DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3768

Published:

2011-07-01

Issue:

Vol 13, No 2 (2011) July-December

Section:

Reflections on Praxis

An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language

Un currículo interdisciplinario de base teórica para enseñar inglés como segunda lengua1

Authors

  • Brenda Fuentes Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas
  • Francisco Soto Mas University of Texas at El Paso
  • Erika Mein University of Texas at El Paso
  • Holly E. Jacobson University of New Mexico

Keywords:

Second language learning, bilingualism, immigrants, literacy, ESL, health literacy (en).

Keywords:

Aprendizaje de segunda lengua, bilingüismo, inmigrantes, ESL, literacidad, salud (es).

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Abstract (en)

Among Hispanic immigrants in the United States (US), learning English is considered necessary for economic and social achievement. As a consequence, there is a high demand for English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Despite the recognized benefits of ESL programs, both at the individual and social levels, more research is needed to identify education strategies that effectively promote all aspects of learning English as a second language. This article describes an ESL curriculum that incorporates a theory-based pedagogical approach specifically designed for immigrant Hispanic adults on the US-Mexico border region. The article also describes the implementation of the curriculum as well as the results of the evaluation, which was conducted using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative results indicate that the participants significantly improved their English proficiency (L2). Qualitative results suggest that participants were positively impacted by both the content and pedagogical approaches used by the curriculum. Their experience with the ESL class was positive in general. It can be concluded that the curriculum achieved its objective. This approach could serve as a model for second language teaching for adults.

Abstract (es)

Para los inmigrantes hispanos de los Estados Unidos (EEUU) aprender inglés (L2) es considerado necesario para progresar y funcionar en la sociedad, y hay una gran demanda de clases de inglés como segunda lengua o English as a Second Language (ESL). A pesar del reconocido beneficio individual y social de los programas de ESL, todavía se debe potenciar la investigación de estrategias educativas eficaces en los diferentes aspectos del aprendizaje del inglés como segunda lengua. Este artículo describe una estrategia pedagógica de base teórica incorporada en un currículo de ESL para hispanos inmigrantes adultos en la frontera entre EEUU y México. Igualmente el presente artículo describe la implementación y evaluación del currículo mediante métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos. Los resultados cuantitativos indican que los participantes mejoraron significativamente su nivel de L2. Además, los resultados cualitativos sugieren que los participantes recibieron satisfactoriamente tanto el contenido como la metodología pedagógica del currículo, y en general declararon haber tenido una experiencia positiva con la clase. Este trabajo podría servir de modelo para la enseñanza de una segunda lengua para adultos.

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How to Cite

APA

Fuentes, B., Soto Mas, F., Mein, E., & Jacobson, H. E. (2011). An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 13(2), 60–73. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3768

ACM

[1]
Fuentes, B., Soto Mas, F., Mein, E. and Jacobson, H.E. 2011. An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal. 13, 2 (Jul. 2011), 60–73. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3768.

ACS

(1)
Fuentes, B.; Soto Mas, F.; Mein, E.; Jacobson, H. E. An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language. Colomb. appl. linguist. j 2011, 13, 60-73.

ABNT

FUENTES, B.; SOTO MAS, F.; MEIN, E.; JACOBSON, H. E. An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, [S. l.], v. 13, n. 2, p. 60–73, 2011. DOI: 10.14483/22487085.3768. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/3768. Acesso em: 18 oct. 2021.

Chicago

Fuentes, Brenda, Francisco Soto Mas, Erika Mein, and Holly E. Jacobson. 2011. “An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 13 (2):60-73. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3768.

Harvard

Fuentes, B., Soto Mas, F., Mein, E. and Jacobson, H. E. (2011) “An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language”, Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 13(2), pp. 60–73. doi: 10.14483/22487085.3768.

IEEE

[1]
B. Fuentes, F. Soto Mas, E. Mein, and H. E. Jacobson, “An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language”, Colomb. appl. linguist. j, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 60–73, Jul. 2011.

MLA

Fuentes, B., F. Soto Mas, E. Mein, and H. E. Jacobson. “An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, vol. 13, no. 2, July 2011, pp. 60-73, doi:10.14483/22487085.3768.

Turabian

Fuentes, Brenda, Francisco Soto Mas, Erika Mein, and Holly E. Jacobson. “An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 13, no. 2 (July 1, 2011): 60–73. Accessed October 18, 2021. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/3768.

Vancouver

1.
Fuentes B, Soto Mas F, Mein E, Jacobson HE. An interdisciplinary theory-based ESL curriculum to teach English as a second language. Colomb. appl. linguist. j [Internet]. 2011Jul.1 [cited 2021Oct.18];13(2):60-73. Available from: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/3768

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