct past environmental conditions of a site. Early dendrochronology studies in the tropics were carried out from late XIX. In most tropical countries, dendrochronologycal researches have been carried out in dry and wet climates, from sea level to the limit of the tree-line over than 4000 m altitude. This paper presents the backgrounds of dendrochronology in temperate and tropical regions, the principles that guide this science and some applications. The results of many successful experiences have been presented in order to encourage the application of this fascinating science in tropical regions.

Key words: solar activity, growth rings, tropical trees, stable isotopes, climate reconstruction

RESUMO

Os anéis de crescimento das árvores são bandas de células produzidas pelo cambium vascular num período. A existencia de anéis anuais nas árvores tropicais tem sido posta em dúvida por alguns pesquisadores. Sem embargo, são muitas as espécies de árvores tropicais que forma anéis anuais e que tem sido empregadas para reconstruir as condições de meio ambiente passadas num lugar. Os primeiros estudos dendrocronológicos no trópico remontam a finais do século XIX. Em numerosos países tropicais se tem realizado investigações dendrocronológicas tanto em climas secos como em úmidos, desde o nível do mar até o limite da vegetação arbórea a mais de 4000m de altitude. Neste artigo, se apresentam os antecedentes da dendrocronología tanto nas regiões temperadas como no trópico, os princípios que regem esta ciência, assim como as principais aplicações. Mencionam-se os resultados de muitas experiências exitosas, a fim de incentivar a aplicação desta fascinante ciência em todo o trópico.

Palavras chave: Atividade solar, anéis de crescimento, árvores tropicais, isótopos estáveis, reconstrução do clima.

INTRODUCCIÓN

Los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles son archivos naturales de las condiciones medioambientales, como: temperatura, precipitación, composición química del aire o del agua, variaciones del crecimiento de la biomasa vegetal, erupciones volcánicas, variaciones geomorfológicas, actividad solar y rayos cósmicos (Reedy et al. 1983, Bradley 1999). Los anillos son bandas de células producidas por el cambium vascular de algunas plantas leñosas durante un periodo (Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995).

Se denomina dendrocronología a la ciencia que estudia los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles, el tiempo de formación y su relación con las condiciones medioambientales pasadas de un sitio. A su vez, es la ciencia que permite datar la madera con anillos anuales de crecimiento (Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995). Muchos fenómenos naturales se entienden mejor desde su pasado, por ello, la dendrocronología es una herramienta útil en ecología, climatología, química, geomorfología, arqueología (Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995, Robertson 2008). La información ambiental se puede obtener del ancho de los anillos, la densidad intraanular de la madera, la densidad de poros y el contenido de isótopos (14C, δ13C δ2H, δ18O), entre otros (Stuiver & Quay 1980, Roig 1987, Schweingruber 1988, Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995, Schweingruber 1996, Poussart et al. 2004, Robertson 2008).

A pesar de las evidencias científicas exitosas sobre la aplicación de la dendrocronología en árboles tropicales (Worbes 1989, 1995, 1999, D´Arrigo et al. 1994, Pumijumnong et al. 1994, Argollo et al. 2004, Schöngart et al. 2004, 2005, Brienen 2005, Lisi et al. 2008, Schöngart 2008, Tomazello et al. 2009, Borgaonkar et al. 2010, Rozendaal & Zuidema 2011), esta idea no es ampliamente compartida por algunos científicos, quizás por prejuicios o desinformación. Por lo anterior, este artículo busca comunicar aspectos importantes de la dendrocronología en el trópico. Asimismo, su principal objetivo es exponer algunas aplicaciones actuales y potenciales de la dendrocronología y sus ventajas al aplicarse en regiones tropicales.

ANTECEDENTES DE LA DENDROCRONOLOGÍA

Desde la antigüedad, el hombre se ha interesado por interpretar los fenómenos del ambiente. Teofrasto (322 a.C), discípulo de Aristóteles, fue aparentemente quien por primera vez estudió el tiempo a partir de la observación de los astros, las nubes, los animales y las plantas (Gil & Olcina 1997). De esta manera, atribuyó la formación de los anillos en la madera de los árboles a la interacción de estos con los fenómenos meteorológicos circundantes (Studhalter 1956). En el siglo XV, Leonardo da Vinci al observar secciones transversales de pinos escribió “Los anillos en los troncos de árboles cortados muestran los años y, según su espesor, años más o menos secos” (Hubber 1952, Schweingruber 1996).

La primera investigación sobre anillos de crecimiento se atribuye a Duhamel y Buffon, en Francia (1737), quienes buscaron explicaciones de la excentricidad de los anillos, su desigual espesor y la formación de la albura (Studhalter 1956, Schweingruber 1988). En 1783, el botánico alemán Burgsdorf adujo que la formación de anillos está acompasada en árboles de la misma especie y la misma localidad. Él observó que las fuertes heladas del invierno entre 1708-1709 se reflejaban en los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles; por esto, Studhalter (1956) lo cataloga como el padre del crossdating (cofechado).

El forestal europeo Georg Ludwig Hartig, uno de los padres de la silvicultura, produjo curvas del volumen de árboles por unidad de área en función de la edad, hasta 210 años; para todo ello, empleó anillos de crecimiento, algunas de sus curvas están reproducidas en Prodan (1968). Theodor Hartig, hijo (1805-1880) estudió las estructuras anatómicas de la madera y la formación de anillos de crecimiento; Robert Hartig (18691901), nieto, publicó varias investigaciones sobre anatomía y la ecología en relación con los anillos de crecimiento, a su vez, empleó los anillos de crecimiento para datar daños provocados a los árboles por granizo, heladas e insectos (Schweingruber 1988, Wimmer 2001, Worbes 2002).

El forestal austriaco Arthur Freiherr von Seckendorff-Gudent (1845-1886) estudió la anualidad y la edad de 6410 árboles de Pinus nigra, colectados en diversas regiones del imperio austro-húngaro; sus observaciones le permitieron establecer secuencias y patrones mediante una técnica que denominó “anillos característicos” hoy conocida como crossdating (Wimmer 2001).

En la actualidad, se reconoce como padre de la ciencia o disciplina de la dendrocronología a Andrew E. Douglass (1867-1962), astrónomo norteamericano, quien, interesado en estudiar la actividad solar y su relación con el clima en la tierra, halló la dependencia entre el espesor de los anillos y la precipitación en árboles de Pinus ponderosa (Douglass 1914). Al mismo tiempo, Bruno Huber (1899-1969), motivado por los problemas planteados por Douglass, desarrolló la dendrocronología en Europa. Ambos fundaron los principios de la dendrocronología moderna dejando al descubierto un nuevo campo de investigación con aplicaciones en arqueología, climatología y geomorfología (Fritts, 1976; Schweingruber 1988).

Aunque las investigaciones dendrocronológicas en el trópico se remontan a más de 100 años (Worbes 2002), en la actualidad, algunos científi cos dudan de la capacidad de los árboles tropicales para formar anillos de crecimiento anuales (Turner 2004). En 1870, el alemán Dietrich Brandis, luego Sir Brandis, conocido como el padre de la silvicultura tropical, realizó el primer estudio dendrocrononológico en el trópico, estudió el crecimiento de la teca (Tectona grandis) y determinó los ciclos de corta con base en los anillos; de este modo, estableció un sistema silvicultural sostenible (Worbes 2002).

En 1923, Coster estudió la actividad del cambium vascular e hizo observaciones fenológicas en muchas especies forestales de Java, para explicar la formación anual de los anillos y su relación con la precipitación. Muchos de los resultados de Coster fueron desconocidos hasta hace poco, pues, al estar publicados en alemán, eran de difícil acceso a la mayoría de científicos que solo leen inglés (Liese 1986, Worbes 2002). Basado en hallazgos hechos por Coster, Berlage, en 1931, realizó en Java la primera reconstrucción de la precipitación con los anillos de Tectona grandis remontándose 415 años atrás, sin duda, la primera reconstrucción climática del trópico (Pumijumnong et al. 1994, Worbes 2002).

Tal vez, la primera especie arbórea de América tropical estudiada fue Cordia alliodora; este estudio fue hecho por César Pérez en 1954 (Tschinkel 1966), quien supuso acertadamente que los anillos eran anuales. Más tarde, Heinrich Tschinkel, demostró la anualidad de los anillos de la misma especie (Tschinkel 1966). Mariaux (1967) fue el primero en plantear un método para demostrar la anualidad de los anillos de crecimiento, el cual consiste en realizar marcas del cambium vascular (heridas), que dejan una cicatriz en la madera con fechas conocidas y luego se corrobora un año o años después, mediante observaciones macro y microscópicas de una sección transversal, o muestra de barreno, tomada a la altura de la herida del árbol en cuestión. Este método es conocido como Ventanas de Mariaux (Worbes 1999, López et al. 2006, Lisi et al. 2008). Con este método. Mariaux determinó la anualidad de los anillos de importantes especies maderables de África tropical. Por su parte, Mckenzie (1972) utilizó la técnica del marcaje del xilema y demostró la formación anual de los anillos de Prioria copaifera. En la actualidad, el método más empleado para verificar la anualidad de los anillos de crecimiento de árboles tropicales es el análisis del contenido de 14C de la madera; este es un marcador isotópico muy importante para datar la fecha de formación de productos orgánicos (Stuiver et al. 1981, Worbes & Junk 1989).

Borman & Berlyn (1981) recopilaron importantes estudios dendrocronológicos enfocados principalmente en el estudio de la edad, las tasas de crecimiento y en probar la existencia de anillos anuales en árboles tropicales, No obstante, tales investigaciones se centraron en resaltar las dificultades del empleo de la dendrocronología en árboles tropicales. Actualmente, se reconoce como la mayor autoridad en el tema al profesor Martin Worbes de la Universidad de Gotinga (Göttingen, Alemania), quien, desde 1985, ha llevado a cabo numerosos estudios dendrocronológicos en lostrópicos América y África.

PRINCIPIOS DE LA DENDROCRONOLOGÍA

El proceso de hacer coincidir patrones de anillos de árboles que crecieron en la misma época, en el mismo sitio, bajo las mismas condiciones medioambientales, se denomina crossdating (datación cruzada o cofechado). Se conoce como el principio más importante en dendrocronología; el cofechado supone que los factores ambientales afectan el crecimiento de todos los árboles de un sitio en forma similar. Es decir, los anillos de los árboles reflejan una respuesta común a un factor ambiental. Una correcta sincronización de los anillos de crecimiento deriva en una adecuada datación de estos (Fritts 1976, Schweingruber 1988, Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995, Luckman 2007).

Las especies se han adaptado y han evolucionado bajo ciertas condiciones que les permiten crecer y desarrollarse normalmente en cierto rango de hábitats; a este concepto se le denomina amplitud ecológica. El principio afirma que los árboles son más sensibles a las variables ambientales (precipitación, temperatura, inundación de las llanuras aluviales, competencia, etc.), en los límites de su amplitud ecológica (Fritts, 1976). Por ejemplo: son límites ecológicos los suelos con baja retención de humedad como los arenosos y los pedregosos, así como sitios anegados donde las condiciones hipóxicas regulan el crecimiento de algunas especies.

El crecimiento individual de un árbol puede descomponerse como una suma de factores de distinta índole (crecimiento agregado). Así, el espesor de un anillo de crecimiento (Rt) en cualquier año (t) se expresa como:

Rt = At + Ct + ΔD1t + ΔD2t + Et

Donde: At es la tendencia ontogénica o forma de crecimiento de la especie influenciada por la edad y el tamaño del árbol; Ct es la influencia de todas las variables climáticas sobre el crecimiento, los deltas están asociados con presencia o ausencia (uno o cero) de disturbios en el bosque o hábitat, pudiendo ser endógenos Dt–por ejemplo, competencia por luz, formación de claros– o exógenos D2t –por ejemplo, ataques de insectos, incendios–; Et es la variabilidad no explicada o error aleatorio, asociada con otras señales.

La señal es la información de interés, se considera ruido a la parte de la información presente en la serie de anillos que no brinda respuestas al problema analizado (Cook & Kairiukstis 1990, Delgado 2000). Por ejemplo, si se desea estudiar el clima, esta será la señal de interés y las demás señales que componen el crecimiento serán consideradas ruido y deberán ser filtradas o reducidas mediante la desestandarización o Detrend, por sus siglas en inglés, en cuyo caso Rt≈Ct (Cook & Kairiukstis 1990, Luckman 2007).

En las plantas, el crecimiento transcurre normalmente, siempre que los factores limitantes lo permitan. Por ejemplo, el anegamiento es normalmente el factor limitante del crecimiento vegetal en llanuras de inundación de los ríos (Worbes 1989, 1995). El déficit hídrico es el factor limitante del crecimiento vegetal en regiones áridas y semiáridas (Fritts 1976, Luckman 2007). La selección del sitio implica conocer o intuir los factores limitantes del crecimiento, que a menudo representan la señal de interés. Además, discernir los factores que definen la sensibilidad de los árboles permite establecer el sitio de muestreo; por ejemplo, si hay interés en estudiar las sequías pasadas se deberían muestrear árboles que crecen en lugares marcadamente secos, lejos de las capas freáticas, donde el suelo tenga baja retención de humedad como cimas de montañas o laderas donde la señal climática se hace máxima. Asimismo, árboles que crecen a elevaciones bajas, en condiciones más húmedas, cerca del nivel freático no formarían anillos sensibles al défi cit hídrico, sino anillos complacientes o anillos de anchura uniforme (Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995).

APLICACIONES DE LA DENDROCRONOLOGÍA EN EL TRÓPICO

ECOLOGÍA

El desconocimiento de las tasas de crecimiento de los árboles tropicales lleva al aprovechamiento insostenible que implica la pérdida parcial o total de la biodiversidad (Davey et al. 2003). Más aún, la conservación de los bosques tropicales es crucial en el ciclo global del carbono, pues estos tienen el potencial de absorber carbono e incorporarlo en su biomasa y suelo (Clark 2004, Shöngart et al. 2008, Körner 2009). Algunos científi cos sugieren que el incremento de CO2 atmosférico estimula el crecimiento de los árboles, lo que resulta con el consiguiente aumento de la biomasa del bosque (Norby et al. 1999, Lloyd & Faquhar 2008, Rozendaal & Zuidema 2011). Determinar las tasas de crecimiento diamétrico de los bosques es el insumo fundamental para cuantificar las tasas de absorción de CO2 en su biomasa; información que también se requiere para la ordenación sostenible de los bosques tropicales. Para tales fines, se han empleado parcelas permanentes, aunque estas implican un sesgo, al considerar solo una fracción de la vida de los árboles.

La dendroecología es una excelente herramienta que permite reconstruir las trayectorias de crecimiento diamétrico de cada árbol durante todo su lapso vital, la historia de disturbios naturales y de origen humano –formación de claros naturales, pulsos de liberación y supresión, incendios y plagas, entre otros– y permite datar la fecha exacta en que se presentaron (Kitzberger et al. 2000, Brienen & Zuidema 2005, Shöngart 2008, Rozendaal 2010, Rozendaal & Zuidema 2011). Temas poco conocidos como la edad, las tasas de crecimiento y la periodicidad del crecimiento de los árboles tropicales han sido estudiados mediante la dendroecología (Worbes 1989, 1995, 1999, Martínez-Ramos & Alvarez-Buylla 1998, Brienen 2005, Soliz 2010).

En la mayoría de las especies de árboles tropicales en las que se ha estudiado la frecuencia de formación de los anillos de crecimiento, estos han resultado anuales; algunas de ellas son: Cedrela odorata, Swietenia macrophylla, Rhizophora mangle, Pseudobombax septenatum, Capparis odoratissima, Parkinsonia praecox, Prioria copaifera, Protium pittieri, Pentaclethra macroloba, Dipteris panamensis, Minquartia guianensis, Simarouba amara, Mangifera indica, Psidium guajaba, Tamarindus indica, Persea americana, Hymenaea courbaril, Tachigali vazquezii, Amburana cearensis y Cedrelinga catenaeformis (Mackenzie 1972, Fahn et al. 1981, Devall et al. 1995, Williams & Banerjee 1995, Fichtler et al. 2003, Dünisch et al. 2003, Menezes et al. 2003, Roig et al. 2005, Brienen 2005, Westbrook et al. 2006, Ramírez 2007).

CLIMATOLOGÍA

El clima define la distribución del agua continental, determina la ubicación de los organismos vegetales, animales y el hombre. La mayoría de asentamientos humanos se han concentrado donde el clima es más favorable. Sin embargo, el clima es fluctuante y de difícil predicción, lo cual puede generar eventos catastróficos fortuitos. Se sabe de culturas movilizadas, abatidas o simplemente extinguidas como producto de cambios climáticos abruptos (Díaz & Stahle, 2007). Los cambios en la precipitación y en la temperatura del aire pueden favorecer el aumento súbito de parásitos que afectan la salud de hombre y los animales. Ese es el caso del dengue, la malaria, la leshmaniasis y la fiebre hemorrágica, entre otras (Gage et al. 2008). Por ejemplo, la muerte de miles de aztecas, tanto antes como después de la llegada de los europeos a México, fue producida por fi ebre hemorrágica. Tales mortandades se correlacionaron con megasequías de varias décadas reconstruidas con cronologías de anillos de árboles de cerca de un milenio de extensión y con pictogramas aztecas, en los que se encontraba la fecha del evento (Acuña-Soto et al. 2002).

Debido a la corta duración de los registros instrumentales, existen limitaciones para la identificación de señales de cambio climático, en especial, eventos de baja y media frecuencia, como el fenómeno ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscilation, en inglés) y de las tendencias seculares que determinan si las variables climáticas aumentan o se reducen a largo plazo por efecto del cambio climático global (Bradley, 1999).

Existe la posibilidad de estudiar el clima antes de la existencia de registros instrumentales mediante los registros indirectos o sustitutivos del clima (Proxy, en inglés) como: anillos de crecimiento de los árboles, polen fósil, anillos de coral, sedimentos laminados (varvas), sedimentos marinos y análisis de los isótopos contenidos en núcleos de hielo o en la madera de los árboles (Mesa et al. 1997, Bradley 1999).

Registros indirectos de resolución anual como anillos de coral solo informan de la temperatura y la salinidad del mar o las varvas que son escasas y difíciles de encontrar tienen desventajas sobre los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles que son fáciles de muestrear, pues se encuentran en casi todos los continentes y rangos latitudinales. Más aún, los árboles son los organismos vivos más longevos de la naturaleza (por ejemplo, Pinus longeava con 4700 años) (Schweingruber, 1988).

El estudio del clima pasado mediante los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles se denomina dendroclimatología (Kaennel & Schweingruber 1995, Schweingruber 1988, 1996, Luckman 2007), la cual durante los últimos 30 años se ha convertido en la herramienta paleoclimática más importante lográndose reconstruir las precipitaciones y temperaturas de los últimos 12.500 años mediante el análisis de madera de árboles vivos y troncos subfósiles extraídos de turberas y de sitios que han permitido su preservación por cientos o miles de años (Hughes, 2002).

Hay un creciente número de estudios de especies tropicales con fines dendrocronológicos, que se centran en demostrar la presencia, periodicidad o características anatómicas de los anillos de crecimiento (Worbes & Junk 1989, Worbes 1989, 1999, 2002, Hua et al. 2000, Tomazello et al. 2000, Westbrook et al. 2006, Boninsegna et al. 2009). También existen algunas pocas cronologías de anillos con las que se han hecho reconstrucciones climáticas locales en el trópico. La primera reconstrucción dendroclimática del trópico fue realizada en Java por Berlage, quien en 1931, reconstruyó 415 años de precipitaciones con anillos de Tectona grandis (Pumijumnong et al. 1994, Worbes 2002). Investigaciones más recientes han logrado relacionar los anillos de crecimiento con los monzones y variaciones del ENSO en la India (D´Arrigo et al. 1994, Pumijumnong et al. 1994, Borgaonkar et al. 2010). Cook et al. (2010) reconstruyeron mil años de los monzones y megasequías en el Asía con anillos de crecimiento, observaron que registros históricos, como el colapso de dinastía Ming, entre otros, fueron precedidos por severas sequías de varias décadas. Sin duda, esta es la reconstrucción dendroclimática más extensa construida hasta ahora en el trópico.

En el altiplano de Bolivia, se observó la alta correlación entre los anillos de crecimiento de Polylepis tarapacana y la precipitación en cronologías de 98 hasta 705 años. En particular, esta es la cronología con anillos de árboles realizada a mayor altitud en el mundo (4000 y 5200 m de elevación; (Argollo et al. 2004, Solíz et al. 2009). Además, Christie et al. (2009) hallaron correlaciones altas entre cronologías de P. tarapacana y los registros del ENSO.

En Mato Grosso (Brasil), Dünisch et al. (2003) encontraron relaciones significativas entre los anillos de Swietenia macrophylla y Cedrela odorata con la precipitación pluvial entre los años 1890 y 2000. Por su parte, Schöngart et al. (2004) estudiaron los anillos de crecimiento de Piranhea trifoliata, una especie que crece bajo ambientes de inundaciones estacionales asociadas con la variación de las descargas del río Amazonas. Los autores encontraron que existe conexión entre el crecimiento de los árboles, el fenómeno El Niño y los ciclos de inundación; además, muestran cómo, en los últimos 200 años, los efectos del ENSO se han hecho cada vez más intensos en la Amazonia. Posteriormente, también en la Amazonia brasileña, Schöngart et al. (2005) usaron Macrolobium acaciifolium, especie que crece en dos tipos de suelos –suelos de várzea inundados periódicamente por aguas blancas, ricas en nutrientes, e igapó, inundados por aguas negras, pobres en nutrientes–. Aunque los dos ambientes están sometidos al mismo régimen de inundación, tanto la edad como la densidad de la madera de M. acaciifolium en los dos ambientes es contrastante. Las cronologías de 150 años (várzea) y 400 años (igapó) correlacionaron significativamente con El Niño, fase cálida del ENSO.

Cerca de la costa norte de Perú, donde el fenómeno ENSO se hace más evidente, allí donde los árboles responden muy bien a la fase lluviosa, Rodríguez et al. (2005) realizaron el primer estudio dendrocronológico de la región: construyeron cronologías cortas de los anillos de Bursera graveolens que muestran respuesta al ENSO durante los últimos cincuenta años.

En un estudio llevado a cabo en Panamá con Cordia alliodora, Pseudobombax septenatum y Annona spraguei, distribuidas en un gradiente de precipitación encontraron fuerte relación entre los índices de anillos con la precipitación y la temperatura (Devall 1995). En Costa Rica, Enquist & Leffer (2001) hallaron relación estadísticamente significativa con la temperatura y la precipitación tanto en Capparis indica como en Genipa americana. La precipitación local reconstruida correlacionó positivamente con el índice SOI (Southern Oscilation Index) y negativamente con respecto a NAO (The North Atlantic Oscilation). En Colombia, Ramírez (2007) obtuvo cronologías cortas de C. odoratissima y P. praecox, que permitieron la reconstrucción climática de la precipitación de la media Guajira. Asimismo, encontró una fuerte correlación entre los índices de anillos con la precipitación (la más alta registrada en la literatura), la temperatura superfi cial del mar, la velocidad del viento y algunos índices del ENSO.

GEOMORFOLOGÍA

La erosión hídrica y eólica del suelo son los principales procesos de erosión natural que afectan la región andina (Sánchez et al. 2002). La tasa de erosión hídrica se ha estudiado con parcelas de escorrentía basadas en la pérdida de suelo en un tiempo determinado. Un método alternativo es la dendrogeomorfología que permite datar y reconstruir los procesos erosivos en lapsos que se extienden desde pocos años hasta centurias. Para ello se emplean las raíces de los árboles expuestas por la erosión (Gärtner 2007, Chartier et al. 2009). Esto es posible, pues la estructura anatómica de los anillos de crecimiento difiere entre el tronco, raíces y ramas. Cuando inicia un proceso erosivo, al tiempo que elimina suelo, descubre parte de las raíces superficiales y la estructura anatómica de los anillos cambia para dejar un marcado contraste que permitirá datar con exactitud el inicio del evento erosivo (Schweingruber 1996, Hitz et al. 2008).

También la dendrogeomorfología permite medir reptación del suelo con los anillos, debido a que los árboles se inclinan, pero luego recuperan su verticalidad. Este punto está marcado en los anillos de la madera. También se puede datar la frecuencia de las avalanchas por las cicatrices dejadas por la abrasión y laceraciones de las rocas en el cambium vascular, las cuales se observan tiempo después como cicatrices en los anillos de los troncos de los árboles (Schweingruber 1996; Kitzberger et al. 2000).

ISÓTOPOS ESTABLES

Los principales constituyentes químicos de las plantas leñosas son carbono, oxígeno e hidrógeno. Estos son tomados de la atmosfera en forma de CO2 (dióxido de carbono) y del suelo en forma de H2O (agua) (McCarroll & Loader 2004, Gagen et al. 2010). Pequeños cambios en la composición química del aire y del agua son captados por las plantas como la proporción de isótopos estables (13C/12C=δ13C, 18O/16O= δ18O, 2H/1H= δD o deuterio) almacenados en su tejido orgánico. Es decir, son archivos de las condiciones medioambientales pasadas, como temperatura, precipitación y humedad relativa, entre otras (McCarroll & Loader 2004, 2005).

La proporción de isótopos estables de una muestra orgánica se mide en un espectrofotómetro de masas y se compara con una referencia estándar. Para el hidrógeno y el oxígeno, la referencia se conoce como Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (Vienna-SMOW); el valor de referencia del carbono se basa en el contenido isotópico de un fósil marino del cretáceo, conocido como Pee Dee Belemnite (PDE) (Schweingruber 1996, McCarroll & Loader 2004, 2005).

Las proporciones muestra y estándar de los isótopos estables se expresan en partes por mil (%): δ(pesado/liviano) = {(δ(pesado/liviano)muestra)/(δ(pesado/liviano)standar)-1}*100, donde la relación pesado/liviano se refiere a 13C/12C, 18O/16O, 2H/1H.

Isótopos de carbono

En la atmósfera, existen dos isótopos estables de carbono, 12C (98,9%) y 13C (1,1%). Ambos se pueden mezclar con el oxígeno y formar CO2 con distinta carga isotópica (12CO2, 13CO2) (Farquhar et al. 1989). En las plantas C3, la fotorespiración depende de la temperatura y de la concentración de CO2. Las mayores tasas de asimilación de CO2 en plantas C3 ocurren cuando la irradiancia y temperatura son bajas. A su vez, cuando los estomas absorben el aire las moléculas de CO2 que incluyen isótopos de carbono livianos (12C) se difunden con mayor facilidad, ya que la rubisco discrimina en contra de los isotopos más pesados (13C) (Farquhar et al. 1989, McCarroll & Loader 2004), pues los isótopos livianos requieren menor energía para formar enlaces químicos (Santiago et al. 2009). Por tanto, las condiciones ambientales como la luz, el agua y la contaminación afectan la cantidad de CO2 tomada por las plantas del aire y pueden ser reconstruidas y estudiadas mediante las proporción de δ13C.

Los combustibles fósiles como el carbón y el petróleo son compuestos empobrecidos en 13C que han aumentado la concentración de CO2 atmosférico, lo cual ha derivado en una reducción del δ13C atmosférico (efecto de dilusión), fenómeno que ha sido captado y almacenado en la madera de las plantas (McCarroll & Loader 2004), es decir el δ13C de la madera es proxy del CO2 atmosférico.

Isótopos de hidrógeno y oxígeno

El hidrógeno y el oxígeno en la madera provienen del agua (H2O) disponible en el suelo y, por tanto, de la precipitación. El contenido isotópico de la planta es igual al de la fuente, pues no existe un fraccionamiento de isótopos por las raíces en el proceso de absorción (Santiago et al. 2005). El agua absorbida del suelo llega a las hojas y la evapotranspiración libera a la atmósfera el hidrógeno y el oxígeno con carga isotópica más liviana (1H y 16O); esto da lugar al enriquecimiento de isótopos de agua más pesados (2H y 18O) (McCarroll & Loader 2004). Finalmente, el agua con esos isótopos se emplea en la formación de la celulosa de los anillos de crecimiento. Así, un simple análisis de la proporción de isótopos de δ18O o δD, en finas porciones de madera, desde el centro del árbol hasta su corteza, permite reconstruir la marcha anual de la precipitación año tras año. Además, el análisis puede ser empleado con árboles que no poseen anillos de crecimiento. Por ejemplo, Evans & Schrag (2004) hallaron correlación entre la acumulación de δ18O en la madera de árboles tropicales y periodos marcadamente secos.

Los isótopos estables de hidrógeno y oxígeno proveen una señal mixta. Existen altas correlaciones entre la temperatura y los isótopos contenidos en la madera, aunque la temperatura tiene un efecto directo en la composición isotópica de la precipitación, también causa un efecto indirecto en el enriquecimiento de isótopos pesados en las plantas por evapotranspiración (McCarroll & Loader 2004, Gagen et al. 2010). Los isótopos de δ13C son un excelente proxy de la precipitación en regiones áridas y semiáridas tropicales, por ejemplo: en México, Brienen et al. (2010) emplearon el contenido de isótopos de δ13C en anillos de crecimiento de Mimosa acanthaloba, para estudiar el CO2 atmosférico y la eficiencia de toma de agua en esa especie. En África tropical, Gebrekirstos et al. (2009) estudiaron en Acacia senegal, Acacia tortilis, Acacia seyal, Balanites aegyptiaca, la relación entre el contenido de δ13C de los anillos, el espesor de los anillos de crecimiento y la precipitación. Encontraron correlaciones inversas, pero signifi cativas entre las cronologías de δ13C, el ancho de los anillos, así como el periodo lluvioso; situación explicada por la reducción de la tasa fotosintética, inducida por el estrés hídrico en las plantas. En Tailandia, Poussart & Schrag (2005) encontraron que los isótopos de δ18O y δ13C extraídos de la madera de Miliusa velutina y Quercus kerri, siguen ciclos regulares que se correlacionan con los momentos de máxima y mínima humedad relativa.

ACTIVIDAD SOLAR Y CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO

Aunque es innegable el actual cambio climático, su origen es controversial, pues muchos científicos afirman que es ocasionado por las actividades antrópicas que generan un incremento de los gases atmosféricos de efecto invernadero desde los inicios de la revolución industrial (IPCC 2007). Otras evidencias indican que tal cambio en el clima no es ocasionado únicamente por la actividad antrópica, sino por fenómenos cíclicos que ocurren cada cientos o miles de años, como lo son las variaciones del ángulo de la tierra con respecto al Sol (ciclos de Milankovitch) e incrementos de la actividad solar (Dean 2000). Lean et al. (1995) hallaron una fuerte relación entre la actividad solar y el incremento de 0.51 ºC de temperatura en el hemisferio norte desde el siglo XVII hasta el presente. En efecto, gran parte de las evidencias de cambio climático se han acopiado con los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles y otras fuentes sustitutivas con resolución anual, como núcleos de hielo y datos históricos (Stuiver & Quay 1980, Stuiver & Pearson, 1986, Lean et al. 1995, Mann et al. 1998, Fröhlich & Lean 1999).

El Sol es la principal fuente de energía de todos los procesos ocurridos en la tierra: crecimiento de las plantas, circulación de las masas de aire, evaporación y temperatura, entre otros fenómenos asociados con el clima. Por tanto, cabría preguntarse si los cambios ocurridos en el sol pudieron haber ocasionado pasados cambios climáticos en la tierra y, a su vez, generarlos en el futuro (Covey & Hoffert 1997). De ahí, han surgido las nuevas discusiones acerca de la posible influencia de la actividad solar de los últimos cien años sobre el actual cambio climático (Rigozo et al. 2008, Velasco 2008).

Los máximos solares se evidencian por la presencia de manchas solares cerca al Ecuador del Sol, presentan ciclos de actividad de once, veintidós y ochenta y ocho años. Por el contrario, un mínimo solar indica ausencia o baja incidencia de manchas solares (De Jager, 2005). Eddy (1976) encontró relación directa entre la pequeña edad de hielo (Mínimo de Maunder) y un mínimo solar. Las temperaturas más bajas coincidieron con la ausencia de manchas solares. Curiosamente, ese periodo coincide con una mayor cantidad de radiocarbono atmosférico registrado en los anillos de los árboles (Stuiver & Quay 1980, Stuiver & Pearson, 1986). Lo anterior es explicable, pues, actividades solares bajas permiten mayor fl ujo de rayos cósmicos galácticos (RCG) que inciden en la tierra y reaccionan químicamente con isotopos de 14N en la atmósfera y producen altas cantidades de 14C atmosférico (Reedy et al. 1983, Kromer 2009), el cual se oxida y en forma de CO2 ingresa a las plantas mediante la fotosíntesis.

Tanto las concentraciones de 14C atmosféricas como los ciclos de manchas solares pasados se almacenan en los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles (Stuiver & Quay 1980). Ambas son señales proxy complementarias de la actividad solar (Stuiver et al. 1986, Rigozo et al. 2008). En este sentido, los anillos de crecimiento de los árboles reflejan la interacción entre la tierra y el espacio mediante fenómenos como la actividad solar, el campo magnético de la tierra, rayos cósmicos y las variaciones climáticas (Kocharov 1990).

Investigaciones recientes han demostrado que Araucaria angustifolia (conífera subtropical) tiene gran potencial para la reconstrucción de máximos solares y sus implicaciones sobre el clima de la tierra (Rigozo et al. 2002, 2004, 2008). Nordemann et al. (2005) encontraron alta relación entre cronologías de anillos con ciclos de once años. Concluyen sobre la alta influencia de los máximos solares en los anillos de crecimiento. Aunque todavía no existen estudios del efecto de las manchas solares en los anillos de árboles tropicales, no se debería dudar de su potencial como respuesta los cambios de la actividad del Sol.

El cambio actual del clima en la Tierra se debe entender desde las condiciones climáticas pasadas, tanto en latitudes altas como en el trópico. Por tanto, los registros proxy del clima y del Sol, construidos con anillos de crecimiento permitirán examinar su variabilidad espacio-temporal y realizar conexiones entre patrones del clima global como ENSO y NOA (North Atlantic Oscilation) para un mejor entendimiento futuro del cambio climático.

AGRADECIMIENTOS

Agradezco especialmente a Flavio Moreno por su insistencia para la realización de este trabajo, a Jorge Ignacio del Valle por su lectura, comentarios y horas de conversaciones que me han permitido aprender sobre este apasionante tema. Gracias a todas las personas que con sus comentarios ayudaron a mejorar el manuscrito.

REFERENCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS

Acuña-Soto, R., D. Stahle, M. K. Cleveland & M. D. Therrel. 2002. Meghadrought and megadeath in 16th century, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases 8: 360-362.

Argollo, J., C. Soliz & R. Villalba. 2004. Potencialidad dendrocronológica de Polylepis tarapacana en los Andes Centrales de Bolivia. Ecología en Bolivia 39: 5-24.

Bradley, R. S. 1999. Paleoclimatilogy: Reconstructing climates of the quaternary. Academic, San Diego. 613p.

Brienen, R. 2005 Tree rings in the tropics: A study on growth and ages of Bolivian rain forest trees. PROMAB Scientific Series 10. Riberalta. 137 p.

Brienen, R. J. W. & P.A. Zuidema. 2005. Relating tree growth to rainfall in Bolivian rain forests: a test for six species using tree ring analysis. Oecologia 146: 1-12.

Brienen, R., W. W. Wanek & P. Hietz. 2010. Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings indicate improved water use efficiency and drought responses of a tropical dry forest tree species. Trees 25: 103-113.

Boninsegna, J. A., J. Argollo, J. C. Aravena, J. Barichivich, D. Christie, M. E. Ferrero, A. Lara, C. L. Quesne, B. H. Luckman, M. Masiokas, M. Morales, J. M. Oliveira, F. Roig, A. Srur & R. Villalba. 2009. Dendroclimatological reconstructions in South America: A review. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 281: 210-228.

Borgaonkar H. P., A. B. S. Ram & G. B. Pant. 2010. El Niño and related monsoon drought signals in 523-year-long ring width records of teak (Tectona grandis L.F.) trees from south India. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 285: 74-84.

Borman, F. H. & G. Berlyn. 1981. Age and growth rate of tropical trees: New directions for research. Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University Press. New Haven-Connecticut. 137p.

Chartier, M. P., C. M. Rostagno & F.A Roig. 2009. Soil erosion rates in rangelands of northeastern Patagonia: A dendrogeomorphological analysis using exposed shrub roots. Geomorphology 10: 344-351.

Christie, D.A., A. Lara, J. Barichivich, R. Villalba, M.S. Morales & E. Cuq. 2009. El Niño-Southern Oscillation signal in the world's highest-elevation tree-ring chronologies from the Altiplano, Central Andes. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 281: 309-319.

Clark, D. A. 2004. Sources or sinks? The responses of tropical forests to current and future climate and atmospheric composition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 359: 477-491.

Cook, E. & A. Kairiukstis. 1990. Methods of Dendrochronology -Applications in the Environmental Sciences. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Kluwer Academic Publishers. Dordrecht The Netherlands. 394 p.

Cook, E., K. J. Anchukaitis., B. M. Buckley., R. D. D´Arrigo., G. J. Jacoby & W. E. Wright. 2010. Asian moonsoon failture and megadrought during the last millennium. Science 328: 486-489.

Covey, C. & M. Hoffert. 1997. The sun-climate connection: A challenge to conventional wisdom? Climatic Change 37: 387-390.

D'Arrigo, R.D., G.C. Jacoby & P.J. Krusic. 1994. Progress in Dendroclimatic Studies in Indonesia. Journal of TAO (Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanographic) Sciences 5: 349-363.

Davey, S. M., J. R. L. Hoare & K. E. Rumba. 2003. La ordenación forestal sostenible y el enfoque por ecosistemas: Una perspectiva australiana. Unasylva 64: 5-13.

De, J. 2005. Solar forcing of climate: solar variability. Space Science Reviews 120: 197-241.

Dean, W. E. 2000.The sun and climate. U.S. Geological survey fact sheet 0095-00.

Delgado, S. C. 2000. Aplicaciones estadísticas en estudios dendrocronológicos. pp: 79-102 En: Roig. F. A (ed.). Dendrocronología en América latina. EDIUNC. Mendoza, Argentina.

Devall, M. S., B. R. Parresol & S. J. Wright. 1995. Dendroecologycal analysis of Cordia alliodora, Pseudobombax septenatum and Annona spraguei in central Panama. IAWA Journal 16: 411-424.

Díaz, H. & D. Stahle. 2007. Climate and cultural history in the Americas: An overview. Climate Change 83: 1-8.

Douglass, A. E. 1914. A method of estimating rainfall by the growth of trees. Bulleting of the American Geographical Society 46: 321-335.

Dünisch, O., R. Montóia & J. Bauch. 2003. Dendroecological investigations on Swietenia macrophylla King and Cedrela odorata L. (Meliaceae) in the central Amazon. Trees 17: 244-250.

Eddy, J. A. 1976. The Maunder Minimun. Science, New series 192: 1189-1202.

Enquist, B. & J. Leffl er. 2001. Long-term tree ring chronologies from sympatric tropical dry-forest trees: individualistic responses to climatic variation. Journal of Tropical Ecology 17: 41-60.

Evans, M. N. & D. P. Schrag. 2004. A stable isotope-based approach to tropical dendroclimatology. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 68: 32953305.

Fahn, A., J. Burley, K. A. Longman, A. Mariaux & P. B. Tomlinson. 1981. Possible contribution of wood anatomy to the determination of the age of tropical trees. pp.: 31-42. En: Bormann, F.H. & Berlyn, G. (eds.). Age and growth rate of tropical tees: new directions for research. Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Bulletin No. 94. Yale.

Farquhar, G. D., J. R. Ehleringer & K. T. Hubick. 1989. Carbon isotope discrimination and photosynthesis. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 40: 503-537.

Fichtler, E., D. A. Clark & M. Worbes. 2003. Age and long-term growth of trees in an old-growth tropical rain forest, based on analyses of tree rings and 14C. Biotropica 35: 306-317.

Fritts, H. C. 1976. Tree-rings and climate. Academic Press. London. 567 p.

Fröhlich, C. & J. Lean. 1999. The sun's total irradiance: cycles, trends and related climate change uncertainties since 1976. Geophysical Research Letters 25: 4377-4380.

Gage, K. L., T. R. Burkot, R. J. Eisen & E. B. Hayes. 2008. Climate and vector borne diseases. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 35: 436-450.

Gagen, M., D. McCarroll, N.J. Loader & I. Robertson. 2010. Stable isotopes in dendroclimatology: Moving beyond 'Potential', pp: 147-172. En: Hughes, M. , T. W. Swetnam & H. F Diaz (eds.). Dendroclimatology: Progress and Prospects. Springer. New York.

Gärtner, H. 2007. Tree roots-methodological review and new development in dating and quantifying erosive processes. Geomorphology 86: 243-251.

Gil, A. & J. Olcina.1997. Climatología general. Editorial Ariel. Barcelona. 579p.

Gebrekirstos, A., M. Worbes, D. Taketay, M. Fetene & R. Mithlöhner. 2009. Stable carbon isotope ratios in tree rings of co-occurring species from semi-arid tropics in Africa: Patterns and climatic signals. Global and Planetary Change 66: 253-260.

Hitz, O. M., H. Gärtner, I. Heinrich & M. Monbaron. 2008. Application of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) roots to determine erosion rates in mountain torrents. Catena 72: 248-258

Hubber, B. 1952. Tree Physiology. Annual Review of plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 3: 333-346.

Hua, Q., M. Barbetti, G. E. Jacobsen, U. Zoppi & E. M. Lawson. 2000. Bomb radiocarbon in annual tree rings from Thailand and Australia. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms 172: 359-365.

Hughes, M. K. 2002. Dendrochronology Dendrochronología 20: 95-116.

IPCC-Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2007. Climate Change 2007: The physical science basis. Contribution of working group to the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge.

Kaennel, M. & F. H. Schweingruber. 1995. Multilingual glossary of dendrochronology. Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL/FNP. Paul Haupt Publisher. Berne. 463 p.

Kitzberger, T., T. T. Veblen & R. Villalba. 2000. Métodos dendroecológicos y sus aplicaciones en estudios de dinámica de bosques templados de Sudamérica, pp: 17-78 En: Roig F.A. (ed.). Dendrocronología en América latina. EDIUNC. Mendoza.

Kocharov, G. E. 1990. Tree rings: A unique source of information on processes on the earth and space. pp: 289-296. En: Cook, E. & Kairiukstis, A. (eds.). Methods of Dendrochronology-Applications in the Environmental Sciences. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis-Kluwer Academic Publishers. Dordrecht.

Körner, C. 2009. Responses of humid tropical trees to rising Co2. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics 40: 61-79.

Lean, J., J. Beer & R. Bradley. 1995. Reconstruction of solar irradiance since 1610: Implications for climate change. Geophysical Research Letters 22: 3195-3198.

Liese, W. J. 1986. To the memory of Sir Dietrich Brandis. Indian Forester 112: 639-644.

Lisi, C. L., M. Tomazello-Fo, P. C. Botosso, F. A. Roig, V. R. B. Maria, L. Ferreira & A. R. A.Voigt. 2008. Tree-ring formation, radial increment periodicity, and phenology of tree species from a seasonal semi-deciduous forest in Southeast Brazil. IAWA Journal 29: 189-207.

Lloyd, J., & G. Farquhar. 2008. Effects of rising temperatures and (CO2) on the physiology of tropical forest trees. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Biological Sciences 363: 1811-1817.

López, J. L., J. I. Valdez, T. Terrazas & J. R. Valdez. 2006. Anillos de crecimiento y su periodicidad en tres especies tropicales del estado de Colima, México. Agrociencia 40: 533-544.

Luckman, B. H. 2007. Dendroclimatology. Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science 1: 465-475.

McCarroll, D. & N. J. Loader. 2004. Stable isotopes in tree rings. Quaternary Science reviews 23: 771-801.

McCarroll, D. & N.J. Loader. 2005. Isotopes in tree rings, pp: 67-116. En: Leng, M.L. (ed.). Isotopes in Palaeoenvironmental Research. Springer. The Netherlands

Mckenzie, T. A. 1972. Observations on growth and technique for estimating annual growth in Prioria copaifera. Turrialba 22: 353-354.

Mann, M. E., R. S. Bradley & M. K. Hughes. 1998. Global scale temperature patterns and climate forcing over the past six centuries. Nature 392: 779-787.

Mariaux, A. 1967. Les cernes dans les bois tropicaux africains, nature et periodicité. Revue Bois etForêts Des Tropiques 113: 3-14.

Martínez-Ramos, M. & E. R. Alvarez-Buylla 1998. How old are tropical rain forest trees? Trends in Plant Science 3: 400-405.

Menezes, M., U. Berger & M. Worbes. 2003. Annual growth rings and long-term growth patterns of mangrove trees from the Bragança peninsula, North Brazil. Wetlands Ecology and Management 11: 223-242.

Mesa, O. J., G. Poveda & L. F. Carvajal. 1997. Introducción al Clima de Colombia. Medellín, Colombia. 390 p.

Nordemann, D. J. R., N. R. Rigozo & H. H de Faria. 2005. Solar activity and El-Niño signals observed in Brazil and Chile tree ring records. Advances in Space Research 35: 891-896.

Norby, R. J., S. D. Wullschleger, C. A. Gunderson, D. W. Johnson & R. Ceulemans. 1999. Tree responses to rising CO2 in fi eld experiments: implications for the future forest. Plant, Cell and Environment 22: 683-714.

Poussart, P., M. N. Evans, & D. P. Schrag. 2004. Resolving seasonality in tropical trees. Multi-decade, high-resolution oxygen and carbon isotope records from Indonesia end Tahiland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 218: 301-316.

Prodan, M. 1968. Forest Biometrics. Pergamon Press, Headington Hill Hall. Oxford. 447 p.

Pumijumnong, N., D. Eckstein & U. Sass. 1994. Tree-ring research on Tectona grandis in northern Thailand. IAWA Journal 6: 385-392.

Ramírez, J. A. 2007. Relación entre la señal climática de cronologías de Capparis odoratissima JAQ. Y Cercidium praecox (Ruíz & Pavon ex Hook.) HARMS con la variabilidad climática local y global de la Guajira, Colombia. Tesis Magíster en Bosques y Conservación Ambiental, Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medellín. Medellín. 61 p.

Reedy, R. C., J. R. Arnold & D. Lal. 1983. Cosmic-ray record in solar system matter. Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science 33: 505-537.

Rigozo, N. R., D. J. R. Nordemann, E. Echer, A. Zanandrea & W. D. González. 2002. Solar variability effects studied by tree-ring data wavelet analysis. Advances in Space Research. 29: 1985-1988.

Rigozo, N. R., D. J. R. Nordemann, E. Echer & L. E. A. Vieira. 2004. Search for Solar Periodicities in tree-ring widths from Concórdia (S.C., Brazil). Pure and Applied Geophysics 161: 221-233.

Rigozo, N. R., A. Prestes, D. J. R. Nordemann, H. E. da Silva, M. P. Souza Echer & E. Echer. 2008. Solar maximum epoch imprints in tree-ring width from Passo Fundo, Brazil (1741-2004). Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 70:1025-1033.

Robertson, I., S. W. Leavitt, N. J. Loader & W. Buhay. 2008. Progress in isotope dendroclimatology. Chemical Geology 252: EX1-EX4.

Rodríguez, R., A. Mabres, B.H. Luckman, M. Evans-Masiokas & M.K. Ektvedt. 2005. "El Niño" events recorded in dry-forest species of the lowlands of northwest Peru. Dendrochronologia 22: 181-186.

Roig, F.A. 1987. Principios y aplicaciones de la Dendrocronología. Serie Científica 31: 23-30.

Roig F. A., J. J. Jiménez-Osorio, J. Villanueva-Díaz, B. Luckman, H. Tiessen, A. Medina & E. J. Noellemeyer. 2005. Anatomy of growth rings at the Yucatán Peninsula. Dendrochronologia 22: 187-193.

Rozendaal, D. M. 2010. Looking backwards: Using tree rings to evalueate long-term growth patterns of Bolivian forest trees. Programa Manejo de Bosques de la Amazonía Boliviana (PROMAB). Scientific series 12. Riberalta. 150 p.

Rozendaal, D. M. & P. A. Zuidema. 2011. Dendroecology in the tropics: a review. Trees 25: 3-10.

Santiago, L. S., K. Silvera, J. L. Andrade & T. E Dawson. 2005. El uso de isótopos estables en biología tropical. Interciencia 30: 536-542.

Sánchez, L. A., M. Ataroff & R. López. 2002. Soil erosion under different vegetation covers in the Venezuelan Andes. The Enviromentalist 22: 161-172.>

Solíz, C., R. Villalba, J. Argollo, M. S. Morales, D. A. Christie, J. Moya & J. Pacajes. 2009. Spatio-temporal variations in Polylepis tarapacana radial growth across the Bolivian Altiplano during the 20th century. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 281: 296-308.

Soliz, C.C. 2010. Shedding light on tree growth: ring analysis of juvenile tropical trees. Ph.D. thesis. PROMAB Scientific Series 13. Utrecht University. Utrecht. The Netherlands. 108 p.

Schöngart, J., W. Junk, M. T. Piedade, J. M. Ayress, A. Huttermann & M. Worbes. 2004. Teleconection between tree growth in the Amazonian floodplains and the El Niño-Southern oscillation effect. Global Change Biology 10: 683-692.

Schöngart, J., M. Piedade, F. Wittmann, W. Junk & M. Worbes. 2005. Wood growth patterns of Macrolobium acaciifolium (Benth.) (Fabaceae) in Amazonian black-water and white-water floodplain forests. Oecologia 145: 454-461.

Schöngart, J. 2008. Growth-Oriented Logging (GOL): A new concept towards sustainable forest management in Central Amazonian várzea floodplains. Forest Ecology and Management 256: 46-58.

Studhalter, R. A. 1956. Early history of crossdating. Tree-Ring Bulletin 21: 31-35.

Stuiver, M. & P. D. Quay. 1980. Changes in atmospheric carbon-14 attributed to a variable sun. Science 207: 11-19.

Stuiver, M., A. L. Rebello, J. C. White & W. Broecker. 1981. Isotopic indicators of age/ growth in tropical trees, pp. 72-82. En: Bormann & Berlyn (eds.). Age and growth rate of tropical trees: new directions for research. Yale University Press. New Haven, Connecticut.

Stuiver, M. & G. W. Pearson. 1986. Higth precision calibration of the radiocarbon time scale, AD 1950-500 BC. Radiocarbon 28: 805-838.

Schweingruber, F. H. 1988. Tree-rings: Basics and application of dendrochronology. D. Reidel Publishing Co. Dordrecht. 276 p.

Schweingruber, F. H. 1995. Tree rings and environment Dendroecology. Birmensdorf, Swis Federal institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research. Berne Sttutgart. Viena, Haupt. 609 p.

Turner, I. M. 2004. The Ecology of trees in the tropical rain forest. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 298 p.

Tschinkel, H. M. 1966. Annual growth rings in Cordia alliodora. Turrialba 16: 73-80.

Tomazello, M., P. C, Botosso & C. S. Lisi. 2000. Potencialidade da familia Meliaceae para dendrocronología em regiões tropais e subtropicais, pp: 381-431. En: Roig, F.A. (ed.). Dendrocronología en América latina. EDIUNC. Mendoza.

Tomazello, M., F. A. Roig & P. A. Zevallos. 2009. Dendrocronología y dendroecología tropical: Marco histórico y experiencias exitosas en los países de América Latina. Ecología en Bolivia 44: 73-82.

Velasco, V. M. & B. Mendoza 2008. Assessing the relationship between solar activity and some large scale climatic phenomena. Advances in Space Research 42: 866-878.

Westbrook, J. A., T. P. Guilderson & P. A. Colinvaux. 2006. Annual growth rings in a sample of Hymenaea courbaril. IAWA Journal 27: 193-197.

Williams, A. J. & S. K. Banerjee. 1995. Effect of thermal power plant emissions on the metabolic activities of Mangifera indica and Shorea robusta. Environmental Ecology 13: 914-919.

Wimmer, R. 2001. Arthur Freiherr von Seckendorff-Gudent and the early history of tree-ring crossdating. Dendrochronologia 19: 153-158.

Worbes, M. 1985. Estructural and others adaptations to long-term flooding by trees on Central Amazonia. Amazoniana 9: 459-484.

Worbes, M. 1989. Growth rings, increment and age of trees in inundation forests, savannas and a mountain forest in the Neotropics. IAWA Bulletin 10: 109-122.

Worbes, M. & W. Junk. 1989. Dating tropical trees by means of 14C from bom test. Ecology 70: 503-507.

Worbes, M. 1995. How to measure growth dynamics in tropical trees a review. IAWA Journal 164: 337-351.

Worbes, M. 1999. Annual growth rings, rainfall dependent growth and long-term growth patterns of tropical trees from the Caparo forest reserve in Venezuela. Journal of Ecology 87: 391-403.

Worbes, M. & W. Junk. 1999. How old are tropical trees? The persistence of a myth. IAWA Journal 20: 255-260.

Worbes, M. 2002. One hundred of tree-ring research in the tropics - a brief history and outlook to future challenges. Dendrochronologia 20: 217-231.