DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/2256201X.18232

Publicado:

2022-07-01

Número:

Vol. 25 Núm. 2 (2022): Julio-diciembre

Sección:

Artículos de investigación científica y tecnológica

Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano

Influence of Soil Nutrients on Tree Growth in Colombian Pacific Forests

Autores/as

Palabras clave:

Tropical forests, Soil fertility, Fabaceae, Organic matter, Nitrogen (en).

Palabras clave:

Bosques tropicales, Fertilidad del suelo, Fabaceae, Materia orgánica, Nitrógeno (es).

Referencias

Angelsen, A., Brockhaus, M., Kanninen, M., Sills, E., Sunderlin, W., & Wertz-Kanounnikoff, S. (2009). Realising REDD+: National strategy and policy options. CIFOR. http://www.cifor.org/publications/pdf_files/books/bangelsen1201-references.pdf

Alder, D., Oavika, F., Sánchez, M., Silva, J., Hout, P., & Wright, H. (2002). A comparison of species growth rates from four moist tropical forest regions using increment-size ordination. International Forestry Review, 4(3), 196-205. https://doi.org/10.1505/IFOR.4.3.196.17398 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1505/IFOR.4.3.196.17398

Ashton, P., & Hall, P. (1992). Comparisons of structure among mixed dipterocarp forests of north-western Borneo. Journal of Ecology, 80(3), 459-481. https://doi.org/10.2307/2260691 DOI: https://doi.org/10.2307/2260691

Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APG IV) (2016). An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG IV. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 181(1), 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1111/boj.12385 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/boj.12385

Austin, A., & Vitousek, P. (1998). Nutrient dynamics on a precipitation gradient in Hawaii. Oecologia 113, 519-529. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050405 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050405

Baker, T., Phillips, O., Malhi, Y., Almeida, S., Arroyo, L., di Fiore, A., Erwin, T., Killeen, T., Laurance, S., Laurance, W., Lewis, S., Lloyd, J., Monteagudo, A., Neill, D., Patiño, S., Pitman, N., Silva, J., & Vásquez-Martínez. R. (2004). Variation in wood density determines spatial patterns in Amazonian forest biomass. Global Change Biology, 10(5), 545-562. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2004.00751.x DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2004.00751.x

Baker, T., Swaine, M., & Burslem, D. (2003). Variation in tropical forest growth rates: combined effects of functional group composition and resource availability. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 6(1), 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1078/1433-8319-00040 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1078/1433-8319-00040

Baribault, T., Kobe, R., & Finley, A. (2012). Tropical tree growth is correlated with soil phosphorus, potassium, and calcium, though not for legumes. Ecological Monographs, 82(2), 189-203. https://www.jstor.org/stable/41739364 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/11-1013.1

Brown, S. (1997). Estimating biomass and biomass change of tropical forests: A primer. Food and Agriculture Organization. http://www.fao.org/3/w4095e/w4095e00.htm

Büntgen, U., Krusic, P. J., Piermattei, A. Coomes, D., Esper, J., Myglan, V., Kirdyanov, A., Camarero, J., Crivellaro, A., & Körner, C. (2019). Limited capacity of tree growth to mitigate the global greenhouse effect under predicted warming. Nature Communications, 10, 2171. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10174-4 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10174-4

Chambers, J., Higuchi, N., & Schimel, J. (1998). Ancient trees inAmazonia. Nature, 391, 135-136. https://doi.org/10.1038/34325 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/34325

Chapin III, F. (1980). The mineral nutrition of wild plants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 11, 233-260 https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.es.11.110180.001313 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.es.11.110180.001313

Clark, D., Clark, D., & Read, J. (1998). Edaphic variation and the mesoscale distribution of tree species in a Neotropical rain forest. Journal of Ecology, 86(1), 101-112. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2745.1998.00238.x DOI: https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2745.1998.00238.x

Clark, D., Hurtado, J., & Saatchi, S. (2015). Tropical rain forest structure, tree growth and dynamics along a 2700-m elevational transect in Costa Rica. PLoS ONE, 10(4), e0122905. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122905 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122905

Clark, D. (2002). Are tropical forests an important carbon sink? Reanalysis of the long-term plot data. Ecological Applications, 12(1), 3-7. https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2002)012[0003:ATFAIC]2.0.CO;2 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2002)012[0003:ATFAIC]2.0.CO;2

Clark, D., Brown, S., Kicklighter, D., Chambers, J., Thomlinson, J., Holland, E., & Ni, J. (2001). Net primary production in forest: an evaluation and sinthesis of existing field data. Ecological Aplications, 11(2), 356- 370. https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2001)011[0371:NPPITF]2.0.CO;2 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2001)011[0356:MNPPIF]2.0.CO;2

Dalling, J., Heineman, K., López, O., Wright, J., & Turner, B. (2016). Nutrient availability in tropical rain forests: The paradigm of phosphorus limitation. En G. Goldstein & L. S. Santiago (Eds.), Tropical tree physiology. Adaptations and responses in a changing environment (pp. 261-273). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27422-5_12 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27422-5_12

Davidson, E. A., & Howarth, R. W. (2007). Environmental science: Nutrients in synergy. Nature, 449, 1000-1001. https://doi.org/10.1038/4491000a DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/4491000a

Dixon, R., Brown, S., Houghton, R., Solomon, A., Trexler, M., & Wisniewski, J. (1994). Carbon pools and flux of global forest ecosystems. Science, 263(5144), 185-190. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/263/5144/185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.263.5144.185

Field, C., Behrenfeld, M., Randerson, J., & Falkowski, P. (1998). Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components. Science, 281(5374), 237-240. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.281.5374.237 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.281.5374.237

García, F., Ramos, Y., Palacios, J., Arroyo, J., Mena, A., & González, M. (2003). SALERO Diversidad biológica de un bosque pluvial tropical (bp-T). Editorial Guadalupe Ltda.

Gentry, A. (1993). A field guide to the families and genera of woody plants of Northwest South Amercian. Conservation International.

Houghton, R. (2005). Aboveground forest biomass and the global carbon balance. Global Change Biology, 11(6), 945-958. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2005.00955.x DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2005.00955.x

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC (2014). Climate Change 2014: Synthesis report. Contribution of working groups I, II and III to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. IPCC. https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/

Instituto de Investigaciones Ambientales del Pacífico (IIAP) (2015). Plan integral de cambio climático del departamento del Chocó (PICC-Chocó). Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible, IIAP.

Iversen, C., & Norby, R. (2008). Nitrogen limitation in a sweetgum plantation: Implications for carbon allocation and storage. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 38(5), 1021-1032. https://doi.org/10.1139/X07-213 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1139/X07-213

Lambers, H., Chapin III., F., & Pons, T. (2008). Plant physiological ecology (2da ed.). Springer Science Business Media. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-78341-3

LeBauer, D., & Treseder, K. (2008). Nitrogen limitation of net primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems is globally distributed. Ecology, 89(2), 371-379. https://doi.org/10.1890/06-2057.1 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/06-2057.1

Melo, O., & Vargas, R. (2003). Evaluación ecológica y silvicultural de ecosistemas boscosos. Universidad del Tolima, Impresiones CONDE.

Myers, N., Mittermeier, R., Mittermeier, C., Da Fonseca, G., & Kent, J. (2000). Biodiversity hotspots for conservation priorities. Nature, 403, 853-858. https://doi.org/10.1038/35002501 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/35002501

Oelmann, Y., Potvin, C., Mark, T., Werther, L., Tapernon, S., & Wilcke. W. (2010). Tree mixture effects on aboveground nutrient pools of trees in an experimental plantation in Panama. Plant and Soil, 326(1), 199-212. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-009-9997-x DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-009-9997-x

Paoli, G., & Curran, L. (2007). Soil nutrients limit fine litter production and tree growth in mature lowland forest of southwestern Borneo. Ecosystems, 10, 503-518 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-007-9042-y DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-007-9042-y

Posada, J., & Schuur, E. (2011). Relationships among precipitation regime, nutrient availability, and carbon turnover in tropical rain forests. Oecologia, 165,783-795. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-010-1881-0 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-010-1881-0

Poveda, G., & Mesa O. (2000). On the existence of Lloró (the rainiest locality on Earth): enhanced ocean-land-atmosphere interaction by a low level jet. Geophysical Research Letters, 27(11), 1675-1678. https://doi.org/10.1029/1999GL006091 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/1999GL006091

Poveda, I., Rojas, C., Rudas, A., & Rangel, O. (2004). El Chocó biogeográfico: ambiente físico. En O. Rangel (Ed.). 2004. Colombia diversidad biótica IV. El Chocó biogeográfico/costa pacífica. Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Quesada, R., Acosta, L., Garro, M., & Castillo, M. (2012). Dinámica del crecimiento del bosque húmedo tropical, 19 años después de la cosecha bajo cuatro sistemas de aprovechamiento forestal en la Península de Osa, Costa Rica. Revista Tecnología en Marcha, 25(5), 56-66. https://doi.org/10.18845/tm.v25i5.474 DOI: https://doi.org/10.18845/tm.v25i5.474

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. (2011). Dinámica de la biomasa aérea en un bosque pluvial tropical del Chocó Biogeográfico. Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, 64(1), 5917-5936. https://repositorio.unal.edu.co/handle/unal/38557

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. (2014). Diversidad florística arbórea y su relación con el suelo en un bosque pluvial tropical del Chocó biogeográfico. Revista Árvore, 38(6), 1123-1132. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0100-67622014000600017 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1590/S0100-67622014000600017

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. (2016). Precipitation effects on soil characteristics in tropical rain forests of the Chocó biogeographical region. Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, 69(1), 7813-7823. http://dx.doi.org/10.15446/rfna.v69n1.54749 DOI: https://doi.org/10.15446/rfna.v69n1.54749

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno, F. (2017a). Net primary productivity and edaphic fertility in two pluvial tropical forests in the Chocó biogeographical region of Colombia. PLoS ONE, 12(1), e0168211. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0168211 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0168211

Quinto-Mosquera, H., Rivas-Urrutia, Y., & Moreno-Hurtado F. (2017b). Efectos de la fertilización del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques pluviales tropicales del Chocó, Colombia. Revista de Biología Tropical, 65(3), 1161-1173. http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v65i3.29442 DOI: https://doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v65i3.29442

Quinto-Mosquera, H., Hurtado, D., & Arboleda, J. (2019). Influencia de las condiciones edaficas sobre la dominancia y diversidad de arboles en bosques pluviales tropicales del Chocó biogeografico. Revista de Biología Tropical, 67(6), 1278-1291. http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v67i6.37517 DOI: https://doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v67i6.37517

R Development Core Team. (2012). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing. http://www.R-project.org/

Restrepo, H., Orrego, S., Salazar-Uribe, J., Bullock, B., & Montes, C. (2019). using biophysical variables and stand density to estimate growth and yield of Pinus patula in Antioquia, Colombia. Open Journal of Forestry, 9, 195-213. https://doi.org/10.4236/ojf.2019.93010 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4236/ojf.2019.93010

Reed, S. C., Townsend, A. R., Taylor, P. G., & Cleveland C. C. (2011). Phosphorus cycling in tropical forests growing on highly weathered soils. En E. Bünemann, A. Oberson, & E. Frossard (Eds.) Phosphorus in Action (pp. 339-369). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15271-9_14 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15271-9_14

Rüger, N., Berger, U., Hubbell, S., Vieilledent, G., & Condit R. (2011). Growth strategies of tropical tree species: Disentangling light and size effects. PLoS ONE, 6(9): e25330. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0025330 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0025330

Russo, S., Davies, S., King, D., & Tan, S. (2005). Soil-related performance variation and distributions of tree species in a Bornean rain forest. Journal of Ecology, 93(5), 879-889. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2005.01030.x DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2005.01030.x

Salisbury, F., & Ross, C. (1994). Fisiología vegetal (4ta ed.). Grupo Editorial Iberoamérica S.A. de C.V.

Santiago, L., Schuur, E., & Silvera, K. (2005). Nutrient cycling and plant-soil feedbacks along a precipitation gradient in lowland Panama. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 21(4), 461-470. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467405002464 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467405002464

Sayer, E., Wright, J., Tanner, E., Yavitt, J., Harms, K., Powers, J., Kaspari, M., García, M., & Turner, B. (2012). Variable responses of lowland tropical forest nutrient status to fertilization and litter manipulation. Ecosystems, 15(3), 387-400. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-011-9516-9 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-011-9516-9

Schlesinger, W. (1997). Biogeochemistry: An analysis of global change. Academic Press.

Soong, J., Janssens, I., Grau, O., Margalef, O., Stahl, C., van Langenhove, L., Urbina, I., Chave, J., Dourdain, A., Ferry, B., Freycon, V., Herault, B., Sardans, J., Peñuelas, J., & Verbruggen, E. (2020). Soil properties explain tree growth and mortality, but not biomass, across phosphorus-depleted tropical forests. Scientific Reports, 10, 2302. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-58913-8 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-58913-8

Statistical Graphics Corp. (2002). Statgraphics Plus Centurium XV, versión 19. https://www.statgraphics.com

Sullivan, B., Alvarez-Clare, S., Castle, S., Porder, S., Reed, S., Schreeg, L., Cleveland, C., & Townsend, A. (2014). Assessing nutrient limitation in complex forested ecosystems: alternatives to large-scale fertilization experiments. Ecology, 95(3), 668-681. https://doi.org/10.1890/13-0825.1 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/13-0825.1

Tanner E., Kapos, V., & Franco, W. (1992). Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization effects on Venezuelan montane forest trunk growth and litterfall. Ecology, 73(1), 78-86. https://doi.org/10.2307/1938722 DOI: https://doi.org/10.2307/1938722

Toledo, M., Poorter, L., Peña-Claros, A., Alarcón, M., Balcázar, J., Leaño, C., Licona, J., Llanque, O., Vroomans, V., Zuidema P., & Bongers, F. (2011). Climate is a stronger driver of tree and forest growth rates than soil and disturbance. Journal of Ecology, 99(1), 254-264. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2010.01741.x DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2010.01741.x

Treseder, K., & Vitousek, P. (2001). Effects of soil nutrient availability on investment in acquisition of N and P in Hawaiian rain forests. Ecology, 82(4), 946-954. https://doi.org/10.1890/0012-9658(2001)082[0946:EOSNAO]2.0.CO;2 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/0012-9658(2001)082[0946:EOSNAO]2.0.CO;2

Turner, I. M. (2001). The ecology of trees in the tropicals rain forest. Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511542206 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511542206

Vitousek, P., Porder, S., Houlton, B., & Chadwick, O. (2010). Terrestrial phosphorus limitation: Mechanisms, implications, and nitrogen–phosphorus interactions. Ecological Applications, 20(1), 5-15. https://doi.org/10.1890/08-0127.1 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/08-0127.1

Vitousek, P. (1984). Litterfall, nutrient cycling, and nutrient limitation in tropical forests. Ecology 65(1), 285-298. https://doi.org/10.2307/1939481 DOI: https://doi.org/10.2307/1939481

Whitmore, T. (1998). An introduction to tropical rain forests (2da ed.). Oxford University Press.

Wright, J., Yavitt, J., Wurzburger, N., Turner, B., Tanner, E., Sayer, E., Santiago, L., Kaspari, M., Hedin, L., Harms, K., García, M., & Corre, M. (2011). Potassium, phosphorus, or nitrogen limit root allocation, tree growth, or litter production in a lowland tropical forest. Ecology, 92(8), 1616-1625. https://doi.org/10.1890/10-1558.1 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1890/10-1558.1

Cómo citar

APA

Quinto Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. H. . (2022). Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Colombia forestal, 25(2), 30–44. https://doi.org/10.14483/2256201X.18232

ACM

[1]
Quinto Mosquera, H. y Moreno-Hurtado, F.H. 2022. Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Colombia forestal. 25, 2 (jul. 2022), 30–44. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/2256201X.18232.

ACS

(1)
Quinto Mosquera, H.; Moreno-Hurtado, F. H. . Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Colomb. for. 2022, 25, 30-44.

ABNT

QUINTO MOSQUERA, H.; MORENO-HURTADO, F. H. . Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Colombia forestal, [S. l.], v. 25, n. 2, p. 30–44, 2022. DOI: 10.14483/2256201X.18232. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/18232. Acesso em: 3 dic. 2022.

Chicago

Quinto Mosquera, Harley, y Flavio H. Moreno-Hurtado. 2022. «Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano». Colombia forestal 25 (2):30-44. https://doi.org/10.14483/2256201X.18232.

Harvard

Quinto Mosquera, H. y Moreno-Hurtado, F. H. . (2022) «Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano», Colombia forestal, 25(2), pp. 30–44. doi: 10.14483/2256201X.18232.

IEEE

[1]
H. Quinto Mosquera y F. H. . Moreno-Hurtado, «Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano», Colomb. for., vol. 25, n.º 2, pp. 30–44, jul. 2022.

MLA

Quinto Mosquera, H., y F. H. . Moreno-Hurtado. «Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano». Colombia forestal, vol. 25, n.º 2, julio de 2022, pp. 30-44, doi:10.14483/2256201X.18232.

Turabian

Quinto Mosquera, Harley, y Flavio H. Moreno-Hurtado. «Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano». Colombia forestal 25, no. 2 (julio 1, 2022): 30–44. Accedido diciembre 3, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/18232.

Vancouver

1.
Quinto Mosquera H, Moreno-Hurtado FH. Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Colomb. for. [Internet]. 1 de julio de 2022 [citado 3 de diciembre de 2022];25(2):30-44. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/colfor/article/view/18232

Descargar cita

Visitas

95

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.

Recibido: 3 de julio de 2021; Aceptado: 22 de marzo de 2022

Resumen

El crecimiento arbóreo tiene gran relevancia en la mitigación del cambio climático. Se ha planteado que, en bosques tropicales, el crecimiento está relacionado con la fertilidad edáfica. Dado que el Pacífico colombiano es una región lluviosa y con suelos pobres en nutrientes, se evaluó cómo las condiciones edáficas explican el crecimiento arbóreo. Para ello se determinó el crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo (CDA) a nivel de parcelas, especies y grupos ecológicos, y se relacionó con las variables físicas y químicas del suelo. Se observó que el CDA en árboles con baja densidad de madera se correlacionó de manera positiva con la materia orgánica (MO), nitrógeno y arena, y de manera negativa con fósforo, limo y arcilla. La familia Fabaceae se correlacionó positivamente con pH, MO, nitrógeno, magnesio y arena, y negativamente con la capacidad de intercambio catiónica efectiva (CICE), limo, arcilla y aluminio. Por consiguiente, se corroboró una limitación nutricional múltiple, que resalta que el crecimiento puede ser condicionado por nutrientes abundantes del suelo, no solo por su escasez limitante.

Palabras clave:

bosques tropicales, fertilidad del suelo, Fabaceae, materia orgánica, nitrógeno..

Abstract

Tree growth has great relevance in mitigating climate change. It has been suggested that, in tropical forests, growth is related to edaphic fertility. Given that the Colombian Pacific is a rainy region with nutrient-poor soils, the way in which edaphic conditions explain tree growth was evaluated. To this effect, the tree diameter growth (CDA) was determined at the level of plots, species, and ecological groups, and it was related to the physical and chemical variables of the soil. It was observed that the CDA in trees with low wood density was positively correlated with organic matter (MO), nitrogen, and sand, and it was negatively correlated with with P, silt, and clay. The Fabaceae family was positively correlated with pH, MO, nitrogen, magnesium, and sand, and negatively so with the effective cation exchange capacity (CICE), silt, clay, and aluminum. Consequently, a multiple nutritional limitation was corroborated, which highlights the fact that growth can be conditioned by abundant nutrients in the soil, not only by their limiting scarcity.

Keywords:

tropical forests, soil fertility, Fabaceae, organic matter, nitrogen..

INTRODUCCIÓN

El crecimiento de árboles puede expresarse como un incremento de los individuos en su peso, volumen, longitud, área total u hojas, tallos y raíces a través del tiempo. Dicho aumento depende del genotipo y de las condiciones ambientales bajo las que se encuentra la planta y es producto de la interacción entre procesos como la fotosíntesis, la respiración, la transpiración y la nutrición mineral (Lambers et al., 2008). La evaluación del crecimiento arbóreo tiene gran relevancia para determinar las respuestas de los árboles frente a factores bióticos y abióticos, estimar la edad, cuantificar la productividad primaria neta y calcular el papel de los bosques en la mitigación del cambio climático global (Clark et al., 2001; Baribault et al., 2012; Quesada et al., 2012; Büntgen et al., 2019; Rüger et al., 2011); y, por otra parte, es necesario para procesos relacionados con proyectos de reducción de las emisiones de la deforestación y la degradación de bosques (REDD), licencias ambientales y planes de manejo forestal, entre otros (Angelsen et al., 2009). En consecuencia, es fundamental evaluar el crecimiento diamétrico de los árboles, con el fin de develar cuánto carbono atmosférico están almacenando anualmente (Clark, 2002; IPCC, 2014; Houghton, 2005). Esto, especialmente en bosques tropicales, dado que son ecosistemas que capturan anualmente cerca del 36 % del carbono atmosférico total del planeta (Dixon et al., 1994; Field et al., 1998; Clark et al., 2015).

En bosques tropicales, aunque la mayoría de los árboles crecen muy lentamente (promedio 1.0 mm.año-1) (Turner, 2001; Baribault et al., 2012), presentan un rango amplio de variación: entre 0.5 y 6.0 mm.año-1 en diámetro, con una tasa máxima cercana a 15 mm.año-1 (Turner, 2001). En tal sentido, se ha planteado que el crecimiento de los árboles es una función de cuatro factores: 1) la edad del bosque, 2) la calidad del sitio o las condiciones ambientales, 3) las características intrínsecas como la genética, y 4) la densidad de individuos y las prácticas de manejo del bosque, incluyendo la fertilización, el manejo de plagas y el control de competencia por vegetación (Restrepo et al., 2019). Esto explica por qué en bosques tropicales primarios y secundarios se presenta un amplio rango de variación en el crecimiento.

Uno de los factores ambientales que más influye sobre las tasas de crecimiento de los árboles tropicales son las condiciones edáficas, en especial el contenido de nutrientes del suelo (Baker et al., 2003; Baribault et al., 2012). Aunque muchos árboles de bosques lluviosos tropicales crecen sobre suelos relativamente pobres en nutrientes (Whitmore, 1998; Turner, 2001; Dalling et al., 2016), la disponibilidad de estos a menudo determina gran parte de la variación espacial del crecimiento arbóreo (Baker et al., 2003). En este sentido, se ha propuesto la hipótesis de que la productividad y el crecimiento de los árboles en bosques tropicales de baja altitud se encuentran limitados por la disponibilidad de P edáfico (Tanner et al., 1992). Así lo han evidenciado diferentes estudios como el desarrollado recientemente por Soong et al. (2020), quienes reportan una correlación entre el crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo (CDA) y el contenido de P total del suelo en bosques lluviosos de Guayana Francesa. Sin embargo, las investigaciones en las que se evalua la relación entre el CDA en bosques tropicales y los nutrientes del suelo aún presentan controversias, y en pocas se prueban las hipótesis mencionadas.

Por ejemplo, Ashton y Hall (1992) y Clark et al. (1998) no encontraron correlación entre el CDA y los nutrientes del suelo en bosques lluviosos de Borneo y Costa Rica, mientras que Baribault et al. (2012) afirmaron que el CDA se correlaciona positivamente con los nutrientes del suelo como Ca, K, Mg y P, pero rara vez con el nitrógeno (N). Asimismo, evidenciaron que el CDA se relaciona con el P del suelo en las especies con baja densidad de la madera y, en las de densidad alta, se correlaciona con Ca, K, y Mg. Adicionalmente, se observó que el CDA de la familia Fabaceae no presenta correlación con los nutrientes del suelo, lo que evidencia que la respuesta del CDA a los nutrientes varía de acuerdo con el grupo ecológico, funcional y/o taxonómico (Baribault et al., 2012). Por su parte, Toledo et al. (2011) encontraron que el CDA incrementa con la fertilidad del suelo en bosques lluviosos tropicales. Sin embargo, los contenidos edáficos de N y P presentaron poca relación con el CDA (Toledo et al., 2011). Esto muestra que la influencia y limitación que ejercen los nutrientes sobre el CDA aún se encuentra en debate -y con grandes incertidumbres.

La región del Pacífico colombiano, tambien denominada Chocó biogeográfico, es considerada como uno de los hotspots de mayor biodiversidad y endemismo del mundo (Myers et al., 2000), dado que cuenta con más de ≈7.8 millones de hectáreas de bosques naturales en Colombia, de las cuales entre el 65 y 88 % son bosques maduros bien conservados, dependiendo de la subregión (IIAP, 2015). Además, esta región posee una de las precipitaciones más altas del mundo (≈10 000 mm anuales) (Poveda & Mesa, 2000); por lo que ofrece condiciones excepcionales para evaluar la influencia del suelo sobre las tasas del CDA. Por tal razón, basados en que los bosques de alta pluviosidad presentan menor contenido de P edáfico (Austin & Vitousek, 1998), pero al mismo tiempo registran altos niveles de N total (Santiago et al., 2005; Posada & Schuur, 2011; Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016), se plantearon las siguientes preguntas de investigación: i) ¿cómo explican las condiciones edáficas el CDA a nivel de categorías diamétricas, densidad de madera y grupos ecológicos en los bosques del Pacífico colombiano?, y ii) ¿cuales son los nutrientes edáficos que más explican la variación en el CDA? En este sentido, el objetivo de la presente investigación fue evaluar el CDA a nivel de categorías diamétricas, densidad de madera y grupos ecológicos en tres bosques del Pacífico colombiano, así como su posible relación con los nutrientes del suelo.

MATERIALES Y MÉTODOS

Área de estudio. El estudio se desarrolló en los bosques lluviosos tropicales de las localidades de Salero (Municipio de Unión Panamericana), Opogodó (Municipio de Condoto) y Pacurita (Municipio de Quibdó), en el departamento del Chocó, Colombia. Estas localidades hacen parte de la subregión ecogeográfica Central Norte del Chocó biogeográfico, que comprende las cuencas altas de los ríos Atrato y San Juan, localizadas en unidades de paisaje de piedemonte y colinas bajas con suelos húmedos de terrazas y rocas de tipo sedimentario transicional (Poveda et al., 2004). Los bosques de Salero presentan una precipitación anual de 7500 mm, con una altitud de entre 100 y 150 m y una topografía ligeramente quebrada. En Opogodó, la precipitación es de 8000 mm anuales, con una altitud de 70 m y una topografía plana. A su vez, en Pacurita, la precipitación es de 10 000 mm anuales, la topografía es quebrada y la altitud es de 130 m (Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016).

Los suelos de los tres bosques estudiados son ultisoles, pero con diferencias en contenidos de nutrientes y textura ( Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016). Los suelos son extremadamente ácidos, con alta saturación de aluminio en los bosques de Salero y Pacurita, mientras que los bosques de Opogodó presentan concentraciones muy altas de MO (promedio 11.94 %) y N total (0.61 %). Por otra parte, en las tres zonas, los valores edáficos de P (1.32 ppm), Mg (0.28 cmolc.kg-1), Ca (0.38 cmolc.kg-1) y CICE (1.03 cmolc.kg-1) son muy bajos, mientras que los de K son intermedios (0.23 cmolc.kg-1) (Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016).

La composición florística arbórea está dominada por especies como Mabea chocoensis Croizat, Pouteria sp., Oenocarpus bataua Mart., Eschweilera pittieri R. Knuth, Protium apiculatum Swart, Croton jorgei J. Murillo, Mabea occidentalis Benth., Calophyllum auriculatum Merr., Eschweilera sclerophylla Cuatrec., Wettinia quinaria (O.F. Cook & Doyle) Burret., y Brosimum utile (Kunth) Oken., entre otras, y predominan familias botánicas como Sapotaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Clusiaceae, Fabaceae, Moraceae, Lecythidaceae, Arecaceae y Myristicaceae (García et al., 2003). En los bosques maduros de Opogodó se han registrado entre 75 y 90 especies ha-1, en Pacurita se ha registrado un promedio de 95 especies.ha-1, y en Salero se han observado entre 179 y 219 especies.ha-1 (Quinto et al., 2019). Estos bosques maduros son bien conservados, con pocas evidencias de intervenciones antrópicas recientes.

Métodos

Establecimiento de parcelas permanentes y medición de los diámetros de los árboles. En la localidad de Salero se instalaron dos parcelas permanentes de investigación, establecidas entre abril y agosto del año 1998 mediante la metodología BIOTROP (García et al., 2003). Cada una de estas parcelas consiste en un rectángulo de 500 x 20 m (1 ha), dividido en 25 unidades de registro (cuadrantes) de 20 x 20 m (400 m2), las cuales fueron designadas como unidades de muestreo de productividad, diversidad y dominancia arbórea en estudios previos (Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2017a; Quinto-Mosquera et al., 2019). Estas parcelas fueron censadas e inventariadas entre los años 1998 y 2018. Por su parte, en las localidades de Opogodó y Pacurita se utilizaron parcelas instaladas en el año 2013, las cuales poseen un área de 100 x 100 m, divididas también en 25 unidades de registro de 20 x 20 m (400 m2). En Opogodó se establecieron tres parcelas de una hectárea, mientras que en Pacurita se instalaron dos parcelas de 1 ha. Las parcelas de Opogodó y de Pacurita fueron censadas e inventariadas entre los años 2013 y 2018 (Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno, 2017a). En estas parcelas se midió el diámetro a la altura del pecho (DAP) (1.30 m sobre el nivel del suelo) de todos los árboles con DAP ≥ 5.0 cm. Estas mediciones se realizaron en la parte cilíndrica del árbol, en áreas libres de nudos, ramas, bambas y/o raíces adventicias. Estas mediciones se realizaron en el mes de agosto de los años 1998, 2005, 2008 y 2018 en los bosques de Salero y durante el mismo mes en los años 2013, 2014, 2015 y 2019 en Opogodó y Pacurita, en aras de establecer el CDA. Además, en cuadrantes de 400 m2 de todas las parcelas se realizaron mediciones de los parámetros fisicoquímicos del suelo (Quinto-Mosquera et al., 2019).

Identificación taxonómica, clasificación según grupos ecológicos de especies y por la capacidad de fijación de N. Se identificaron todas las morfoespecies hasta el máximo nivel taxonómico, según el sistema de clasificación APG IV (APG IV, 2016). Esta identificación se llevó a cabo utilizando la clave especializada de Gentry (1993), y por confrontación con el material depositado en la colección del herbario CHOCÓ de la Universidad Tecnológica del Chocó. Posteriormente, se realizó una clasificación de las especies de acuerdo con sus características ecológicas. Para ello, se empleó información de varios listados e inventarios de especies que incluían características como requerimientos de luz, tolerancia a la sombra, tasa fotosintética, ciclos de vida, densidad de madera, entre otros, con lo que se conformaron dos grupos ecológicos de especies (pioneras y climácicas), similar a lo realizado por Quinto-Mosquera y Moreno-Hurtado (2011). Luego de ello, se separaron las especies arbóreas de acuerdo a su capacidad de fijar N atmosférico (Baribault et al., 2012). Los árboles se agruparon en tres categorías: la primera, compuesta por individuos de la familia Fabaceae, que se caracterizan por su capacidad de fijar N atmosférico biológicamente; la segunda, conformada por individuos de la familia Arecaceae, que se caracterizan por ser monocotiledóneas no fijadoras de N atmosférico; y la tercera, conformada por los individuos de las familias restantes, que son dicotiledóneas y no tienen la capacidad de fijar N atmosférico.

Estimación y clasificación de la densidad de la madera. Para estimar esta variable, se tomaron los valores publicados en dos bases de datos internacionales de densidad de madera generadas en bosques tropicales (Brown, 1997; Baker et al., 2004). En los casos en los que alguna especie o género encontrado en las parcelas no estuviese reportado en estas bases de datos, se empleó el promedio del género o de la familia. Para los individuos indeterminados taxonómicamente se empleó el promedio de la parcela. Posteriormente, los árboles se agruparon así: densidad baja (0.26-0.49 g.cm-3), media (0.49-0.733 g.cm-3) y alta (0.73-0.97 g.cm-3) similar a lo presentado en estudios previos (Baribault et al., 2012).

Determinación del crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo. Para determinar el CDA se empleó la fórmula: CDA = (DAPfinal - DAPinicial)/(años) (Melo & Vargas 2003, Toledo et al. 2011).

Se realizaron análisis de CDA para las siguientes categorías diamétricas: categoría I (5.0-10.0 cm DAP), categoría II (10.0-30.0 cm DAP) y categoría III (>30.0 cm DAP).

Análisis de los datos. Para evaluar el efecto de las localidades, categorías diamétricas, densidad de madera (baja, media y alta), mecanismos nutricionales de especies (Fabaceae, Arecaceae y otras), familias, géneros y especies arbóreas sobre el CDA, se utilizaron las pruebas no paramétricas de Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis (Kw) y de rangos múltiples de Nemenyi, pues los datos no cumplieron los supuestos (normalidad y homogeneidad de varianzas) para pruebas paramétricas. Para el análisis de CDA, en los sectores de Opogodó y Pacurita, se tuvieron en cuenta todos los individuos (4015 árboles), de los cuales el 3 % presentó valores negativos cercanos a cero (≤ -0.1), por lo que, cuando se excluyeron de los análisis, no se generaron diferencias en las tendencias evaluadas. En la localidad de Salero (866 árboles), solo se tuvieron en cuenta los valores positivos de crecimiento. Para relacionar las variables edáficas (acidez, contenido de nutrientes y textura) con el CDA (Sullivan et al., 2014) se emplearon regresiones lineales simples y múltiples y correlaciones de Spearman. A nivel de especies arbóreas, se seleccionaron las más abundantes y con individuos de distintas categorías diamétricas para realizar las correlaciones entre el CDA y las variables edáficas. Luego, solo se presentaron en los resultados las especies con correlaciones significativas del CDA con las variables del suelo evaluadas. Los análisis de CDA se realizaron a nivel de individuos (N = 4881), especies arbóreas dominantes, unidades de muestreo (cuadrantes de 400 m2) (N = 175) y parcelas de 1 ha (N = 7). Se empleó Statgraphics Centurion XV (Statistical Graphics Corp., 2002) para realizar análisis (regresiones lineales y múltiples) y, por otra parte, se emplearon librerías para las correlaciones, las cuales fueron ejecutadas en el entorno de programación R (R Core Team, 2012).

RESULTADOS

La tasa de CDA promedio (± E.E.) fue mayor en la localidad de Pacurita con 0.33 ± 0.03 cm.año-1 (N=1793), seguida de Opogodó con 0.28 ± 0.03 cm.año-1 (N=2136) y, finalmente, Salero con 0.25 ± 0.01 cm.año-1 (N= 967) (Kw = 8.189; p-value = 0.01663). A nivel de categorías diamétricas, se evidenció que las categorías intermedias II (10.0-30.0 cm) y III (> 30.0 cm) presentaron las mayores tasas de CDA, con 0.31 ± 0.02 cm.año-1 y 0.30 ± 0.06 cm.año-1 respectivamente, en comparación con la categoría inferior I (5.0-10.0 cm) (Kw = 20.1; p-value < 0.001; N=4881). A nivel de densidad de la madera, se evidenció que las especies de baja densidad presentaron mayor tasa de CDA, con 0.39 ± 0.04 cm.año-1. Sin embargo, no hubo diferencias significativas con respecto a las demás densidades de madera evaluadas (Kw = 2.49; p = 0.287). A nivel de grupos ecológicos (pioneras y climácicas), se evidenció que no hubo diferencias significativas en el CDA (Mann-Whitney = 0,264; p = 0.94). A nivel de mecanismos nutricionales, se evidenciaron diferencias significativas en el CDA (Kw = 88.49; p<0.01), siendo la familia Fabaceae la de mayor CDA, con 0.42 ± 0.07 cm.año-1 (Tabla 1).

Tabla 1: Tasas de crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo (cm.año-1) en función de las localidades, categorías diamétricas, densidad de la madera, capacidad de fijar N atmosférico y grupo ecológico en bosques tropicales del Pacífico colombiano.

Localidades Kw p-value
Opogodó Pacurita Salero
CDA (cm.año-1) 0.28 ± 0.03 b 0.33 ± 0.03 a 0.25 ± 0.01 b 8.189 0.0166
Categorías diamétricas
5.0-10.0 cm 10.0-30.0 cm >30.0 cm
CDA (cm.año-1) 0.25 ± 0.04 b 0.31 ± 0.02 a 0.30 ± 0.06 a 20.11 < 0,001
Tipos de densidad de madera
Baja Media Alta
CDA (cm.año-1) 0.39 ± 0.04 0.26 ± 0.02 0.27 ± 0.04 2.49 0.287
Capacidad de fijar N atmosférico
Arecaceae Fabaceae Otras Familias
CDA (cm.año-1) 0.07 ± 0.03 c 0.42 ± 0.07 a 0.31 ± 0.02 b 88.49 < 0.001
Grupo ecológico Mw
Climácicas Pioneras
CDA (cm.año-1) 0.30± 0.02 0.29± 0.03 2,64 0,94

Nota: CDA es el promedio (± error estándar) de crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo, Kw es la prueba de Kruskal-Wallis, y Mw es la prueba de Mann-Whitney. N = 4881. Las letras a, b y c indican diferencias significativas entre los promedios de CDA en cada análisis particular (localidades, categorías diamétricas, tipos de densidad de madera, capacidad de fijar N atmosférico, grupo ecológico).

Tabla 2: Correlaciones de Spearman entre las condiciones edáficas y las tasas de crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo (cm.año-1) a nivel de parcelas (N=7) en bosques pluviales tropicales del Pacífico colombiano. Los asteriscos indican la significancia de las correlaciones (* p<0.05; **p<0.01; *** p<0.001; ns p>0.05).

Condiciones edáficas General Densidad baja Pioneras Fabaceae
Correlación Correlación Correlación Correlación
pH -0.003 ns 0.494 ns -0,303 ns 0.713 ns
Materia orgánica (%) 0.180 ns 0.686 ns -0,028 ns 0.884**
P (ppm) -0.673 ns -0.729 ns -0.829* 0.036 ns
N Total (%) 0.216 ns 0.704 ns 0,001 ns 0.911**
Mg (cmolc.kg-1) 0.114 ns 0.344 ns -0,165 ns 0.736 ns
CICE (cmolc.kg-1) 0.020 ns -0.534 ns 0,221 ns -0.895**
Arena (%) 0.414 ns 0.841* 0,238 ns 0.827*
Limo (%) -0.495 ns -0.825* -0,375 ns -0.706 ns
Arcilla (%) -0.239 ns -0.777* 0.008 ns -0.935**
Al (cmolc.kg-1) -0.016 ns -0.632 ns 0.202 ns -0.858*

Relación entre las tasas de crecimiento arbóreo y las variables edáficas. Se determinó que las correlaciones entre las condiciones edáficas y el CDA a nivel de individuos arbóreos (N=4881) y de unidades de muestreo (400 m2; N=175) no fueron significativas, mientras que, a nivel de parcelas, en las especies pioneras hubo una correlación negativa significativa entre las tasas de CDA y el P del suelo (Tabla 2).

El CDA de los árboles con baja densidad de madera presentó correlaciones significativas positivas con la MO, N total y arena, mientras que, con el contenido de fósforo, limo y arcilla, la correlación fue negativa (Tabla 2). Las tasas de CDA de los árboles de la familia Fabaceae presentaron correlaciones positivas con pH, MO, N total, Mg y arena, mientras que, con CICE, limo, arcilla y Al, las correlaciones fueron negativas (Tabla 2).

A nivel de especies arbóreas, se observó que el CDA de Calophyllum auratum se correlacionó negativamente con pH, MO, arena y N total, mientras que, con Al, CICE, limo y arcilla, la correlación fue positiva (Tabla 3). Por su parte, las tasas de CDA de Protium apiculatum se correlacionaron positivamente con Al, CICE y arcilla, mientras que, con pH, MO y N total, la correlación fue negativa. Pourouma chocoana registró una correlación positiva con el pH y el contenido de arena, así como una negativa con Al, CICE, limo y arcilla. Por su parte, Aniba puchury-minor se correlacionó positivamente con el P disponible (Tabla 3).

La tasa de CDA de Sloanea fragrans se relacionó positivamente con los MO, K y N totales del suelo. Por su parte, Virola sp. se correlacionó positivamente con el P disponible y el limo, mientras que, con MO, arcilla y N total, la correlación fue negativa. Faramea multiflora se correlacionó negativamente con MO, Mg y N total, mientras que Cespedesia spathulata mostró un mayor CDA en suelos con bajo contenido de P disponible (Tabla 3).

Tabla 3: Correlación de Spearman entre las condiciones edáficas y crecimiento diamétrico arbóreo (cm.año-1) de especies dominantes. Los asteriscos indican la significancia de las correlaciones (* p<0.05; **p<0.01; *** p<0.001; ns p>0.05).

Suelos Calophyllum auratum Protium apiculatum Pourouma chocoana Aniba puchury-minor Sloanea fragrans Virola sp. Faramea multiflora
Correlación Correlación Correlación Correlación Correlación Correlación Correlación
pH -0.138* -0.171 ns 0.310*** -0.105 ns -0.027 ns 0.186 ns 0.102 ns
M.O. -0.162* -0.249** 0.112 ns -0.303 ns 0.461** -0.374* -0.244*
P -0.086 ns -0.080 ns 0.029 ns 0.332 ns -0.276 ns 0.303* 0.072 ns
Al 0.179** 0.259** -0.278** 0.258 ns 0.205 ns -0.037 ns 0.050 ns
Mg -0.112 ns -0.148 ns -0.099 ns -0.179 ns 0.054 ns 0.187 ns -0.275*
K -0.064 ns 0.021 ns 0.141 ns -0.077 ns 0.281 ns 0.102 ns 0.136 ns
CICE 0.150* 0.260** -0.193* 0.198 ns 0.007 ns -0.040 ns 0.055 ns
Arena -0.148* -0.146 ns 0.307** -0.022 ns 0.278 ns -0.102 ns 0.010 ns
Limo 0.143* 0.121 ns -0.276** 0.049 ns -0.261 ns 0.306* 0.009 ns
Arcilla 0.157* 0.215* -0.262** 0.080 ns -0.258 ns -0.344* -0.071 ns
N -0.165** -0.226* 0.108 ns -0.293 ns 0.461** -0.404** -0.232 ns
Suelos Symphonia globulifera Eschweilera sclerophylla Cespedesia spathulata
Correlación Correlación Correlación
pH 0.405* 0.073 ns -0.007 ns
M.O. -0.374* -0.054 ns 0.074 ns
P 0.259 ns 0.145* -0.340*
N -0.396* -0.054 ns -0.065 ns

DISCUSIÓN

En los bosques lluviosos tropicales del Pacífico colombiano se registró un promedio general en las tasas de CDA de 0.29 cm.año-1, el cual se encuentra dentro del rango de 0.05 a 0.60 cm.año-1 reportado para bosques tropicales (Turner, 2001). Estos bosques tambien están dentro del rango de CDA para para bosques tropicales de baja altitud de 0.08 a 0.80 cm.año-1 (Chambers et al., 1998; Alder et al., 2002), lo cual evidencia que la tasa de CDA registrada en los ecosistemas del Pacífico es lenta, similar a lo registrado en la mayoría de los bosques tropicales (Turner, 2001; Baribault et al., 2012).

Los árboles del Pacífico presentan una amplia variación en el CDA; se presentaron diferencias a nivel de localidades, categorías diamétricas y mecanismos nutricionales, lo cual es similar a lo reportado en estudios desarrollados en bosques tropicales que evidencian este tipo de variación (Turner, 2001; Toledo et al., 2011; Baribault et al., 2012), además de corroborar la influencia de factores como la calidad del sitio o condiciones ambientales, la edad del bosque y características intrinsecas como la genética, la densidad de individuos, los grupos taxonómico y ecológico, entre otros, que tienen incidencia aunque no se evaluaron (Russo et al., 2005; Restrepo et al., 2019).

Particularmente, Soong et al. (2020), en bosques con niveles de precipitación similar en la Guayana Francesa, registraron tasas de CDA y recambio que variaron significativamente entre sitios. Asimismo, Russo et al., (2005) observaron tasas de CDA significativamente diferentes en bosques con diferentes tipos de suelo, siendo mayor el CDA en los suelos más fértiles. Esto muestra las diferencias de CDA entre sitios, similar a lo registrado en el presente estudio. Además de ello, en los bosques estudiados en el Pacífico colombiano, las tasas del CDA fueron mayores en los árboles de categorías diamétricas intermedias (10.0-30.0 cm) y altas (> 30.0 cm), similar a lo registrado en algunas investigaciones realizadas en bosques tropicales. Por ejemplo, Paoli y Curran (2007) denotaron mayores tasas de CDA en árboles de mayor tamaño (> 60 cm de DAP) en bosques de Borneo en Indonesia, aunque la categoría diametrica de dicho estudio presentó un mayor tamaño que la establecida en esta investigación. Asimismo, Russo et al. (2005) evidenciaron mayores tasas de CDA en árboles de mayor diámetro (20-40 cm de DAP) en bosques tropicales de Malasia. El hecho de que los árboles de mayor tamaño presentaran un mayor CDA puede explicarse por el hecho de que estos se encuentran más desarrollados y pueden acceder fácilmente a recursos como agua, radiación solar y nutrientes (Turner, 2001).

¿Qué tanto explican las condiciones físicoquímicas del suelo el CDA en los bosques del Pacífico colombiano? En este estudio se observó que las condiciones edáficas se correlacionan muy poco con las tasas de CDA a nivel de individuos y de unidades de muestreo (400 m2; N=175), lo cual seguramente se debe al alto nivel de variación de los datos de CDA evaluados a nivel de individuos (coeficiente de variación, CV=422.4 %) y de cuadrantes (400 m2) (CV=141.8 %), en comparación con la registrada a nivel de parcelas (CV=26.2 %). Esta diferencia en el nivel de variación posiblemente dificultó la posibilidad de evidenciar la relación entre las variables edáficas y las tasas de CDA a esas escalas. Al respecto, Baribault et al. (2012) observaron resultados similares; no evidenciaron correlaciones significativas entre el CDA y las condiciones edáficas a nivel de individuos arbóreos.

A nivel de parcelas se observó que las tasas de CDA y el P disponible del suelo se correlacionan negativamente. Asimismo, en las especies pioneras hubo una correlación negativa entre las tasas de CDA y el P disponible del suelo, lo cual posiblemente se deba al hecho de que la disponibilidad de P edáfico fue muy baja (entre 1 y 2.00 ppm) y con poca variación ( Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016). Por consiguiente, no hubo un verdadero gradiente de disponibilidad del nutriente en el suelo, lo cual dificulta la identificación de patrones concluyentes en la influencia del P del suelo sobre variables biológicas como el CDA. En sintesis, los resultados de la relación entre el P edáfico y el CDA del presente estudio fueron poco concluyentes y no permiten corroborar la hipótesis sobre la limitación del CDA por la disponilidad del P del suelo. Es importante mencionar que la baja disponibilidad de P en los suelos estudiados posiblemente se deba a factores ambientales como la tasa de meteorización de rocas, el tipo de mineral arcilloso, la retención en óxidos de Fe y Al, el pH, la textura, el contenido de MO, la actividad de microorganismos, la alta precipitación y la lixiviación (Schlesinger, 1997). En especial, la alta precipitación produce pérdidas de P por lixiviación, que superan los ingresos por meteorización de rocas (Austin & Vitousek, 1998). Asimismo, las lluvias intensas generan una acumulación de cationes ácidos (Al e H) en el suelo, los cuales tienden a inmovilizar el P por absorción sobre la superficie de óxidos de Fe y Al (Schlesinger, 1997) y también por la formación de fosfatos Al y de Fe (AlPO4·2H2O, FePO4·2H2O) al reaccionar con iones libres de Fe3+ y Al+ en la solución del suelo (Reed et al., 2011). Por lo tanto, es razonable inferir que tanto las pérdidas por lixiviación generada por la excesiva pluviosidad de la región como la retención en óxidos de Fe y Al son los mayores responsables del bajo contenido del P disponible en suelos tropicales como los del Chocó biogeográfico (Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016).

El CDA registrado en los bosques del Pacífico colombiano presentó poca relación con los nutrientes del suelo a nivel general, pero sí hubo correlaciones entre algunos parametros de fertilidad y el CDA de especies de baja densidad de madera y de la familia Fabaceae. Al respecto, diversas investigaciones han planteado que, dependiendo del estado de desarrollo en el que se encuentren, las especies arbóreas especialistas de ambientes pobres en nutrientes tienen alta densidad de madera, con lento crecimiento, menor mortalidad y una baja y poco variable tasa de CDA, comparadas con las especies generalistas y especialistas de hábitats ricos en nutrientes, que tienen baja densidad de madera, rápido crecimiento y alta mortalidad (Chapin, 1980; Soong et al., 2020). Debido a ello, cuando las especies adaptadas a suelos pobres en nutrientes experimentan incrementos en su disponibilidad edáfica, su habilidad para responder con aumentos en CDA es limitada y poco evidente (Chapin, 1980) y sus tasas de crecimiento generalmente se correlacionan poco con las concentraciones edáficas de nutrientes (Soong et al., 2020). Esta es una de las posibles razones por las cuales no se evidenciaron correlaciones entre las especies de alta densidad de madera y las climácicas (no pioneras) con los parámetros de fertilidad edáfica en los bosques lluviosos del Pacífico colombiano. Más aun si se tiene en cuenta que el crecimiento de los árboles depende del genotipo y de las condiciones ambientales en las que se encuentran y es producto de la interacción entre procesos como fotosíntesis, respiración, transpiración y nutrición mineral (Lambers et al., 2008), con lo cual se evidencia una posible mayor influencia de factores genotípicos que edáficos sobre el CDA evaluado en estos grupos de especies.

Por su parte, el CDA de las especies con baja densidad de madera presentó correlaciones significativas positivas con MO, N total y arena, mientras que, con el contenido de P, limo y arcilla, la correlación fue negativa. Las tasas de CDA de los árboles de la familia Fabaceae presentaron correlaciones significativas positivas con pH, MO, N total, Mg y arena, mientras que, con CICE, limo, arcilla y Al, las correlaciones fueron negativas. Esto muestra que estas especies arbóreas (Fabaceae y de baja densidad) son más suceptibles a los cambios en los contenidos edáficos de nutrientes, y que, además, presentan una limitación múltiple de nutrientes del suelo en sus tasas de CDA, similar a lo planteado por Russo et al. (2005), Paoli y Curran (2007), Baribault et al. (2012) y Wright et al. (2011), quienes manifiestan que múltiples nutrientes tales como el N total, P, K, Mg, Fe y Mn extraíbles limitan el crecimiento arbóreo y la productividad primaria neta de bosques lluviosos tropicales de baja altitud.

El hecho de que las especies de baja densidad de madera presentaran una limitación múltiple de nutrientes del suelo en su CDA probablemente se deba a que las especies con este tipo de densidad generalmente presentan altas tasas de crecimiento vegetal, alto recambio foliar, mejor adaptación a suelos fértiles y mayores requimientos de nutrientes para la construcción de tejidos (Oelmann et al., 2010). Esto explica la relación de estas especies con los contenidos de nutrientes (MO y N) registrados en los bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Contrario a ello, Baribault et al. (2012) reportaron correlaciones entre este tipo de árboles de baja densidad con los contenidos edáficos de K y P en bosques tropicales. En consecuencia, se puede concluir que, aunque el CDA de este tipo de especies arbóreas se encuentra limitado por múltiples nutrientes, la limitación del CDA puede cambiar de una región a otra -o de un ecosistema a otro.

En términos de mecanismos nutricionales, en los bosques del Pacífico colombiano se denotó una relación entre el CDA de la familia Fabaceae (fijadora de N) y las condiciones edáficas, contrario a lo reportado por Baribault et al. (2012), quienes observaron que el crecimiento arbóreo de esta familia botánica no presentó correlación con los nutrientes del suelo. La limitación multiple del CDA de las Fabaceas probablemente se deba al hecho de que su capacidad de fijación de N a menudo reduce la limitación por el P, pues las especies fijadoras de N pueden utilizar N para la producción de fosfatos en la rizosfera que incrementan la disponibilidad de PO4 por la disolución de formas recalcitrantes de P (Treseder & Vitousek, 2001). Asimismo, la fijación de N incrementa la tasa de fotosíntesis y producción de carbono disponible para las asociaciones con micorrizas (Iversen & Norby, 2008), lo cual puede conllevar un incremento en el acceso a PO4 y a otros nutrientes. Esta situación puede explicar la correlación entre algunos nutrientes y el CDA de la familia Fabaceae registrada en este estudio.

A nivel de especies, se evidenciaron correlaciones entre el CDA y algunas variables edáficas, en especial en Calophyllum auratum, Protium apiculatum, Pourouma chocoana, Aniba puchury-minor, Sloanea fragrans, Virola sp., Faramea multiflora, Symphonia globulifera, Eschweilera sclerophylla y Cespedesia spathulata. Asimismo, se observó que cada especie presenta un CDA diferente con relación a la disponibilidad de nutrientes del suelo; al parecer los requerimientos nutricionales son diferentes para cada especie arbórea y/o grupo taxonómico (Baribault et al., 2012). Especies como Cespedesia spathulata incluso mostraron un mayor CDA en suelos con muy bajo contenido de P disponible, lo cual demuestra que, a pesar de que muchos árboles de bosques lluviosos tropicales crecen sobre suelos poco fértiles y relativamente pobres en nutrientes (Whitmore, 1998; Turner, 2001; Dalling et al., 2016), la disponibilidad de nutrientes a menudo determina una gran proporción de la variación en las tasas de CDA. Asimismo, lo observado en este estudio es similar a lo reportado por Baribault et al. (2012), quienes denotaron que el crecimiento de los árboles se correlaciona positivamente con los nutrientes del suelo como Ca, K, Mg y P, pero rara vez con el N. En conclusión, se evidencia que la relación entre el CDA y cada nutriente del suelo varía de una especie a otra en bosques tropicales.

¿Cuales son los nutrientes que más explican la variación en el crecimiento diamétrico de los árboles en bosques del Pacífico colombiano? Aunque diferentes estudios han propuesto la hipótesis de que la productividad y el crecimiento de los árboles en bosques lluviosos tropicales de baja altitud se encuentran limitados por el P edáfico (Tanner et al., 1992; Vitousek et al., 2010), en los bosques del Pacífico colombiano se observó que el CDA se relacionó con nutrientes como N total, MO, y Mg, principalmente en especies de baja densidad de madera y en fabáceas. Por consiguiente, se puede concluir que el CDA presenta una limitación múltiple de nutrientes (MO, N total y Mg) (Dalling et al., 2016; Quinto-Mosquera et al., 2017b). Estos nutrientes, especialmente N y MO, han sido considerados como limitantes de la productividad de bosques tropicales (LeBauer & Treseder, 2008; Sayer et al., 2012). En consecuencia, se evidencia que el CDA es determinado por las concentraciones de MO y N que son abundantes en estos bosques (Quinto-Mosquera & Moreno-Hurtado, 2016), lo cual evidencia que el funcionamiento del ecosistema no siempre es condicionado por el nutriente limitante (ley del mínimo) (Salisbury & Ross, 1994), sino también por los elementos que están en cantidades óptimas. Además, estos resultados que muestran una limitación múltiple por N total, MO, y Mg y no por el P edáfico, lo cual se relaciona con lo planteado por Davidson y Howarth (2007) quienes consideran que la limitación de nutrientes es sinérgica y que, contrario al planteamiento inicial de la ley del mínimo, lo que se presenta en bosques tropicales es una limitación sinérgica por nutrientes como N y P, puesto que, cuando aumenta la disponibilidad de uno, sinérgicamente se produce limitación por el otro (Davidson & Howarth 2007). En este sentido, se puede conjeturar que posiblemente la limitación por P edáfico de la región está siendo mitigada por estrategias adaptativas nutricionales como la asociación con micorrizas (Lambers et al., 2008), con lo cual, de forma sinérgica, se evidencia la limitación por otros nutrientes (N y Mg) y elementos (MO) del suelo como sucede en estos bosques.

Acknowledgements

AGRADECIMIENTOS

La presente investigación fue financiada con recursos del proyecto titulado Evaluación del efecto de la fertilización del suelo sobre la producción neta del ecosistema en áreas degradadas por minería, como estrategia para potenciar la captura de carbono y la venta de servicios ambientales en el Chocó Biogeográfico (código 1128-852-72243), presentado por la Universidad Tecnológica del Chocó (D.L.C.), la Universidad Nacional de Colombia (sede Medellín), la Universidad de Valladolid (España), el Instituto de Investigaciones Ambientales del Pacífico John Von Neumann (IIAP) y el SENA Chocó, y aprobado por el Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación.

REFERENCIAS

Angelsen, A., Brockhaus, M., Kanninen, M., Sills, E., Sunderlin, W., & Wertz-Kanounnikoff, S. (2009). Realising REDD+: National strategy and policy options. CIFOR. http://www.cifor.org/publications/pdf_files/books/bangelsen1201-references.pdf [Link]

Alder, D., Oavika, F., Sánchez, M., Silva, J., Hout, P., & Wright, H. (2002). A comparison of species growth rates from four moist tropical forest regions using increment-size ordination. International Forestry Review, 4(3), 196-205. https://doi.org/10.1505/IFOR.4.3.196.17398 [Link]

Ashton, P., & Hall, P. (1992). Comparisons of structure among mixed dipterocarp forests of north-western Borneo. Journal of Ecology, 80(3), 459-481. https://doi.org/10.2307/2260691 [Link]

Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APG IV) (2016). An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG IV. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 181(1), 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1111/boj.12385 [Link]

Austin, A., & Vitousek, P. (1998). Nutrient dynamics on a precipitation gradient in Hawaii. Oecologia 113, 519-529. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050405 [Link]

Baker, T., Phillips, O., Malhi, Y., Almeida, S., Arroyo, L., di Fiore, A., Erwin, T., Killeen, T., Laurance, S., Laurance, W., Lewis, S., Lloyd, J., Monteagudo, A., Neill, D., Patiño, S., Pitman, N., Silva, J., & Vásquez-Martínez R. (2004). Variation in wood density determines spatial patterns in Amazonian forest biomass. Global Change Biology, 10(5), 545-562. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2004.00751.x [Link]

Baker, T., Swaine, M., & Burslem, D. (2003). Variation in tropical forest growth rates: combined effects of functional group composition and resource availability. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 6(1), 21-36. https://doi.org/10.1078/1433-8319-00040 [Link]

Baribault, T., Kobe, R., & Finley, A. (2012). Tropical tree growth is correlated with soil phosphorus, potassium, and calcium, though not for legumes. Ecological Monographs, 82(2), 189-203. https://www.jstor.org/stable/41739364 [Link]

Brown, S. (1997). Estimating biomass and biomass change of tropical forests: A primer. Food and Agriculture Organization. http://www.fao.org/3/w4095e/w4095e00.htm [Link]

Büntgen, U., Krusic, P. J., Piermattei, A. Coomes, D., Esper, J., Myglan, V., Kirdyanov, A., Camarero, J., Crivellaro, A., & Körner, C. (2019). Limited capacity of tree growth to mitigate the global greenhouse effect under predicted warming. Nature Communications, 10, 2171https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10174-4 [Link]

Chambers, J., Higuchi, N., & Schimel, J. (1998). Ancient trees inAmazonia. Nature, 391, 135-136. https://doi.org/10.1038/34325 [Link]

Chapin III, F. (1980). The mineral nutrition of wild plants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 11, 233-260 https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.es.11.110180.001313 [Link]

Clark, D., Clark, D., & Read, J. (1998). Edaphic variation and the mesoscale distribution of tree species in a Neotropical rain forest. Journal of Ecology, 86(1), 101-112. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2745.1998.00238.x [Link]

Clark, D., Hurtado, J., & Saatchi, S. (2015). Tropical rain forest structure, tree growth and dynamics along a 2700-m elevational transect in Costa Rica. PLoS ONE, 10(4), e0122905. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122905 [Link]

Clark, D. (2002). Are tropical forests an important carbon sink? Reanalysis of the long-term plot data. Ecological Applications, 12(1), 3-7. https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2002)0120003:ATFAIC2.0.CO;2 [Link]

Clark, D., Brown, S., Kicklighter, D., Chambers, J., Thomlinson, J., Holland, E., & Ni, J. (2001). Net primary production in forest: an evaluation and sinthesis of existing field data. Ecological Aplications, 11(2), 356- 370. https://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2001)011(0371:NPPITF)2.0.CO;2 [Link]

Dalling, J., Heineman, K., López, O., Wright, J., & Turner, B. (2016). Nutrient availability in tropical rain forests: The paradigm of phosphorus limitation. En G. Goldstein & L. S. Santiago (Eds.), Tropical tree physiology. Adaptations and responses in a changing environment (pp. 261-273). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27422-5_12 [Link]

Davidson, E. A., & Howarth, R. W. (2007). Environmental science: Nutrients in synergy. Nature, 449, 1000-1001. https://doi.org/10.1038/4491000a [Link]

Dixon, R., Brown, S., Houghton, R., Solomon, A., Trexler, M., & Wisniewski, J. (1994). Carbon pools and flux of global forest ecosystems. Science, 263(5144), 185-190. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/263/5144/185 [Link]

Field, C., Behrenfeld, M., Randerson, J., & Falkowski, P. (1998). Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components. Science, 281(5374), 237-240. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.281.5374.237 [Link]

García, F., Ramos, Y., Palacios, J., Arroyo, J., Mena, A., & González, M. (2003). SALERO Diversidad biológica de un bosque pluvial tropical (bp-T). Editorial Guadalupe Ltda.

Gentry, A. (1993). A field guide to the families and genera of woody plants of Northwest South Amercian. Conservation International.

Houghton, R. (2005). Aboveground forest biomass and the global carbon balance. Global Change Biology, 11(6), 945-958. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2005.00955.x [Link]

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC (2014). Climate Change 2014: Synthesis report. Contribution of working groups I, II and III to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. IPCC. https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/ [Link]

Instituto de Investigaciones Ambientales del Pacífico (IIAP) (2015). Plan integral de cambio climático del departamento del Chocó (PICC-Chocó). Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible, IIAP.

Iversen, C., & Norby, R. (2008). Nitrogen limitation in a sweetgum plantation: Implications for carbon allocation and storage. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 38(5), 1021-1032. https://doi.org/10.1139/X07-213 [Link]

Lambers, H., Chapin III., F., & Pons, T. (2008). Plant physiological ecology (2da ed.). Springer Science Business Media.

LeBauer, D., & Treseder, K. (2008). Nitrogen limitation of net primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems is globally distributed. Ecology, 89(2), 371-379. https://doi.org/10.1890/06-2057.1 [Link]

Melo, O., & Vargas, R. (2003). Evaluación ecológica y silvicultural de ecosistemas boscosos. Universidad del Tolima, Impresiones CONDE.

Myers, N., Mittermeier, R., Mittermeier, C., Da Fonseca, G., & Kent, J. (2000). Biodiversity hotspots for conservation priorities. Nature, 403, 853-858. https://doi.org/10.1038/35002501 [Link]

Oelmann, Y., Potvin, C., Mark, T., Werther, L., Tapernon, S., & Wilcke. W. (2010). Tree mixture effects on aboveground nutrient pools of trees in an experimental plantation in Panama. Plant and Soil, 326(1), 199-212. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-009-9997-x [Link]

Paoli, G., & Curran, L. (2007). Soil nutrients limit fine litter production and tree growth in mature lowland forest of southwestern Borneo. Ecosystems, 10, 503-518 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-007-9042-y [Link]

Posada, J., & Schuur, E. (2011). Relationships among precipitation regime, nutrient availability, and carbon turnover in tropical rain forests. Oecologia, 165,783-795. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-010-1881-0 [Link]

Poveda, G., & Mesa O. (2000). On the existence of Lloró (the rainiest locality on Earth): enhanced ocean-land-atmosphere interaction by a low level jet. Geophysical Research Letters, 27(11), 1675-1678. https://doi.org/10.1029/1999GL006091 [Link]

Poveda, I., Rojas, C., Rudas, A., & Rangel, O. (2004). El Chocó biogeográfico: ambiente físico. En O. Rangel (Ed.). 2004. Colombia diversidad biótica IV. El Chocó biogeográfico/costa pacífica. Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Quesada, R., Acosta, L., Garro, M., & Castillo, M. (2012). Dinámica del crecimiento del bosque húmedo tropical, 19 años después de la cosecha bajo cuatro sistemas de aprovechamiento forestal en la Península de Osa, Costa Rica. Revista Tecnología en Marcha, 25(5), 56-66. https://doi.org/10.18845/tm.v25i5.474 [Link]

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. (2011). Dinámica de la biomasa aérea en un bosque pluvial tropical del Chocó Biogeográfico. Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, 64(1), 5917-5936. https://repositorio.unal.edu.co/handle/unal/38557 [Link]

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. (2014). Diversidad florística arbórea y su relación con el suelo en un bosque pluvial tropical del Chocó biogeográfico. Revista Árvore, 38(6), 1123-1132. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0100-67622014000600017 [Link]

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno-Hurtado, F. (2016). Precipitation effects on soil characteristics in tropical rain forests of the Chocó biogeographical region. Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, 69(1), 7813-7823. http://dx.doi.org/10.15446/rfna.v69n1.54749 [Link]

Quinto-Mosquera, H., & Moreno, F. (2017a). Net primary productivity and edaphic fertility in two pluvial tropical forests in the Chocó biogeographical region of Colombia. PLoS ONE, 12(1), e0168211. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0168211 [Link]

Quinto-Mosquera, H., Rivas-Urrutia, Y., & Moreno-Hurtado F. (2017b). Efectos de la fertilización del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques pluviales tropicales del Chocó, Colombia. Revista de Biología Tropical, 65(3), 1161-1173. http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v65i3.29442 [Link]

Quinto-Mosquera, H., Hurtado, D., & Arboleda, J. (2019). Influencia de las condiciones edaficas sobre la dominancia y diversidad de arboles en bosques pluviales tropicales del Chocó biogeografico. Revista de Biología Tropical, 67(6), 1278-1291. http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v67i6.37517 [Link]

R Development Core Team. (2012). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing. http://www.R-project.org/ [Link]

Restrepo, H., Orrego, S., Salazar-Uribe, J., Bullock, B., & Montes, C. (2019). using biophysical variables and stand density to estimate growth and yield of Pinus patula in Antioquia, Colombia. Open Journal of Forestry, 9, 195-213. https://doi.org/10.4236/ojf.2019.93010 [Link]

Reed, S. C., Townsend, A. R., Taylor, P. G., & Cleveland C. C. (2011). Phosphorus cycling in tropical forests growing on highly weathered soils. En E. Bünemann, A. Oberson, & E. Frossard (Eds.) Phosphorus in Action (pp. 339-369). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15271-9_14 [Link]

Rüger, N., Berger, U., Hubbell, S., Vieilledent, G., & Condit R. (2011). Growth strategies of tropical tree species: Disentangling light and size effects. PLoS ONE, 6(9): e25330. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0025330 [Link]

Russo, S., Davies, S., King, D., & Tan, S. (2005). Soil-related performance variation and distributions of tree species in a Bornean rain forest. Journal of Ecology, 93(5), 879-889. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2005.01030.x [Link]

Salisbury, F., & Ross, C. (1994). Fisiología vegetal (4ta ed.). Grupo Editorial Iberoamérica S.A. de C.V.

Santiago, L., Schuur, E., & Silvera, K. (2005). Nutrient cycling and plant-soil feedbacks along a precipitation gradient in lowland Panama. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 21(4), 461-470. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467405002464 [Link]

Sayer, E., Wright, J., Tanner, E., Yavitt, J., Harms, K., Powers, J., Kaspari, M., García, M., & Turner, B. (2012). Variable responses of lowland tropical forest nutrient status to fertilization and litter manipulation. Ecosystems, 15(3), 387-400. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-011-9516-9 [Link]

Schlesinger, W. (1997). Biogeochemistry: An analysis of global change. Academic Press.

Soong, J., Janssens, I., Grau, O., Margalef, O., Stahl, C., van Langenhove, L., Urbina, I., Chave, J., Dourdain, A., Ferry, B., Freycon, V., Herault, B., Sardans, J., Peñuelas, J., & Verbruggen, E. (2020). Soil properties explain tree growth and mortality, but not biomass, across phosphorus-depleted tropical forests. Scientific Reports, 10, 2302. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-58913-8 [Link]

Statistical Graphics Corp. (2002). Statgraphics Plus Centurium XV, versión 19. https://www.statgraphics.com [Link]

Sullivan, B., Alvarez-Clare, S., Castle, S., Porder, S., Reed, S., Schreeg, L., Cleveland, C., & Townsend, A. (2014). Assessing nutrient limitation in complex forested ecosystems: alternatives to large-scale fertilization experiments. Ecology, 95(3), 668-681. https://doi.org/10.1890/13-0825.1 [Link]

Tanner E., Kapos, V., & Franco, W. (1992). Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization effects on Venezuelan montane forest trunk growth and litterfall. Ecology, 73(1), 78-86. https://doi.org/10.2307/1938722 [Link]

Toledo, M., Poorter, L., Peña-Claros, A., Alarcón, M., Balcázar, J., Leaño, C., Licona, J., Llanque, O., Vroomans, V., Zuidema P. , & Bongers, F. (2011). Climate is a stronger driver of tree and forest growth rates than soil and disturbance. Journal of Ecology, 99(1), 254-264. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2010.01741.x [Link]

Treseder, K., & Vitousek, P. (2001). Effects of soil nutrient availability on investment in acquisition of N and P in Hawaiian rain forests. Ecology, 82(4), 946-954. https://doi.org/10.1890/0012-9658(2001)082(0946:EOSNAO)2.0.CO;2 [Link]

Turner, I. M. (2001). The ecology of trees in the tropicals rain forest. Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511542206 [Link]

Vitousek, P., Porder, S., Houlton, B., & Chadwick, O. (2010). Terrestrial phosphorus limitation: Mechanisms, implications, and nitrogen-phosphorus interactions. Ecological Applications, 20(1), 5-15. https://doi.org/10.1890/08-0127.1 [Link]

Vitousek, P. (1984). Litterfall, nutrient cycling, and nutrient limitation in tropical forests. Ecology 65(1), 285-298. https://doi.org/10.2307/1939481 [Link]

Whitmore, T. (1998). An introduction to tropical rain forests (2da ed.). Oxford University Press.

Wright, J., Yavitt, J., Wurzburger, N., Turner, B., Tanner, E., Sayer, E., Santiago, L., Kaspari, M., Hedin, L., Harms, K., García, M., & Corre, M. (2011). Potassium, phosphorus, or nitrogen limit root allocation, tree growth, or litter production in a lowland tropical forest. Ecology, 92(8), 1616-1625. https://doi.org/10.1890/10-1558.1 [Link]

(2022). Influencia de los nutrientes del suelo sobre el crecimiento arbóreo en bosques del Pacífico colombiano. Colombia Forestal, 25(2), 30-44

Artículos más leídos del mismo autor/a