Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión

Plant responses to meteorological events related to climate change - review

Autores/as

  • Adriana Yepes Universidad de San Paulo, San Paulo, Brasil.
  • Marcos Silveira Buckeridge Universidad de San Paulo, San Paulo, Brasil

Palabras clave:

climate change, elevated temperature, elevated CO2, plants. (en).

Palabras clave:

cambio climático, elevada temperatura, elevado CO2, plantas. (es).

Referencias

Aidar, M. P., C. A. Martínez, C. A. Costa, P. M. F. Costa, S. M. C. Dietrich & M. S. Buckeridge. 2002. Effect of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on the establishment of seedlings of jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L. -Leguminosae-Caesalpinioideae). Biota Neotropica 2 (1). Version en línea: [http://www.biotaneotropica.org.br]. Fecha de consulta: 06 de febrero del 2009.

Al-Khatib, K. & G. M. Paulsen. 1999. High-temperature effects on photosynthetic processes in temperate and tropical cereals. Crop Science 39: 119-125.

Albert,K. R., T. N. Mikkelsen, A. Michelsen, H. Ro-Poulsen & L. van der Linden. 2011 Interactive effects of drought, elevated CO2 and warming on photosynthetic capacity and photosystem performance in temperate heath plants. Journal of Plant Physiology 168: 1550-1561.

Ainsworth, E. A., P. A. Davey, C. J. Bernacchi, O. C. Dermody, E. A. Heaton, P. B. Morgan, S. l. Naidu, H-S. Yoo ra, X-G. Zhu, P.S. Curtis & S.P. Long. 2002. A meta analysis of elevated [CO2] effects on soybean (Glycine max) physiology, growth and yield. Global Change Biology 8: 695-709.

Ainsworth, E. A. & S. P. Long. 2005. What have we learned from 15 years of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE)? A meta-analytic review of the responses of photosynthesis, canopy properties and plant production to rising CO2. New Phytologist 165: 351-372

Barton, C. V. M., H. S. J. Lee & P. G. Jarvis. 1993. A branch bag and CO2 control system for long-term CO2 enrichment of mature Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.). Plant, Cell and Environment 16: 1139-1148.

Berry, J. & O. Björkman. 1980. Photosynthetic response and adaptation to temperature in higher plants. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 31: 491-543.

Buchanan, B.B., W. E Gruíssem & R. Jones. 1998. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants. ASPP. 650 p.

Buckeridge, M. S. & S. M. C. Dietrich. 1996. Mobilisation of the raffinose family oligosaccharides and galactomannan in germinating seeds of Sesbania marginata Benth. Plant Science 117: 33-43.

Buckeridge, M. S., H. P. Santos & M. A. S. Tiné. 2000a. Mobilisation of storage cell wall polysaccharides in seeds. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 38: 141-156.

Buckeridge, M. S., M. A. S. Tiné, H. P. Santos & D. U. Lima. 2000b. Polissacarídeos de reserva de parede celular em sementes. Revista Brasileira de FisiologiaVegetal 12: 137-162.

Buckeridge, M. S., S. M. C. Dietrich & D. U. Lima. 2000c. Galactomannans as the reserve carbohydrate in legume seeds, pp.: 283-316. En: Gupta, A.K. & N. Kaur (eds.). Carbohydrate reserves in plants: synthesis and regulation. Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Buckeridge, M. S., H. P. Santos, M. A. Tiné & M. P. M. Aidar. 2004. Mobilização de Reservas, pp.:163-185. En: Gui Ferreira & Fabian Borgheti (eds.). Germinação. Do básico ao aplicado. Alfredo Artmed. Porto Alegre.

Buckeridge, M. S., L. Mortari & M. Machado. 2007. Respostas fisiológicas de plantas às mudanças climáticas: alterações no balanço de carbono nas plantas podem afetar o ecossistema?, pp.: 1-13. En: Gizelda, M. R., R.R.B. Negrelle & L. P. C. Morellato. Fenologia: ferramenta para conservação, melhoramento e manejo de recursos vegetais arbóreos. Colombo.

Buckeridge, M. S. 2008. Seqüestro de carbono, cana-de-açúcar e o efeito Cinderela. Versión en linea: [http://www.comciencia.br/comciencia/?section=8&edicao=23&id=258 .] Fecha de consulta: 10 de diciembre del 2009.

Buckeridge, M. S., M. Aidar, C. Martinez & E. Silva. 2008. Respostas das plantas às mudanças climáticas, pp.: 78-91. En: Buckeridge, M. S. Biologia & as mudanças climáticas. Rima Editora. São Pablo.

Budowski, G. 1965. Distribution of tropical american rain forest species in the light of successional processes. Turrialba 15: 40-42

Costa, P.M. 2004. Efeitos da alta concentração de CO2 sobre o crescimento e o estabelecimento de plântulas do jatobá de mata Hymenaea courbaril l. Var. Stilbocarpa (Heyne). Universidad de Campinas. São Paulo. 88 p.

Crafts-Brandner, S. J., F. J. van de Loo & M. E. Salvucci. 1997. The two forms of Ribulose-1,5Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Acti vase differ in sensitivity to elevated temperature. Plant Physiology 114: 439-444.

Crafts-Brandner, S. J. & M. E. Salvucci. 2000. Rubisco activase constrains the photosynthetic potential of leaves at high temperature and CO2. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 97: 13430-13435.

Drake, B. G., M. A. Gonzalez-Meler & S. P. Long. 1997. More efficient plants: a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2? Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 48: 609-639.

Druart, N., M. Rodríguez-Buey, G. Barron-Gafford, A. Sjödin, R. Bhalerao & V. Hurry. 2006. Molecular targets of elevated [CO2] in leaves and stem of Populus deltoides: implications for future tree growth and carbon sequestration. Functional Plant Biology 33: 121-131.

Farquhar G. D., S. Von Caemmerer & J. A. Berry. 1980. A biochemical model of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in leaves of C3 species. Planta 149: 78-90

Farquhar, G. D. & S. Von Caemmerer. 1982. Modeling of photosynthetic response to environmental conditions, pp.: 549-587 (Vol. 12B). En: Lange, O.L., P.S. Nobel, C.B. Osmond y H. Ziegler (eds.). Physiological Plant Ecology I. Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology New Series. Springer-Verlag. Berlin.

Gaastra, P. 1959. Photosynthesis of crop plantas as influenced by light, carbon dioxide, temperature and stomalatl difussion resistance. Mededelingen Landbou 59: 1-68.

Godoy, J. R. L. 2007. Ecofisiologia do estabelecimento de leguminosas arbóreas da Mata Atlântica, pertencentes a diferentes grupos funcionais, sob atmosfera enriquecida com CO2: uma abordagem sucessional. Informe presentado al Instituto de Botânica. São Paulo. 113 p.

Godoy, O., J. P. de Lemos-Filho & F. Valladares. 2011. Invasive species can handle leaf temperature under water stress than Mediterranean natives. Environmental and Experimental Botany 71: 207-214

Gunderson, C. A., R. J. Norby & S. D. Wullschleger. 2000. Acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration to simulated climatic warming in northern and southern populations of Acer saccharum: laboratory and field experiments. Tree Physiology 20: 87-96.

Haldimann, P. & U. Feller. 2004. Inhibition of photosynthesis by high temperature in oak (Quercus pubescens L.) leaves grown under natural conditions closely correlates with a reversible heat-dependent reduction of the activation state of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Plant, Cell and Environment 27: 1169-1183.

Hall, A. E. 2001. Crop Responses to Environment. CRC Press LLC. Boca Raton. 232 p.

Hikosaka, K., K. Ishikawa, A. Borjigidai, O. Muller & Y. Onoda. 2006. Temperature acclimation of photosynthesis: mechanisms involved in the changes in temperature dependence of photosynthetic rate. Journal of Experimental Botany 57: 291-302.

Houghton, J. T., G. J. Jenkins & J. J. Ephraums (eds.). 1990. Climate Change: The IPCC scientific assesment. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge-New York-Melbourne. 410 p

Houghton, J. T., L. G. Meira Filho, B. A. Callander, N. Harris, A. Kattenberg & K. Maskell (eds.). 1995. Climate Change 1995. The science of Climate Change. The IPCC scientific assesment. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge-New York-Melbourne. 588 p

Houghton, J. T., Y. Ding, D. J. Griggs, M. Noguer, P. J. Van der Linden, X. Dai, K. Maskell, & C. A. Johnson (eds.). 2001. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge-New York. 881 p.

Kinsman, E. A., C. Lewis, M.S. Davies, J.E. Young, D. Francis, B. Vilhar & H.J. Ougham. 1997. Elevated CO2 stimulates cells to divide in grass meristems: a differential effect in two natural populations of Dactylis glomerata. Plant, Cell and Environment 20: 1309-1316.

Körner, C., R. Asshoff, O. Bignucolo, S. Hättenschwiler, S. G. Keel, S. Peláez-Riedl, S. Pepin, R. T. W. Siegwolf & G. Zotz. 2005. Carbon Flux and Growth in Mature Deciduous Forest Trees Exposed to Elevated CO2. Science 309:1360-1362

Kruse, J., I. Hetzger, C. Mai, A. Polle & H. Rennenberg. 2003. Elevated CO2 affects N metabolism of young poplar plants (Populus tremolo XP. alba) differently at defi cient and sufficient N-supply. New Phytologist 157: 65-81.

Lake, J. A., W. P. Quick, D. J. Beerling & F. I. Woodward. 2001. Signals from mature to new leaves. Nature 411: 154-155.

Lake, J. A., F. I. Woodward & W. P. Quick. 2002. Long distance CO2 signaling in plants. Journal of Experimental Botany 53: 183-193.

Lambers, H., S. Chapin & T. Pons. 2008. Plant physiological ecology. Springer. New York. 604 p.

Law, R. & S. J. Crafts-Brandner. 1999 . Inhibition and acclimation of photosynthesis to heat stress is closely correlated with activation of ribulose1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Plant Physiology 120: 173-182.

Lea, P. J. & R. C. Leegood. 1999. Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Chichester. Wiley. 364 p.

Leakey, A. D. B., E. A. Ainsworth, C. J. Bernacchi, A. Rogers, S. Long & D. R. Ort. 2009. Elevated CO2 effects on plant carbon, nitrogen, and water relations: six important lessons from FACE. Journal of Experimental Botany 60: 2859-2876.

Levitt, J. 1980. Responses of plants to environmental stresses. 2nd. edition. V 1: chilling, freezing and high temperature stresses. V 2: water stress, dehydration and drought injury. Academic Press. 607 p.

Long, S. P., E. A. Ainsworth, A. Rogers & D. R. Ort. 2004. Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide: plants FACE the future. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 55: 591-628.

Long, S. P., E. A. Ainsworth, C. J. Bernacchi, P. A. Davey, P. B. Morgan, G. Y. Hymus, A. D. B. Leakey & C. P. Osborne. 2006. Long-term responses of photosynthesis and stomata to elevated [CO2] in managed systems, pp.: 253-270. En: Nösberger J., S.P., Long, R.J. Norby, M. Stitt, G.R. Hendrey, H. Blum (eds.). Managed Ecosystems and CO2. Case Studies, Processes and Perspectives. Springer-Verlag. Heidelberg. 455 p.

Loreto, F., C. Barta, F. Brilli & I. Nogues. 2006. On the induction of volatile organic compound emissions by plants as consequence of wounding or fluctuations of light and temperature. Plant, cell and environment 29: 1820-1828.

Loreto, F. & M. Centritto. 2008. Leaf carbon assimilation in a water-limited world. Plant Biosystems 142: 154-161.

Lovelock, C. E., K. Winter, R. Mersits & M. Popp. 1998. Responses of communities of tropical tree species to elevated CO2 in a forest clearing. Oecologia 116: 207-218.

Marabesi, M. 2007. Efeito do alto CO2 no crescimento inicial e nafisiologia da fotossíntese em plântulas Senna alata (L.) Roxb. Instituto de Botânica. São Paulo. 78 p.

Machado, M. 2007. Estudo bioquímico e da estrutura foliar de plântulas do jatobá da mata (Hymenaea courbaril L.) e do cerrado (Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart.) expostas à concentração elevada de CO2. Universidad de Campinas. São Paulo 102 p.

Metz, B., O. R. Davidson, H. de Coninck, M. Loos & L. Me (eds.). 2005. La captación y el almacenamiento de dióxido de carbono. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 57 p.

Metz, B., O. R. Davidson, P. R. Bosch, R. Dave & L. A. Meyer (eds.). 2007. Contributi on of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Chang. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 841 p.

Miglieta, F., A. Peressotti, F. P. Vaccari, A. Zaldei, P. Deangelis & G. Scarascia- Mugnozza. 2001. Free air carbon dioxide enrichment of a poplar plantation: description and performance of the POPFACE system. New Phytologist 150: 465-476.

Moore, B.D., S.-H. Cheng, D.E Sims, & J. R. Seemann. 1999. The biochemical and molecular basis for photosynthetic acclimation to elevated atmospheric CO2. Plant Cell and Environment 22: 567-589.

Olivo, N., C. A. Martínez & M. A. Oliva. 2002. The photosynthetic response to elevated CO2 in high altitude potato species (Solanum curtilobum). Photosynthetica, Praha 40: 309-313.

ONU. 1998. Protocolo de Kyoto de la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el cambio climático. Naciones Unidas. 25 p.

Parry, M.L., O.F. Canziani, J.P. Paluti kof, P.J. van der Linden & C.E. Hanson (eds.). 2007. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 976 p.

Philips, O. L., Y. Malhi, N. Higuchi, W. F. Laurance, R. M. Núñez, D. J. D. Váxquez, L. V. Laurance, S. G. Ferreira, M. Stern, S. Brown & J. Grace. 1998. Changes in the carbon balance of tropical forests: evidence from long-term plots. Science 282: 439-442.

Poorter, H., Y. Berkel, R. Baxter, J. Hertog, P. Dijkstra, R. M. Gifford, K. L. Griffi n, C. Roumet, J. R. & S. C. Wong. 1997. The effect of elevated CO2 on the chemical composition and construction costs of leaves of 27 C-3 species. Plant Cell and Environment 20: 472-482.

Poorter, H, & M. L. Navas. 2003. Plant growth and competition at elevated CO2: on winners, losers and functional groups. New Phytologist 157: 175-198.

Prentice, I.C. 2001. The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, pp.: 135-237. En: Houghton, J.T.,Y. Ding, D.J. Griggs, M. Noguer, P.J. van der Linden, X. Dai, K. Maskell & C.A. Johnson (eds.). Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York.

Ranasinghe, C. & G. Taylor. 1996. Mechanism for increased leaf growth in elevated CO2. Journal of Experimental Botany 47: 349-358.

Rennenberg, F., A. Loreto, F. Polle, S. Brilli, R. S. Fares Beniwal & Gessler A. 2006. Physiological responses of forest trees to heat and drought. Plant Biology 8: 556-571

Sage, R. F. 1990. A model describing the regulation of ribulose-1,5- bisphosphate carboxylase, electron transport, and triose phosphatesse in response to light-intensity and CO2 in C3 plants. Plant Physiology 94: 1728-1734.

Sage, R & D. Kubien. 2007. The temperature response of C3 and C4 photosynthesis. Plant, Cell and Environment 30: 1086-1106.

Salisbury, F. & F. Ross. 2000. Fisiología de las Plantas. Thompson Editores Spain Paraninfo, S. A. España. 947 p.

Salvucci, M. E. & S. J. Crafts-Brandner. 2004. Mechanisms for deactivation of Rubisco under moderate heat stress. Physiologia Plantarum 122: 513-519.

Sampaio, G., J. Marengo & C. Nobre. 2008. A atmosfera e as Mudanças Climáticas, pp.: 5-28. En: Buckeridge, M.S. (ed.). Biologia & Mudanças Climáticas no Brasil. Rima Editora. São Carlos.

Sawada S., M. Kuninaka, K. Watanabe, A. Sato, H. Kawamura, K. Komine, T. Sakamoto & M. Kasai. 2001. The mechanism to suppress photosynthesis through end-product inhibition in single-rooted soybean leaves during acclimation to CO2 enrichment. Plant and Cell Physiology 42: 1093-1102.

Sharkey, T. D. 1985. Photosynthesis in intact leaves of C3 plants -physics, physiology and rate limitations. Botanical Review 51: 53-105.

Sharkey, T. D., M. Laporte, Y. Lu, S. Weise & APM. Weber. 2004. Engineering plants for elevated CO2: a relationship between starch degradation and sugar sensing. Plant Biology 6: 280-288.

Sharkey, T.D. & S. M. Schrader. 2006. High temperature stress, pp.: 101-129. En: Rao K.V.M., A.S. Raghavendra & K.J. Reddy (eds). Physiology and Molecular Biology of Stress Tolerance in Plants. Springer, Netherlands.

Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor & H.L. Miller (eds.). 2007. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 996 p.

Taiz, L. & E. Zeiger. 2009. Fisiología Vegetal. 3a ed. Artmed. Porto alegre. 581 p.

Turnbull, M. H., R. Murthy & K. L. Griffin. 2002. The relative impacts of daytime and nighttime warming on photosynthetic capacity in Populus deltoides. Plant Cell and Environment 25: 1729-1737.

Von Caemmerer, S. 2000. Biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis. CSIRO, Collingwood. 167p.

Walter, A, R. Feil & U. Schurr. 2002. Restriction of nyctinastic movements and application of tensile forces to leaves affects diurnal patterns of expansion growth. Functional Plant Biology 29: 1247-1258.

Walter, A., M. Christ, G. Barron-Gafford, A. Grieve, R. Murthy & U. Rascher. 2005. The effect of elevated CO2 on diel leaf growth cycle, leaf carbohydrate content and canopy growth performance of Populus deltoides. Global Change Biology 11: 1207-1219.

Watson, R.T., D. L. Albritton, T. Barker, I. A. Bashmakov, O. Canziani, R. Christ, U. Cubasch, O. Davidson, H. Gitay, D. Griggs, K. Halsnaes, J. Houghton, J. House, Z. Kundzewicz, M. Lal, N. Leary, C. Magadza, J. J. McCarthy, J. F. B. Mitchell, J. R. Moreira, M. Munasinghe, I. Noble, R. Pachauri, B. Pittock, M. Prather, R. G. Richels, J. B. Robinson, J. Sathaye, S. Schneider, R. Scholes, T. Stocker, N. Sundararaman, R. T. Taniguchi & D. Zhou. (eds.). 2001. Climate Change 2001: Synthesis Report. A contribution of Working Groups I, II, and III to the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 398 p.

Wu, Y. & D. J. Cosgrove. 2000. Adaptation of roots to low water potentials by changes in cell wall extensibility and cell wall proteins. Journal of Experimental Botany 51: 1543-1553.

Würth, M., K. Winter, & C. H. Körner. 1998. Leaf carbohydrate responses to CO2 enrichment at the top of a tropical forest. Oecología 116: 18-25

Yepes, A. 2010. Desenvolvimento e efeito da concentração atmosférica de CO2 e da temperatura em plantas juvenis de Hymenaea courbaril L. Universidad de São Paulo. Jatobá. 180 p.

Yordanov, I., S. Dilova, R. Petkova, T. Pangelova, V. Goltsev & K. H. Suess. 1986. Mechanisms of the temperature damage and acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus. Photobiochemistry and Photobiophysics 12: 147-155.

Cómo citar

APA

Yepes, A., y Buckeridge, M. S. (2011). Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión. Colombia forestal, 14(2), 213–232. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.2.a06

ACM

[1]
Yepes, A. y Buckeridge, M.S. 2011. Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión. Colombia forestal. 14, 2 (jul. 2011), 213–232. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.2.a06.

ACS

(1)
Yepes, A.; Buckeridge, M. S. Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión. Colomb. for. 2011, 14, 213-232.

ABNT

YEPES, Adriana; BUCKERIDGE, Marcos Silveira. Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión. Colombia forestal, [S. l.], v. 14, n. 2, p. 213–232, 2011. DOI: 10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.2.a06. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/3562. Acesso em: 17 abr. 2024.

Chicago

Yepes, Adriana, y Marcos Silveira Buckeridge. 2011. «Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión». Colombia forestal 14 (2):213-32. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.2.a06.

Harvard

Yepes, A. y Buckeridge, M. S. (2011) «Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión», Colombia forestal, 14(2), pp. 213–232. doi: 10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.2.a06.

IEEE

[1]
A. Yepes y M. S. Buckeridge, «Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión», Colomb. for., vol. 14, n.º 2, pp. 213–232, jul. 2011.

MLA

Yepes, Adriana, y Marcos Silveira Buckeridge. «Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión». Colombia forestal, vol. 14, n.º 2, julio de 2011, pp. 213-32, doi:10.14483/udistrital.jour.colomb.for.2011.2.a06.

Turabian

Yepes, Adriana, y Marcos Silveira Buckeridge. «Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión». Colombia forestal 14, no. 2 (julio 1, 2011): 213–232. Accedido abril 17, 2024. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/3562.

Vancouver

1.
Yepes A, Buckeridge MS. Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión. Colomb. for. [Internet]. 1 de julio de 2011 [citado 17 de abril de 2024];14(2):213-32. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/3562

Descargar cita

Visitas

2645

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.
Yepes, A., & Buckeridge, M.S. (2011). Respuestas de las plantas ante los factores ambientales del cambio climático global - revisión. Colombia Forestal, 14(2), 213-232.

RESPUESTAS DE LAS PLANTAS ANTE LOS FACTORES AMBIENTALES DEL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO GLOBAL - REVISIÓN

Plant responses to meteorological events related to climate change - review

Respostas das plantas anti os fatores ambientais da mudança climática global - revisão

Adriana Yepes1 & Marcos Silveira Buckeridge2

1Universidad de San Paulo, San Paulo, Brasil. adyepes@yahoo.com. Autor para correspondencia
2Universidad de San Paulo, San Paulo, Brasil. msbuck@usp.br

Recepción: Febrero 12 de 2010/Aprobación: Abril 7 de 2011

RESUMEN

El cambio climático global se compone de una serie de eventos meteorológicos que tienen influencia en el funcionamiento de los sistemas naturales; se manifiesta en alteraciones en la biodiversidad de los ecosistemas, en la productividad y fuentes de alimentos y por consiguiente, en la cotidianidad humana. Existe un creciente interés por entender los procesos que componen el cambio climático global y su influencia en la dinámica del ciclo de carbono en los ecosistemas naturales, ya que las plantas son fundamentales en el balance global de este gas, por su capacidad de absorber CO2 mediante la fotosíntesis, secuestrarlo en forma de celulosa o transformarlo en otro tipo de compuesto orgánico. Los estudios de las respuestas de plantas que se desarrollan en altas concentraciones de gas carbónico sugieren que estas condiciones pueden beneficiar el crecimiento de plantas y la productividad en algunas especies, pero se desconoce el efecto combinado de estas variables climáticas cambiantes. En esta revisión serán presentadas generalidades de la ciencia del cambio climático, algunas tecnologías aplicadas para el estudio de su efecto en las plantas y las respuestas de diferentes especies vegetales a las variables ambientales cambiantes. El desarrollo de la investigación básica nos ha permitido redimensionar la influencia de las actividades antropogénicas en el desequilibrio de los sistemas naturales. La interdisciplinariedad e investigaciones asociadas en biología molecular, bioquímica, fisiología, ecología y climatología, entre otros, permitirá contar con una perspectiva más integradora sobre estos eventos, conocimiento fundamental para establecer las líneas de acción y adaptación por parte de gobiernos y de entidades privadas implicadas en su vigilancia y preservación.

Palabras clave: cambio climático, elevada temperatura, elevado CO2, plantas.

ABSTRACT

Climate change is composed of a succession of meteorological processes that alter the performance of the natural systems, such as productivity, food sources, biodiversity and human activities. The natural ecosystems are essential for the global equilibrium, because they contain the bulk of the terrestrial carbon. Plants are important carbon reservoirs, because of their ability to take CO2 through photosynthesis and transform it into organic compounds such as cellulose (carbon sequestration). There is a growing interest to understand the global change process and its relationship with the carbon cycle with plant dynamics. Elevated CO2 concentration in the atmosphere increases leaf photosynthesis, but it is not known whether this enhancement will be maintained over time. In the present work, we review general aspects of climate change science, and some technologies applied to the study of elevated CO2 concentrations effects in plants. Also, physiological and metabolic responses associated to global change, such as high temperature and drought will be described. The inter disciplinarity related to the research associated to molecular biology, biochemistry, physiology, ecology and climatology, to name but a few, will afford the adoption of a more integrated approach of these events. This is crucial for the establishment of future strategies of governments and private companies to face the effects of the global climate changes.

Key words: climate change, elevated temperature, elevated CO2, plants.

RESUMO

A mudança climática global se compõe de eventos meteorológicos que tem influencia no funcionamento dos sistemas naturais; se manifesta com alterações na biodiversidade dos ecosistemas, na produtividade e fontes de alimentos. Existe um crescente interesse por entender os procesos que compõem a mudança climática global e sua influencia na dinámica do ciclo do carbono nos ecosistemas naturais, já que as plantas são fundamentais no balanço global deste gás, or sua capacidade de absorver o CO2, mediante a fotossíntese, sequestra-lo em forma de celulose ou transformá-lo em outro tipo de composto orgânico. Os estudos das respostas das plantas que se desenvolveram em altas concentrações de gás carbónico sugerem que estas condições podem beneficiar o crescimento de plantas e a produtividade de algumas espécies, mas se desconhece o efeito combinado destas variáveis climáticas. Nesta revisão serão apresentadas generalidades da ciencia da mudança climática, algumas tecnologías aplicadas para o estudo do seu efeito nas plantas e as respostas de diferentes espécies vegetais às variáveis ambientais. O desenvolver da investigação permitiu redimensionar a influência das atividades antropogências no desequilíbrio dos sistemas naturais. A interdisciplinariedade e investigações associadas à biología molecular, bioquímica, fisiología, ecologia e climatologia entre outros, o qual permitirá contar com uma perspectiva mais integradora sobre estes eventos, conhecimento fundamental para establecer as linhas de ação e adaptação por parte dos governos e de entidades privadas implicadas na sua vigilância e preservação.

Palavras chave: Mudança climática, temperatura elevada, CO2 elevado, plantas.

CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO ANTROPOGÉNICO

La variación de fenómenos climáticos, como temperatura, patrones de precipitación, nivel del mar, nubosidad en relación con los promedios históricos, es lo que constituye el llamado cambio climático (Prentice 2001). La acumulación de conocimientos en el campo de las ciencias naturales y la meteorología conduce las investigaciones del cambio climático. El clima medio en la tierra está definido por la energía que viene del sol, mientras que las propiedades de la atmósfera y de la tierra determinan si esa energía se refleja, se absorbe o se emite.

La concentración de dióxido de carbono ha acelerado su aumento desde el inicio de las actividades agrícolas primitivas del hombre, 8000 años atrás. En consecuencia, actividades promovidas por el hombre, como el aumento de la deforestación y de la contaminación atmosférica, determinan el cambio climático antropogénico (Sampaio et al. 2008).

En ese sentido, las alteraciones en la composición atmosférica con el aumento en las concentraciones de CO2 y de otros gases de efecto invernadero promueven el calentamiento de la atmósfera. Las emisiones de CO2, metano (CH4), cloro-fl úorcarbonatos CFC (HFC e PFC), óxidos de nitrógeno (NOx) y fluoruros de azufre (SF6) aumentaron en un 70% y representan un potencial de calentamiento de la tierra de 49 Gton de CO2-eq (equivalencia de CO2) (Houghton et al. 2001). CO2-eq es un valor que describe, para una mezcla y cantidad determinada de gas de efecto estufa, la cantidad de CO2 que puede tener el mismo potencial de calentamiento global (GWP en inglés), cuando se mide sobre una escala de tiempo específi ca -generalmente, cien años- (Watson et al. 2001). En el año 2008, las concentraciones de CO2 fueron mayores que en cualquier momento en los últimos 26 millones de años, que alcanzaron aproximadamente 380 ppm, en regiones urbanas, en comparación con los 270 ppm de antes de la Revolución Industrial. Se estima que este valor continuará aumentando, por tanto, se estima que el siglo XXI fi nalizará con concentraciones de aproximadamente 700 ppm (Long et al. 2004).

Con las actuales políticas de mitigación y prácticas de desarrollo sustentable, no concertadas sobre bases de compromiso compartido, las emisiones globales de gases de efecto invernadero continuarán aumentando.

El Panel Intergubernamental del Cambio Climático (IPCC) fue establecido en 1988 por el Programa Ambiental de la Naciones Unidas (UNEP) y la Organización Mundial Meteorológica (OMM), a fin de compilar la información científica, técnica y socioeconómica del cambio climático, especificando su potencial impacto, de cara al establecimiento de alternativas para su mitigación y adaptación. Los grupos de trabajo (W) del IPCC desarrollan investigación en diversas áreas, que incluyen la ciencia del cambio climático (WI), los impactos, adaptaciones y vulnerabilidad (WII), así como los aspectos de mitigación de este (WIII).

De acuerdo con el informe del Grupo de Trabajo I del IPCC, en el 2007, la comprensión del cambio climático ha avanzado junto con los progresos en las otras áreas del conocimiento. A inicios de la década los años setenta, se creía que los únicos elementos determinantes del clima eran el CO2 y las lluvias. Después, se introdujeron otros componentes como la superficie de la Tierra, los casquetes polares y las nubes. En el primer informe FAR (First Assessment Report, Houghton et al. 1990), del IPCC, publicado en 1990, se tuvo en cuenta el aumento del nivel de los océanos como consecuencia del cambio climático. En el segundo informe SAR, (Second Assessment Report, Houghton et al. 1995), publicado en 1996, fueron incluidos la dinámica en los océanos, la actividad volcánica y los sulfatos de origen industrial, estos dos últimos responsables por la lluvia ácida. Luego, en el tercer informe TAR, (Third Assessment Report, , Houghton et al. 2001), publicado en el 2001, se incorporaron como elementos fundamentales los ríos, las emisiones de aerosoles, la circulación de las corrientes oceánicas y el ciclo de carbono. Gracias a estas consideraciones, en el informe del año 2007, la química de la atmósfera y la interacción de la vegetación fueron considerados por primera vez en el cuarto informe del IPCC, AR4 (Solomon et al. 2007). Esta evolución, producto del avance del conocimiento científi co es descrita en la figura 1.

La mitigación y la disminución de las consecuencias de los gases de efecto invernadero son una preocupación general y, en este sentido, en la actualidad, se están desarrollando tecnologías y prácticas ambientalmente limpias en los sectores energético, de transporte, así como en la industria, la agricultura, la gestión forestal y la de residuos (Parry et al. 2007). Así, el IPCC propone que el desarrollo socioeconómico sea orientado para generar mecanismos de adaptación mediante el crecimiento económico, empleando tecnologías que también permitan mitigar las emisiones y las concentraciones de gases de efecto estufa.

Con el Protocolo de Kyoto (ONU 1998) se validó el potencial de los bosques y de las plantas para secuestrar carbono mediante la fotosíntesis y la producción de compuestos de carbono. Estos procesos naturales están dentro de un conjunto de medidas sectoriales ambientalmente efectivas propuestas por el IPCC, en el año 2007 (Solomon et al, 2007; (Figura 2). La producción de biocombustibles, las industrias de alimentos, papel, productos cosméticos y farmacéuticos, los estudios de especies de importancia en la recuperación de áreas degradadas donde actúan como biorremediadoras, la biotransformación de residuos vegetales en energía y productos de interés comercial solo son algunos ejemplos de investigaciones desarrolladas en el contexto de la mitigación de estos desordenes climáticos.

En los escenarios futuros, los aspectos del cambio climático relacionados con el desempeño de las plantas por considerar son:

1. Concentraciones de gases de efecto invernadero, en las cuales la de CO2 es la que más aumenta; Aumento de la temperatura, principalmente, como consecuencia del forzamiento radiactivo de los gases de efecto estufa; Alteración de los patrones de precipitación. El forzamiento radiactivo calienta la superfi cie de la atmósfera y, por tanto, aumenta la evaporación del agua, alterando también la sensación de calor en los seres vivos. La humedad atmosférica, las precipitaciones y la circulación atmosférica generan cambios que afectan todo el sistema. Estos elementos alteran el ciclo hidrológico y la cantidad, frecuencia, intensidad, duración y tipo de precipitación. En regiones del hemisferio norte, está cayendo más lluvia y nieve. Sin embargo, en los eventos de lluvia fuerte, la cantidad total de precipitación ha disminuido; esta condición se asocia a un aumento de vapor de agua en la atmósfera proveniente de los océanos cálidos, lo que aumenta la ocurrencia de sequía e inundaciones (Metz et al. 2007). Estos eventos han sido relacionados con la interacción de contaminantes, como aerosoles, con las nubes.

2. Aumento en las concentraciones de ozono y su interacción con otros gases. Los niveles de concentración de gas carbónico y de la temperatura de la superficie de la tierra están definidos por los diferentes escenarios de emisión. En el escenario menos favorable, se prevé una concentración de CO2 de 790 ppm y un aumento de temperatura de + 4 °C para el año 2100 (Solomon et al. 2007). Es importante tener en cuenta que los datos ambientales mayormente usados para los modelos que se elaboran en la actualidad provienen principalmente de estaciones meteorológicas localizadas en regiones con estaciones en el hemisferio norte y en regiones pobladas.

Como una opción del paquete de medidas de mitigación para la estabilización de las concentraciones atmosféricas de los gases de efecto invernadero, en el informe presentado por el WI-IPCC (Metz et al. 2005) se considera la captación y el almacenamiento de dióxido de carbono (CAC). La CAC constituye una línea de investigación que consiste en la separación de CO2 emitido por las industrias y las diversas fuentes, así como su transporte a un lugar de almacenamiento (fosas petroleras ya explotadas, zonas de grandes profundidad en el mar) para garantizar su aislamiento de la atmósfera. Una vez más, la interdisciplinariedad es un elemento fundamental para entender la variabilidad de las diferentes propuestas en el sentido de comprender los efectos que ese gas puede generar en los sistemas acuáticos y terrestres al ser convertidos en reservorios artificiales de este.

EL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO Y LAS PLANTAS

Existe un creciente interés por entender el cambio climático global y su influencia en la dinámica del ciclo de carbono en las plantas. Los ecosistemas naturales son fundamentales en el balance global, como depósitos de carbono atmosférico.

Los cultivos y la vegetación natural crecen y se adaptan a sistemas con rápidas transformaciones en el tiempo. Así, la conveniencia en predecir la productividad primaria neta ha restablecido el interés en los estudios de la fotosíntesis, a fi n de evaluar cambios en la asimilación fotosintética de CO2 en los diferentes procesos vegetales. El papel del ciclo de carbono es fundamental, por ejemplo, en los procesos de construcción y en los movilización de polisacáridos de la pared celular, como un mecanismo de reserva en semillas (Buckeridge & Dietrich 1996, Buckeridge et al. 2000a, b, c, 2004).

Los estudios de las respuestas de plantas que se desarrollan en lugares con altas concentraciones de gas carbónico sugieren que estas condiciones pueden beneficiar su crecimiento. Sin embargo, las interacciones con otros factores, como la temperatura y la disponibilidad de nutrientes, alteran el aumento de la fotosíntesis (Turnbull et al. 2002, Kruse et al. 2003, Walter et al. 2005), constituyendo estas condiciones el nuevo foco de estudio.

FOTOSÍNTESIS

El CO2 es utilizado por las plantas para hacer fotosíntesis, que es el proceso por el cual las plantas producen compuestos orgánicos usados para su crecimiento y desarrollo. Aproximadamente, el 40% de la masa seca de las plantas consiste en carbono fijado mediante la fotosíntesis. Una vez que los productos de la fotosíntesis son convertidos en celulosa, se habla de secuestro de carbono (Buckeridge 2008). Este último y su distribución en la biomasa de las plantas son considerados una de las herramientas más promisorias para la minimización de los efectos perjudiciales del efecto invernadero. Se estima que los biomas terrestres retiran cerca de 2 GT -2 billones de toneladas de carbono- por año de la atmósfera (Philips et al. 1998). De hecho, existen dos abordajes básicos en relación con el secuestro de carbono:

Protección de los ecosistemas que acumulan carbono, favoreciendo el mantenimiento y el incremento del secuestro., y Manipulación de ecosistemas -selección y plantación de especies, bioingeniería y mejoramiento genético- a fin de elevar su fijación de carbono.

La fotosíntesis, definida en forma sencilla es la transformación del CO2 de la atmósfera en compuestos orgánicos (sacarosa, almidón, celulosa), gracias a la energía lumínica. Los procesos primarios de la fotosíntesis ocurren en el cloroplasto, donde se distinguen tres pasos (Taiz & Zeiger 2009):

1. Absorción de fotones por pigmentos, principalmente clorofilas;

2. Transporte de electrones derivados del rompimiento de una molécula de agua, con la producción simultánea de oxígeno, a lo largo de la cadena transportadora de electrones, lo que produce moléculas donadoras de electrones: NADPH y ATP;

3. Ciclo de Calvin: uso de las moléculas de NADPH y ATP en la reacción de reducción de CO2, lo que lleva a la síntesis de compuestos de tres carbonos, triosas fosfato (Lambers et al. 2008), que se intercambian entre el cloroplasto y el citosol por Pi (fósforo inorgánico) y dan lugar por diferentes rutas metabólicas a la producción de polisacáridos como almidón o celulosa, así como de esqueletos de carbono para otras reacciones de biosíntesis. La reducción del CO2 junto con una molécula del trisacárido RuBP (ribulosa bifosfato) es catalizada por la enzima Rubisco (Ribulosa1,5-bifosfato carboxilasa-oxigenasa), siendo esta proteína una de las moléculas más estudiadas y un indicador del desempeño fotosintético de la planta.

Las tasas de asimilación de fotosíntesis disminuyen cuando la demanda de carbohidratos en la planta se reduce -como en la pérdida de órganos vertedero-. En su mayoría, la distribución de los productos de la fotosíntesis se hace por medio de la exportación de triosas fosfato desde el cloroplasto intercambiando Pi, para sintetizar sacarosa en el citoplasma de las hojas fuente y exportarla para los órganos dreno. La concentración de Pi es la que controla la distribución de estos productos: si la concentración de Pi es alta, se intercambia por triosa fosfato y se produce sacarosa para exportar; si la concentración de Pi disminuye, se aumentan las triosas fosfato en el cloroplasto para producir almidón.

El crecimiento en las plantas está íntimamente ligado con el balance en las rutas metabólicas que controlan, por ejemplo, la producción de sacarosa (transporte para crecimiento) o la producción de almidón (reserva), sincronizadas entre sí y con su ritmo circadiano. Así, alteraciones en las condiciones ambientales suelen producir cambios en los modelos de crecimiento de las plantas.

Modelos de estudio de la fotosíntesis

Al finalizar la década de los años cincuenta, se comenzaron a desarrollar mediciones de intercambio gaseoso foliar, con análisis de la asimilación y tasas de intercambio de presión de vapor de hojas individuales bajo diferentes condiciones ambientales (Von Caemmerer 2000). Se encontraron diferencias en la resistencia del estoma y del mesófilo; y se observó también que a baja presión parcial de CO2, la incorporación de este gas estaba limitada por el proceso de difusión (Gaastra 1959). La bioquímica de la hoja tiene una influencia importante en la tasa de fi jación de CO2, así como la concentración de O2, debido a la doble función de la rubisco: carboxigenación y oxigenación. Estos procesos intentan ser explicados por modelos bioquímicos de la fotosíntesis, cuyas descripciones están vinculadas a ecuaciones de tasas de carboxilación u oxidación de la rubisco y permiten un conocimiento del estado interno de la planta (Farquhar et al. 1980, Farquhar & Von Caemmerer 1982).

De esta forma, la comunidad científica está usando herramientas no invasivas para la estimación de parámetros bioquímicos in-vivo. Los analizadores de gas por infrarrojo (IRGA; Figura 3) permiten hacer mediciones en tiempo real de tasas de asimilación del CO2 en la fotosíntesis (A), tasa de transpiración de la hoja (E), conductancia estomática (gS) y fracción molar intercelular de CO2 (Ci) (Long et al. 2006).

La A tiene comportamientos característicos sobre diferentes concentraciones de CO2 y sobre diferentes niveles de irradiación, lo que genera curvas de CO2 (Figura 4) y curvas de luz (Figura 5), respectivamente, que constituyen una valiosa herramienta para comprender el comportamiento fisiológico y las respuestas bioquímicas de las plantas sobre diversas condiciones ambientales.

La A en hojas de plantas C3, en diferentes concentraciones de CO2, generalmente, se caracteriza por estar sobre el control de tres procesos diferentes: la capacidad de la rubisco de consumir RuBP, la capacidad del ciclo de Calvin y de las reacciones de los tilacoides de regenerar RuBP y la capacidad de consumir triosas-P y regenerar Pi para la fotofosforilación en los procesos de síntesis de almidón y de sacarosa (Figura 4) (Long et al. 2004).

Por otra parte, está la capacidad de regeneración de RuBP se afecta por la captura de luz y es limitante en intensidades de esta no saturantes en todas las concentraciones de CO2 (Sage 1990). Así, en condiciones de saturación de luz, temperaturas moderadas (25° a 30° C°) y alta concentración de CO2, la regeneración de RuBP, lo mismo que la regeneración de Pi limitan la asimilación (A) (Sharkey 1985).

Otro tipo de análisis no invasivos son las mediciones de la fluorescencia de la clorola. La eciencia quántica del fotosistema II, obtenida mediante la relación FV/FM es una medida muy útil del desempeño fotosintético de la planta estudiada, que provee una visión de las tasas de la transformación fotoquímica de la energía lumínica.

Todas y cada una de estas metodologías nos permiten entender y dimensionar mejor la fisiología de las plantas. Es importante tener en cuenta que muchos de los resultados de estudios publicados nos dan a conocer el estado de la planta bajo una determinada fase de desarrollo, hora del día (ritmo circadiano) o bajo condiciones ambientales particulares; lo anterior hacer que podamos entender, cada vez más, el funcionamiento de las plantas. En la actualidad, técnicas de biología molecular y genética que permiten la alteración de caracteres individuales de la planta admiten nuevas preguntas sobre crecimiento vegetal y fotosíntesis, para que sean respondidas en ecofisiología.

TECNOLOGÍAS USADAS EN LOS ESTUDIOS DEL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO EN PLANTAS

Teniendo en cuenta la importancia que ha cobrado el conocimiento de las respuestas de las plantas en ambientes enriquecidos con CO2, se han desarrollado sistemas para el crecimiento y el estudio de ellas en estas condiciones. Actualmente se cuenta con sistemas enriquecedores de aire con CO2, FACEs (Free Air CO2 Enrichment), bolsas para ramas (branch bags), cámaras de cultivo y cámaras de techo abierto (CTA). Todos estos sistemas tecnológicos son válidos, eficientes y se usan en dependencia del objetivo trazado en la investigación.

SISTEMAS FACE

Son torres de metal, que pueden alcanzar 30 m de altura, dispuestas en forma de anillo y mantienen en su interior una zona circular con un diámetro de 10 a 20 m. De las torres parten tubos que las unen, los que fumigan constantemente CO2 dentro del área de estudio (Miglietta et al. 2001). La ventaja de este sistema es que los estudios pueden ser desarrollados in situ en bosques naturales, en plantaciones con vegetación madura o en zonas de cultivos agrícolas, pudiéndose estudiar así el efecto del CO2 en cualquier etapa de crecimiento de los árboles y cultivos. Entre las limitaciones de esta técnica, se encuentra que las concentraciones de CO2 máximas que se alcanzan están aproximadamente en 550 ppm y las inversiones en infraestructura y mantenimiento de estos sistemas son muy elevadas.

BOLSAS PARA RAMAS

Se componen de envoltorios plásticos, transparentes, usados para inyectar concentraciones conocidas de CO2 en ramas específicas de las plantas estudiadas (Barton et al.1993), dejando así el resto de la planta en una atmósfera con concentración de CO2 diferente.

CÁMARAS DE CULTIVO

Son salones que constituyen recintos de crecimiento y se construyen especialmente para controlar las condiciones ambientales como luminosidad, humedad, temperatura y concentración de CO2.

CÁMARAS DE TECHO ABIERTO (CTA)

Comprenden pequeños cilindros de metal, cerrados en los laterales por capas de plástico o policarbonato transparente, con protección UV y abertura en la parte superior. El CO2 es inyectado por una válvula solenoide en un compartimento donde es mezclado con aire, usando un ventilador. Posteriormente, este aire enriquecido es distribuido por toda la cámara hasta alcanzar la concentración deseada y uniforme. Dentro de las CTA son colocadas las plantas de estudio. La ventaja de este sistema es que en ellas se consigue alcanzar concentraciones de CO2 de hasta a 1000 ppm, además de ser un método más económico que los FACES (Figura 6).

FACTORES DE ESTRÉS RESULTANTES DEL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO

Las interacciones de la plantas con factores ambientales como la irradiación, la temperatura, la disponibilidad de nutrientes, la relación fuentedreno alteran el aumento de las tasas de asimilación observadas en altas presiones parciales de CO2, siendo estas condiciones un nuevo foco de estudio en el escenario del calentamiento global.

Las condiciones desfavorables para el crecimiento, desarrollo y productividad son consideradas factores de estrés; tales factores pueden ser de naturaleza biótica o abiótica, por exceso o por defecto. La definición de estrés dada por Levitt (1980) se refiere a “cualquier factor, elemento o agente, potencialmente desfavorable a los seres vivos, capaz de generar un cambio o disminución en el desempeño fisiológico, metabólico o molecular que no ocasione su muerte”.

De conformidad con Salisbury & Ross (2000), un estrés ambiental significa que parte del potencial del ambiente difiere del potencial del organismo, de manera que existe una fuerza que conduce materia o energía dentro o fuera de él, que desencadena estrés y una respuesta a él. Lambers et al. (2008) describen las respuestas de las plantas a los factores de estrés en una escala de tiempo. Por consiguiente, después de un estímulo negativo de horas o de días, el desempeño fisiológico de la planta disminuye. Con el tiempo, la planta mejora o recupera poco a poco su desempeño, aclimatándose. En generaciones o tiempo evolutivo, se pueden observar adaptaciones y procesos de compensación homeostática.

De acuerdo con los temas hasta ahora desarrollados, las condiciones ambientales más generalizadas en las últimas décadas como producto del cambio climático son el aumento de concentraciones de CO2 y la interacción con otros gases contaminantes como el ozono O3, el aumento de la temperatura media y la modificación de los patrones de precipitación. Este escenario adverso se transformó en un conjunto de factores de estrés. Las plantas son estudiadas para conocer sus respuestas en estas condiciones, teniendo en cuenta su importancia en la mitigación con su potencial para fijar y secuestrar el CO2.

TEMPERATURA

La temperatura es uno de los principales controladores de la distribución y productividad de las plantas, con efectos importantes en la actividad fisiológica en todas las escalas temporales y espaciales (Budowski 1965, Sage & Kubien 2007). El calor es necesario para la vida; cada proceso vital y cada nivel de desarrollo están limitados a un rango de temperatura. Las plantas terrestres están adaptadas a temperaturas entre 5° C y 40° C, dentro de las cuales ocurre producción de masa seca y crecimiento. En el caso particular de las especies tropicales y subtropicales, las temperaturas óptimas están entre 15° C y 35° C, encontrándose, obviamente, una variación de temperaturas y su adaptación a ellas debida a la altitud.

Las temperaturas diurnas pueden tener efectos lesivos, relacionados con el calentamiento del tejido, o efectos indirectos asociados a déficits hídricos de la planta, que pueden aumentar la demanda de evaporación. Las plantas pueden adquirir termotolerancia, si son sometidas a un aumento de temperatura no letal por algunas horas antes de encontrarse en condiciones de choque térmico. Una planta aclimatada puede sobrevivir ante exposiciones a temperaturas que podrían, en caso contrario, ser letales. El proceso de aclimatación tiene que involucrar la síntesis de nuevas proteínas en respuesta a la temperatura alta, que confieren termotolerancia al organismo (Hall 2001). Las plantas que son expuestas al exceso de calor muestran características metabólicas y celulares particulares. Cuando las plantas son sometidas a temperaturas, por lo menos 5° C arriba de su temperatura óptima de crecimiento, una señal de estrés por calor es activada, lo que disminuye la síntesis de proteínas normales y acelera la trascripción de las proteínas de choque térmico (heat shock proteins, HSP). Los niveles de estas proteínas pueden aumentar en circunstancias temporales y de desarrollo, con resultados como el cese de crecimiento, daño de órganos y hasta la muerte. Aun, en el campo, en condiciones naturales de alta irradiación y en plántulas germinadas en suelo caliente, la transcripción de HSP puede aumentar en hojas, con lo cual se disminuye la transpiración y la se produce cierre estomático (Hall 2001, Buchanan et al. 1998).

Durante el estado vegetativo, las temperaturas altas pueden dañar los componentes fotosintéticos de la hoja y reducen las tasas de asimilación de dióxido de carbono, en comparación con los ambientes que tienen temperaturas óptimas. La sensibilidad de la fotosíntesis al calor, se debe principalmente al daño de los componentes del fotosistema II (membranas de tilacoides del cloroplasto) y a la alteración en las propiedades de la membrana (Berry & Björkman, 1980, Al-Khatib & Paulsen, 1999). Estudios comparativos de respuestas al calor indican que el fotosistema II de especies de regiones estacionales es más sensible al calor que especies de climas tropicales, adaptadas a temperaturas más altas (Al-Khatib & Paulsen 1999, Yordanov et al. 1986, Hikosaka et al. 2006).

La mayoría de las especies se puede aclimatar a la temperatura modificando su aparato fotosintético, de manera que mejore el desempeño en el nuevo ambiente de crecimiento (Law & Crafts-Brandner 1999, Crafts-Brandner et al. 1997, Crafts-Brandner & Salvucci 2000, Salvucci & Crafts-Brandner 2004).

Plantas de especies vegetales con fotosíntesis C3 experimentan la competencia de la carboxilación y oxidación de la rubisco: la temperatura óptima para la fotosíntesis deriva de la diferencia entre la temperatura de disolución del oxígeno y del gas carbónico en el mesófilo, ya que al aumentar la temperatura disminuye la solubilidad del CO2, lo que aumenta la actividad oxigenasa de la rubisco, es decir, las altas temperaturas inhiben la fotosíntesis (Lea & Leegood 1999). Por su parte, Haldimann & Feller (2004) encontraron que la fotosíntesis de Quercus pubescens puede, de hecho, ser afectada temporalmente por una reducción del estado de activación de la rubisco. Esto puede mostrar que el aparato fotosintético en su conjunto probablemente fue afectado negativamente por la onda de calor del 2003, en ausencia de mecanismos de adaptación o aclimatación a eventos fuera de temporada, como pérdida de hojas, diferenciación histológica o estructural (Rennenberg et al. 2006). En este periodo, cuando subió la temperatura hasta 5° C, no como un evento episódico y sí a lo largo de los meses de verano, los bosques de Europa central mostraron una rápida adaptación a las altas temperaturas. En mediciones hechas por Rennenberg et al. (2006), se evaluó la conductancia de CO2 en cuatro especies de árboles, antes, durante y después de este evento. Estas mediciones confirmaron una disminución sustancial de la conductancia del mesófilo y del estoma, lo que redujo la concentración de CO2 en el cloroplasto. Por tanto, la desactivación de la rubisco puede, de hecho, ser originada por la poca cantidad de CO2 disponible en los cloroplastos. No es posible determinar si la reducción de la difusión en la conductancia es causada por el estrés a causa del calor, por estrés hídrico o a causa de una combinación de ambos (Rennenberg et al. 2006). Gunderson et al. (2000) observaron que la fotosíntesis y la respiración de Acer sacchrum presentó una adaptación rápida a 4° C de diferencia en la temperatura, de 27° C a 31° C.

Loreto et al. (2006) observaron la emisión de compuestos orgánicos volátiles (COV) en algunas especies de plantas estresadas por alta temperatura, pero la biosíntesis y el control ambiental sobre la emisión todavía no están claros. COV como isopreno, (E)-2-hexanal -producto de desnaturalización de membranas lipídicas-, fueron liberadas en hojas de Phragmites australis expuestas a altas temperaturas (45° C) y a alta intensidad de luz.

Por su parte, Sage & Kubien (2007) describieron la respuesta de A a la temperatura y encontraron que en niveles altos de CO2 y temperaturas menores a la óptima, el factor limitante es la regeneración de Pi, mientras que en temperaturas superiores a la óptima, los limitantes eran el transporte de electrones y la propia actividad de la rubisco-activasa.

En los ecosistemas, el calentamiento puede alterar casi todas sus propiedades: composición vegetal, tasas de crecimiento, estructura y arquitectura del dosel, ensombramiento y profundidad de las raíces. Estos efectos serán más complejos, en el tiempo y en el espacio que solo la respuesta a alto CO2 (Loreto & Centritto 2008). Se espera que las altas temperaturas exacerben la influencia negativa de los diferentes estreses ambientales.

ESTRÉS HÍDRICO

El estrés hídrico se puede referir al déficit o al exceso de agua (inundaciones). Aquí nos referimos al estrés por déficit hídrico. Los conceptos sequía y déficit hídrico pueden conducir a equívocos conceptuales; sequía se refiere a una condición meteorológica de ausencia de lluvias y que puede ser tolerada por todas las plantas que la sobreviven. Déficit hídrico se refiere a que el contenido de agua de un tejido o célula está abajo del contenido de agua más alto, exhibido en el estado de mayor hidratación (Taiz & Zeiger 2009).

Las condiciones de sequía o potenciales hídricos bajos en el ambiente de una planta proporcionan una fuerza conducente a la pérdida de agua. Para resistir estas condiciones, las plantas han creado diferentes estrategias por medio de la evitación y de la tolerancia (Levitt 1980). Las plantas pueden retardar la deshidratación o mantener la hidratación del tejido, economizando agua o teniendo que consumirla en grandes cantidades, para lo cual necesita contar con un sistema radicular que se lo permita. Otro mecanismo es la tolerancia a la deshidratación, que es la capacidad de funcionar estando deshidratada. También se tienen algunas especies que escapan de la deshidratación y que completan su ciclo durante la estación húmeda, antes del inicio de la seca.

Se tienen diferentes tipos de plantas, de acuerdo con el agua disponible, según Salisbury & Ross (2000): hidrófitas, plantas que crecen donde hay abundante agua; mesófitas, donde hay mediana disponibilidad de agua; xerófitas, donde hay poca agua; glicófitas, que crecen en agua dulce y halófitas: plantas que crecen en agua salada.

La productividad de las plantas depende de la cantidad disponible de agua y de la eficiencia del organismo en el uso de ella. El agua puede limitar el crecimiento y la productividad de plantas mesófitas, debido a periodos secos inesperados o a una situación de lluvia baja, lo que hace necesario el riego adicional. Dentro de las estrategias de aclimatación al déficit hídrico, está la inhibición de la expansión foliar, aumento de la profundización de las raíces abscisión foliar y cierre estomático. En las actividades dependientes de la turgencia celular, la expansión foliar y el alongamiento radicular son los más sensibles al déficit hídrico. En un periodo de sequia, la parte aérea de una planta continuará creciendo hasta que la absorción de agua por los pelos absorbentes de la raíz se torne limitante. La disminución del contenido de agua en las hojas genera una disminución del volumen celular, de la presión de turgencia, esto promueve que las paredes celulares se aflojen, disminuyendo la expansión foliar. La relación de biomasa raíz: parte aérea, parece estar gobernada por un balance entre el agua absorbida por las raíces y la fotosíntesis de la parte aérea. Esto significa que los productos fotosintéticos que no son usados para el crecimiento foliar son acumulados en las extremidades de las raíces que crecen en busca de agua (Taiz & Zeiger 2009, Lambers 2008, Salisbury & Ross 2000).

El área foliar de las plantas va cambiando una vez sus hojas alcanzan la madurez. Si la planta sufre un estrés hídrico después que su área foliar se ha desarrollado, la planta pierde hojas, en gran parte, debido a la síntesis y sensibilidad al etileno. Una de las respuestas encontradas ante eventos de estrés hídrico es el aumento de la concentración de ácido abscísico (ABA) en hojas, comparado con las raíces, de manera que esta hormona promueve el cierre estomático, mientras disminuye la transpiración y mejora la eficiencia del uso del agua. Esta hormona puede ser controlada o disipada mediante varios mecanismos que disminuyen el crecimiento y el metabolismo, preservando los recursos que sirven para su recuperación. Otras respuestas identificadas al estrés hídrico son: el depósito de cera sobre la superficie foliar, que hace de la cutícula una capa espesa, para disminuir la pérdida de agua por la epidermis; y la disipación de energía sobre las hojas, que genera cambios en el tamaño y orientación de las hojas (Taiz & Zeiger 2009, Lambers et al. 2008, Salisbury & Ross 2000).

ATMÓSFERA ENRIQUECIDA POR CO2

La respuesta de las plantas a una atmósfera enriquecida con CO2 se puede observar en diferentes aspectos de la fisiología de las plantas. Lovelock et al. (1998) observaron que es posible correlacionar respuestas a la atmósfera enriquecida con CO2, a partir del grupo de sucesión al que pertenezcan las plantas. Por consiguiente, especies pioneras o de sucesión secundaria intermediaria presentaron mayores tasas de asimilación de CO2 y mayor producción de almidón, comparadas con especies clímax. La elevada producción de carbohidratos no estructurales está correlacionada con una alta relación fuente/vertedero (Würth et al. 1998).

Una mayor presión de CO2 en la atmósfera tiene el potencial de aumentar la actividad fotosintética y disminuir la fotorespiración mediante la disminución de la actividad oxigenasa de la rubisco. Otros procesos verificados son la reducción de la conductancia estomática, el aumento de la eficiencia del uso del agua -relación entre la cantidad de CO2 asimilada por agua transpirada- y de la razón C/N o carbono/nitrógeno (Lovelock et al. 1998; Ainsworth et al. 2002, Aidar et al. 2002, Long et al 2004, Ainsworth & Long. 2005, Buckeridge et al. 2007, Buckeridge et al. 2008, Leakey et al. 2009).

Algunos otros procesos que se han mostrado alterados por la atmósfera enriquecida con CO2, son los siguientes.

Índice y densidad estomática

El número de estomas está fuertemente controlado por señales ambientales que incluyen la luz y las presiones parciales de CO2. El desarrollo celular de la epidermis durante la fase temprana del crecimiento foliar, involucra cambios tanto en la densidad de la células de la superfi cie como en la proporción de células que se destinan a ser estomas (Lake et al. 2001, 2002). Dentro de los cambios, estos científicos observaron el papel de ácidos grasos de cadenas largas en la comunicación célula a célula y encontraron en plantas de Arabidopsis evidencias de señalización a larga distancia de hojas maduras para modifi car, tanto la densidad como el índice estomático en las hojas jóvenes que se estaban expandiendo (Lake et al. 2001).

Al estudiar los efectos interactivos de periodos de estrés hídrico, aumento de temperatura y elevadas concentraciones de CO2 mediante análisis multivariado, fue encontrado que estos factores afectan negativamente procesos de desempeño fisiológico de una forma que no se puede apreciar en análisis simples (Albert et al. 2011). La interacción de estos factores depende de las estrategias de crecimiento de las plantas estudiadas y de su capacidad de adaptarse a las condiciones de falta de agua, como es el caso de especies invasoras con tolerancia térmica del fotosistema II (Godoy et al. 2011).

Fotosíntesis y biomasa

Al contar con mayores presiones parciales de CO2, en general, es observado un aumento en las tasas de asimilación neta de CO2 y de biomasa (Aidar et al. 2002, Olivo et al. 2002, Costa 2004, Godoy 2007, Marabesi 2007). Poorter & Navas (2003) compararon y comprobaron un aumento del 45% de biomasa en especies de herbáceas C3, 48% en arbóreas C3, 23 % en plantas CAM y 12% en plantas C4 que crecieron en alto CO2. Aunque no se sabe a ciencia cierta cuáles son los procesos responsables en plantas C4, se ha observado un aumento en la fotosíntesis y, por consiguiente, un incremento en la tasa de crecimiento asociado a condiciones de estrés hídrico para maíz (Leakey et al. 2009).

Un aumento en biomasa es la expresión de procesos en el ámbito celular, como división y expansión celular. Con respecto a la división celular, Kinsman et al. (1997) observaron en dos poblaciones de Dactylis glomerata una disminución de la duración del ciclo celular de hasta un 26% en plantas que crecen en condiciones de alto CO2. Con respecto a la expansión celular, Ranasinghe & Taylor (1996) estudiaron que el crecimiento de hojas de Phaselous vulgaris ocurre en exposiciones a alto CO2 en la fase de expansión celular, en la que se observó un aumento de la actividad la enzima XTH (xiloglucano transglicosidasa-hidrolasa), responsable de romper y reconstruir cadenas de xiloglucanos, por lo que es considerada una enzima importante en el proceso de control de la pared celular (Wu & Cosgrove 2000). Este aumento en la actividad de la XTH también fue observado en hojas jóvenes de Populus deltoides (Druart et al. 2006).

Conductancia estomática

Simulaciones apuntan a efectos benéficos del cambio climático en la hoja en ambientes con alto CO2 al producir un aumento de la fotosíntesis y un mejor uso del agua, debido al cierre estomático.

Metabolismo de carbono

El carbono que entra en las plantas, después del proceso de fotosíntesis, puede ser transformado en carbohidratos estructurales y en carbohidratos no estructurales. Con respecto a carbohidratos estructurales, se ha observado aumento en celulosa en metáfilos y tallo de Hymenaeae courbaril, de plantas que crecieron en atmósfera enriquecida con CO2. Este aumento en celulosa se ha correlacionado con una disminución en el contenido de lignina en Fagus y Quercus litter (Körner 2005).

El efecto más destacado de las altas concentraciones de CO2 con respecto a los metabolitos es un incremento en las concentraciones de carbohidratos no estructurales como almidón, sacarosa, glucosa y fructosa (Poorter et al. 1997). La relación entre las concentraciones (pool) de metabolitos en las hojas y el crecimiento de las hojas es complejo, pero al final determina el área foliar y el crecimiento vegetal. Los carbohidratos son utilizados como sustratos para procesos de crecimiento tales como extensión de la pared celular y para la respiración que proporciona energía para procesos metabólicos involucrados en el crecimiento. La glucosa es la llave metabólica porque es la unidad estructural de la celulosa, del almidón y es el sustrato de la respiración. Las concentraciones de glucosa, de fructosa y de sacarosa están intercomunicadas, ya que representan la forma de transporte central entre fuente y vertedero (Walter et al. 2005): la disminución de la concentración de glucosa puede afectar los procesos celulares y de expansión.

Reducción en su actividad fotosintética

También se ha observado que las plantas se aclimatan a las altas concentraciones de CO2, por medio de la reducción en su actividad fotosintética, que generalmente es asociada a un aumento en carbohidratos solubles y almidón en hojas (Drake et al. 1997) y a una disminución del contenido de nitrógeno foliar. Más recientemente, se ha pensado que la conversión de almidón a sacarosa contribuye a promover la vía sugar-sensing: (Sharkey et al. 2004). Sugar sensing es la expresión sintética, en inglés, que describe la capacidad que tienen las plantas de sentir las formas y los niveles de azúcar, así como la influencia de estos en su expresión genética. Otros estudios sugieren que la acumulación de grandes granos de almidón en los cloroplastos de hojas con altas concentraciones de CO2 (Figura 7) pueden afectar la integridad de los cloroplastos o impedir la difusión de CO2, desde los espacios intercelulares al estroma del cloroplasto (Sawada et al. 2001). En este sentido, se ha encontrado en algunas hojas incrementos en el contenido de almidón sobre altas concentraciones de CO2 (Machado 2007, Buckeridge et al. 2007) y de sacarosa en plantas de interés agronómico como soya, tomate y trigo, junto con la disminución en los contenidos de glucosa.

De esta manera, el metabolismo de azúcares solubles y almidón puede afectar la fotosíntesis. Sin embargo, el papel que desempeñan los carbohidratos en los mecanismos que controlan la aclimatación a elevadas concentraciones de CO2 todavía no está completamente claro. Moore et al. (1999) propusieron que altas tasas de asimilación de CO2 llevan a una elevada síntesis de sacarosa, a su vez, correlacionada con una alta tasa de producción de hexosas, la cual, para integrarse al pool de hexosas fosfato, necesitan ser fosforiladas mediante la hexoquinase (HXQ), ya que esta proteína actuaría como un sensor del fl ujo de hexosas. En periodos de bajo flujo de fosforilación, la HXQ por medio de proteínas efectoras activaría genes que codifiquen la síntesis de proteínas que promuevan la fotosíntesis. En periodos de alto flujo de fosforilación, la HXQ inhibiría estos genes.

Sharkey & Schrader (2006) propusieron que en condiciones de elevadas concentraciones de CO2, el sugar sensing nocturno sería determinante, ya que las plantas pueden percibir y modificar la relación almidón/sacarosa, lo que puede afectar la razón fuente/vertedero y, por consiguiente, su crecimiento.

Los mecanismos que regulan la relación entre hoja y crecimiento todavía no son suficientemente comprendidos, tal vez porque los estudios son hechos a diferentes escalas de tiempo (Poorter & Navas 2003; Walter et al. 2005), y pocos son los estudios de variaciones de respuesta a corto plazo. Se sabe que los procesos metabólicos están gobernados por ciclos diarios o ritmos circadianos (Walter et al. 2002), con lo cual se concibe que es posible que el efecto de las altas concentraciones de CO2 se refleje en la amplitud y en las fases del ciclo de crecimiento diario

CONSIDERACIONES FINALES

El CO2 y la alta temperatura son variables que están produciendo el cambio climático, a la vez que son parámetros importantes que afectan el crecimiento y la fisiología en muchas especies de plantas. Como consecuencia de ellas, también se está alterando la estructura y la distribución agrícola y de los ecosistemas naturales, lo cual, en estos últimos, modifica su función de vertederos de carbono. Las altas concentraciones de CO2 afectan directamente y, en general positivamente, el metabolismo del carbono. El aumento de temperatura puede tener diferentes efectos en la fisiología de la planta. Sin embargo, se esperan importantes interacciones de estos eventos asociados con cambios hidrológicos. El desarrollo de estas líneas de investigación ha permitido redimensionar la influencia de las actividades antropogénicas en el desequilibrio de estos sistemas. ¿Qué ocurrirá a mediano y largo plazo? La investigación en ciencia básica ha permitido tener un conocimiento cada vez más ajustado a la realidad y, con él, mediante la interdisciplinariedad, esperamos contar con una perspectiva más integradora sobre estos eventos, desde la universidad y centros de investigación, para lo cual se debe contar con la inversión de gobiernos y entidades privadas.

AGRADECIMIENTOS

Los autores agradecen el apoyo de la Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa FAPESP, del Estado de Sao Paulo, proceso 06/61544-4, así como del Ministerio da Ciência e Tecnología, y de la empresa de energía Electronorte, de Brasil.

REFERENCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS

Aidar, M. P., C. A. Martínez, C. A. Costa, P. M. F. Costa, S. M. C. Dietrich & M. S. Buckeridge. 2002. Effect of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on the establishment of seedlings of jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L. -Leguminosae-Caesalpinioideae). Biota Neotropica 2 (1). Version en línea: [http://www.biotaneotropica.org.br]. Fecha de consulta: 06 de febrero del 2009.

Al-Khatib, K. & G. M. Paulsen. 1999. High-temperature effects on photosynthetic processes in temperate and tropical cereals. Crop Science 39: 119-125.

Albert,K. R., T. N. Mikkelsen, A. Michelsen, H. Ro-Poulsen & L. van der Linden. 2011 Interactive effects of drought, elevated CO2 and warming on photosynthetic capacity and photosystem performance in temperate heath plants. Journal of Plant Physiology 168: 1550-1561.

Ainsworth, E. A., P. A. Davey, C. J. Bernacchi, O. C. Dermody, E. A. Heaton, P. B. Morgan, S. l. Naidu, H-S. Yoo ra, X-G. Zhu, P.S. Curtis & S.P. Long. 2002. A meta analysis of elevated [CO2] effects on soybean (Glycine max) physiology, growth and yield. Global Change Biology 8: 695-709.

Ainsworth, E. A. & S. P. Long. 2005. What have we learned from 15 years of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE)? A meta-analytic review of the responses of photosynthesis, canopy properties and plant production to rising CO2. New Phytologist 165: 351-372

Barton, C. V. M., H. S. J. Lee & P. G. Jarvis. 1993. A branch bag and CO2 control system for long-term CO2 enrichment of mature Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.). Plant, Cell and Environment 16: 1139-1148.

Berry, J. & O. Björkman. 1980. Photosynthetic response and adaptation to temperature in higher plants. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 31: 491-543.

Buchanan, B.B., W. E Gruíssem & R. Jones. 1998. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants. ASPP. 650 p.

Buckeridge, M. S. & S. M. C. Dietrich. 1996. Mobilisation of the raffinose family oligosaccharides and galactomannan in germinating seeds of Sesbania marginata Benth. Plant Science 117: 33-43.

Buckeridge, M. S., H. P. Santos & M. A. S. Tiné. 2000a. Mobilisation of storage cell wall polysaccharides in seeds. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 38: 141-156.

Buckeridge, M. S., M. A. S. Tiné, H. P. Santos & D. U. Lima. 2000b. Polissacarídeos de reserva de parede celular em sementes. Revista Brasileira de FisiologiaVegetal 12: 137-162.

Buckeridge, M. S., S. M. C. Dietrich & D. U. Lima. 2000c. Galactomannans as the reserve carbohydrate in legume seeds, pp.: 283-316. En: Gupta, A.K. & N. Kaur (eds.). Carbohydrate reserves in plants: synthesis and regulation. Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Buckeridge, M. S., H. P. Santos, M. A. Tiné & M. P. M. Aidar. 2004. Mobilização de Reservas, pp.:163-185. En: Gui Ferreira & Fabian Borgheti (eds.). Germinação. Do básico ao aplicado. Alfredo Artmed. Porto Alegre.

Buckeridge, M. S., L. Mortari & M. Machado. 2007. Respostas fisiológicas de plantas às mudanças climáticas: alterações no balanço de carbono nas plantas podem afetar o ecossistema?, pp.: 1-13. En: Gizelda, M. R., R.R.B. Negrelle & L. P. C. Morellato. Fenologia: ferramenta para conservação, melhoramento e manejo de recursos vegetais arbóreos. Colombo.

Buckeridge, M. S. 2008. Seqüestro de carbono, cana-de-açúcar e o efeito Cinderela. Versión en linea: [http://www.comciencia.br/comciencia/?section=8&edicao=23&id=258 .] Fecha de consulta: 10 de diciembre del 2009.

Buckeridge, M. S., M. Aidar, C. Martinez & E. Silva. 2008. Respostas das plantas às mudanças climáticas, pp.: 78-91. En: Buckeridge, M. S. Biologia & as mudanças climáticas. Rima Editora. São Pablo.

Budowski, G. 1965. Distribution of tropical american rain forest species in the light of successional processes. Turrialba 15: 40-42

Costa, P.M. 2004. Efeitos da alta concentração de CO2 sobre o crescimento e o estabelecimento de plântulas do jatobá de mata Hymenaea courbaril l. Var. Stilbocarpa (Heyne). Universidad de Campinas. São Paulo. 88 p.

Crafts-Brandner, S. J., F. J. van de Loo & M. E. Salvucci. 1997. The two forms of Ribulose-1,5Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Acti vase differ in sensitivity to elevated temperature. Plant Physiology 114: 439-444.

Crafts-Brandner, S. J. & M. E. Salvucci. 2000. Rubisco activase constrains the photosynthetic potential of leaves at high temperature and CO2. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 97: 13430-13435.

Drake, B. G., M. A. Gonzalez-Meler & S. P. Long. 1997. More efficient plants: a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2? Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 48: 609-639.

Druart, N., M. Rodríguez-Buey, G. Barron-Gafford, A. Sjödin, R. Bhalerao & V. Hurry. 2006. Molecular targets of elevated [CO2] in leaves and stem of Populus deltoides: implications for future tree growth and carbon sequestration. Functional Plant Biology 33: 121-131.

Farquhar G. D., S. Von Caemmerer & J. A. Berry. 1980. A biochemical model of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in leaves of C3 species. Planta 149: 78-90

Farquhar, G. D. & S. Von Caemmerer. 1982. Modeling of photosynthetic response to environmental conditions, pp.: 549-587 (Vol. 12B). En: Lange, O.L., P.S. Nobel, C.B. Osmond y H. Ziegler (eds.). Physiological Plant Ecology I. Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology New Series. Springer-Verlag. Berlin.

Gaastra, P. 1959. Photosynthesis of crop plantas as influenced by light, carbon dioxide, temperature and stomalatl difussion resistance. Mededelingen Landbou 59: 1-68.

Godoy, J. R. L. 2007. Ecofisiologia do estabelecimento de leguminosas arbóreas da Mata Atlântica, pertencentes a diferentes grupos funcionais, sob atmosfera enriquecida com CO2: uma abordagem sucessional. Informe presentado al Instituto de Botânica. São Paulo. 113 p.

Godoy, O., J. P. de Lemos-Filho & F. Valladares. 2011. Invasive species can handle leaf temperature under water stress than Mediterranean natives. Environmental and Experimental Botany 71: 207-214

Gunderson, C. A., R. J. Norby & S. D. Wullschleger. 2000. Acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration to simulated climatic warming in northern and southern populations of Acer saccharum: laboratory and field experiments. Tree Physiology 20: 87-96.

Haldimann, P. & U. Feller. 2004. Inhibition of photosynthesis by high temperature in oak (Quercus pubescens L.) leaves grown under natural conditions closely correlates with a reversible heat-dependent reduction of the activation state of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Plant, Cell and Environment 27: 1169-1183.

Hall, A. E. 2001. Crop Responses to Environment. CRC Press LLC. Boca Raton. 232 p.

Hikosaka, K., K. Ishikawa, A. Borjigidai, O. Muller & Y. Onoda. 2006. Temperature acclimation of photosynthesis: mechanisms involved in the changes in temperature dependence of photosynthetic rate. Journal of Experimental Botany 57: 291-302.

Houghton, J. T., G. J. Jenkins & J. J. Ephraums (eds.). 1990. Climate Change: The IPCC scientific assesment. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge-New York-Melbourne. 410 p

Houghton, J. T., L. G. Meira Filho, B. A. Callander, N. Harris, A. Kattenberg & K. Maskell (eds.). 1995. Climate Change 1995. The science of Climate Change. The IPCC scientific assesment. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge-New York-Melbourne. 588 p

Houghton, J. T., Y. Ding, D. J. Griggs, M. Noguer, P. J. Van der Linden, X. Dai, K. Maskell, & C. A. Johnson (eds.). 2001. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge-New York. 881 p.

Kinsman, E. A., C. Lewis, M.S. Davies, J.E. Young, D. Francis, B. Vilhar & H.J. Ougham. 1997. Elevated CO2 stimulates cells to divide in grass meristems: a differential effect in two natural populations of Dactylis glomerata. Plant, Cell and Environment 20: 1309-1316.

Körner, C., R. Asshoff, O. Bignucolo, S. Hättenschwiler, S. G. Keel, S. Peláez-Riedl, S. Pepin, R. T. W. Siegwolf & G. Zotz. 2005. Carbon Flux and Growth in Mature Deciduous Forest Trees Exposed to Elevated CO2. Science 309:1360-1362

Kruse, J., I. Hetzger, C. Mai, A. Polle & H. Rennenberg. 2003. Elevated CO2 affects N metabolism of young poplar plants (Populus tremolo XP. alba) differently at defi cient and sufficient N-supply. New Phytologist 157: 65-81.

Lake, J. A., W. P. Quick, D. J. Beerling & F. I. Woodward. 2001. Signals from mature to new leaves. Nature 411: 154-155.

Lake, J. A., F. I. Woodward & W. P. Quick. 2002. Long distance CO2 signaling in plants. Journal of Experimental Botany 53: 183-193.

Lambers, H., S. Chapin & T. Pons. 2008. Plant physiological ecology. Springer. New York. 604 p.

Law, R. & S. J. Crafts-Brandner. 1999 . Inhibition and acclimation of photosynthesis to heat stress is closely correlated with activation of ribulose1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Plant Physiology 120: 173-182.

Lea, P. J. & R. C. Leegood. 1999. Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Chichester. Wiley. 364 p.

Leakey, A. D. B., E. A. Ainsworth, C. J. Bernacchi, A. Rogers, S. Long & D. R. Ort. 2009. Elevated CO2 effects on plant carbon, nitrogen, and water relations: six important lessons from FACE. Journal of Experimental Botany 60: 2859-2876.

Levitt, J. 1980. Responses of plants to environmental stresses. 2nd. edition. V 1: chilling, freezing and high temperature stresses. V 2: water stress, dehydration and drought injury. Academic Press. 607 p.

Long, S. P., E. A. Ainsworth, A. Rogers & D. R. Ort. 2004. Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide: plants FACE the future. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 55: 591-628.

Long, S. P., E. A. Ainsworth, C. J. Bernacchi, P. A. Davey, P. B. Morgan, G. Y. Hymus, A. D. B. Leakey & C. P. Osborne. 2006. Long-term responses of photosynthesis and stomata to elevated [CO2] in managed systems, pp.: 253-270. En: Nösberger J., S.P., Long, R.J. Norby, M. Stitt, G.R. Hendrey, H. Blum (eds.). Managed Ecosystems and CO2. Case Studies, Processes and Perspectives. Springer-Verlag. Heidelberg. 455 p.

Loreto, F., C. Barta, F. Brilli & I. Nogues. 2006. On the induction of volatile organic compound emissions by plants as consequence of wounding or fluctuations of light and temperature. Plant, cell and environment 29: 1820-1828.

Loreto, F. & M. Centritto. 2008. Leaf carbon assimilation in a water-limited world. Plant Biosystems 142: 154-161.

Lovelock, C. E., K. Winter, R. Mersits & M. Popp. 1998. Responses of communities of tropical tree species to elevated CO2 in a forest clearing. Oecologia 116: 207-218.

Marabesi, M. 2007. Efeito do alto CO2 no crescimento inicial e nafisiologia da fotossíntese em plântulas Senna alata (L.) Roxb. Instituto de Botânica. São Paulo. 78 p.

Machado, M. 2007. Estudo bioquímico e da estrutura foliar de plântulas do jatobá da mata (Hymenaea courbaril L.) e do cerrado (Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart.) expostas à concentração elevada de CO2. Universidad de Campinas. São Paulo 102 p.

Metz, B., O. R. Davidson, H. de Coninck, M. Loos & L. Me (eds.). 2005. La captación y el almacenamiento de dióxido de carbono. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 57 p.

Metz, B., O. R. Davidson, P. R. Bosch, R. Dave & L. A. Meyer (eds.). 2007. Contributi on of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Chang. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 841 p.

Miglieta, F., A. Peressotti, F. P. Vaccari, A. Zaldei, P. Deangelis & G. Scarascia- Mugnozza. 2001. Free air carbon dioxide enrichment of a poplar plantation: description and performance of the POPFACE system. New Phytologist 150: 465-476.

Moore, B.D., S.-H. Cheng, D.E Sims, & J. R. Seemann. 1999. The biochemical and molecular basis for photosynthetic acclimation to elevated atmospheric CO2. Plant Cell and Environment 22: 567-589.

Olivo, N., C. A. Martínez & M. A. Oliva. 2002. The photosynthetic response to elevated CO2 in high altitude potato species (Solanum curtilobum). Photosynthetica, Praha 40: 309-313.

ONU. 1998. Protocolo de Kyoto de la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el cambio climático. Naciones Unidas. 25 p.

Parry, M.L., O.F. Canziani, J.P. Paluti kof, P.J. van der Linden & C.E. Hanson (eds.). 2007. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. 976 p.

Philips, O. L., Y. Malhi, N. Higuchi, W. F. Laurance, R. M. Núñez, D. J. D. Váxquez, L. V. Laurance, S. G. Ferreira, M. Stern, S. Brown & J. Grace. 1998. Changes in the carbon balance of tropical forests: evidence from long-term plots. Science 282: 439-442.

Poorter, H., Y. Berkel, R. Baxter, J. Hertog, P. Dijkstra, R. M. Gifford, K. L. Griffi n, C. Roumet, J. R. & S. C. Wong. 1997. The effect of elevated CO2 on the chemical composition and construction costs of leaves of 27 C-3 species. Plant Cell and Environment 20: 472-482.

Poorter, H, & M. L. Navas. 2003. Plant growth and competition at elevated CO2: on winners, losers and functional groups. New Phytologist 157: 175-198.

Prentice, I.C. 2001. The Carbon Cycle and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, pp.: 135-237. En: Houghton, J.T.,Y. Ding, D.J. Griggs, M. Noguer, P.J. van der Linden, X. Dai, K. Maskell & C.A. Johnson (eds.). Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York.

Ranasinghe, C. & G. Taylor. 1996. Mechanism for increased leaf growth in elevated CO2. Journal of Experimental Botany 47: 349-358.

Rennenberg, F., A. Loreto, F. Polle, S. Brilli, R. S. Fares Beniwal & Gessler A. 2006. Physiological responses of forest trees to heat and drought. Plant Biology 8: 556-571

Sage, R. F. 1990. A model describing the regulation of ribulose-1,5- bisphosphate carboxylase, electron transport, and triose phosphatesse in response to light-intensity and CO2 in C3 plants. Plant Physiology 94: 1728-1734.

Sage, R & D. Kubien. 2007. The temperature response of C3 and C4 photosynthesis. Plant, Cell and Environment 30: 1086-1106.

Salisbury, F. & F. Ross. 2000. Fisiología de las Plantas. Thompson Editores Spain Paraninfo, S. A. España. 947 p.

Salvucci, M. E. & S. J. Crafts-Brandner. 2004. Mechanisms for deactivation of Rubisco under moderate heat stress. Physiologia Plantarum 122: 513-519.

Sampaio, G., J. Marengo & C. Nobre. 2008. A atmosfera e as Mudanças Climáticas, pp.: 5-28. En: Buckeridge, M.S. (ed.). Biologia & Mudanças Climáticas no Brasil. Rima Editora. São Carlos.

Sawada S., M. Kuninaka, K. Watanabe, A. Sato, H. Kawamura, K. Komine, T. Sakamoto & M. Kasai. 2001. The mechanism to suppress photosynthesis through end-product inhibition in single-rooted soybean leaves during acclimation to CO2 enrichment. Plant and Cell Physiology 42: 1093-1102.

Sharkey, T. D. 1985. Photosynthesis in intact leaves of C3 plants -physics, physiology and rate limitations. Botanical Review 51: 53-105.

Sharkey, T. D., M. Laporte, Y. Lu, S. Weise & APM. Weber. 2004. Engineering plants for elevated CO2: a relationship between starch degradation and sugar sensing. Plant Biology 6: 280-288.

Sharkey, T.D. & S. M. Schrader. 2006. High temperature stress, pp.: 101-129. En: Rao K.V.M., A.S. Raghavendra & K.J. Reddy (eds). Physiology and Molecular Biology of Stress Tolerance in Plants. Springer, Netherlands.

Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor & H.L. Miller (eds.). 2007. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 996 p.

Taiz, L. & E. Zeiger. 2009. Fisiología Vegetal. 3a ed. Artmed. Porto alegre. 581 p.

Turnbull, M. H., R. Murthy & K. L. Griffin. 2002. The relative impacts of daytime and nighttime warming on photosynthetic capacity in Populus deltoides. Plant Cell and Environment 25: 1729-1737.

Von Caemmerer, S. 2000. Biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis. CSIRO, Collingwood. 167p.

Walter, A, R. Feil & U. Schurr. 2002. Restriction of nyctinastic movements and application of tensile forces to leaves affects diurnal patterns of expansion growth. Functional Plant Biology 29: 1247-1258.

Walter, A., M. Christ, G. Barron-Gafford, A. Grieve, R. Murthy & U. Rascher. 2005. The effect of elevated CO2 on diel leaf growth cycle, leaf carbohydrate content and canopy growth performance of Populus deltoides. Global Change Biology 11: 1207-1219.

Watson, R.T., D. L. Albritton, T. Barker, I. A. Bashmakov, O. Canziani, R. Christ, U. Cubasch, O. Davidson, H. Gitay, D. Griggs, K. Halsnaes, J. Houghton, J. House, Z. Kundzewicz, M. Lal, N. Leary, C. Magadza, J. J. McCarthy, J. F. B. Mitchell, J. R. Moreira, M. Munasinghe, I. Noble, R. Pachauri, B. Pittock, M. Prather, R. G. Richels, J. B. Robinson, J. Sathaye, S. Schneider, R. Scholes, T. Stocker, N. Sundararaman, R. T. Taniguchi & D. Zhou. (eds.). 2001. Climate Change 2001: Synthesis Report. A contribution of Working Groups I, II, and III to the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. United Kingdom-New York. 398 p.

Wu, Y. & D. J. Cosgrove. 2000. Adaptation of roots to low water potentials by changes in cell wall extensibility and cell wall proteins. Journal of Experimental Botany 51: 1543-1553.

Würth, M., K. Winter, & C. H. Körner. 1998. Leaf carbohydrate responses to CO2 enrichment at the top of a tropical forest. Oecología 116: 18-25

Yepes, A. 2010. Desenvolvimento e efeito da concentração atmosférica de CO2 e da temperatura em plantas juvenis de Hymenaea courbaril L. Universidad de São Paulo. Jatobá. 180 p.

Yordanov, I., S. Dilova, R. Petkova, T. Pangelova, V. Goltsev & K. H. Suess. 1986. Mechanisms of the temperature damage and acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus. Photobiochemistry and Photobiophysics 12: 147-155.

Loading...