DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.2736

Publicado:

2003-11-30

Número:

Vol. 9 Núm. 1 (2004): Enero - Junio

Sección:

Ciencia, investigación, academia y desarrollo

Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos

Autores/as

  • José Antonio Sarta Fuentes Universidad Nacional de Colombia y Universidad Distrital
  • Juan Guillermo Bobadilla Rojas Universidad Nacional de Colombia

Palabras clave:

Campo magnético, diamagnético, paramagnético, ferromagnético, Tesla, Gauss, magneto-percepción, geomagnetismo, resonancia magnética nuclear, magneto-encefalografía. (es).

Referencias

Sarta J., Bobadilla J. Influencia de campos magnéticos en la progresión del ciclo celular de fibroblastos humanos en condiciones in-vitro. Bio- electromagnetismo, Universidad Distrital. Bogotá, Agosto 2003.

Sarta J., et al. Efecto genotóxico de los campos magnéticos estacionarios. Bioelectromagnetismo, Universidad Distrital., Bogotá, Diciembre 2001.

Sarta J. Valoración del impacto ambiental de los equipos de resonancia magnética nuclear en el DistritoCapital.Bioelectromagnetismo, Universidad Distrital., Bogotá, Diciembre 1999.

Sarta J., Bobadilla J. Influencia de campos electromagnéticos y magnéticos en sistemas Biológicos y posibles consecuencias en la salud humana. XI Congreso AEXMUN. Bogota, Septiembre 2003.

Bioxham J., Zatman S, Dumberry M. The origin of geomagnetic jerks. Nature 2002 Nov; 65-68.

Guyodo Y, Valet JP. Global changes in geomagnetic intensity during the past 800 thousand years. Nature 1999; 399: 249-252.

McElhinny M. W., Senanayake WE.. Variations in geomagnetic dipole in the last 50.000 years. J Geomag Geoelectr 1982; 34: 39-51.

Valet JP, Meynadier L. Geomagnetic field intensity and reversals during the past four million years. Nature 1993; 366: 234-238.

Hays JD. Faunal extinctions and reversals Earth's magnetic field. Geol Soc Am Bull 1971; 82: 2433-2447.

Farina, M., Lins de Barros, H. Esquivel, D.M.S.. Organismos magnetotácticos. Investigación y ciencia, 171: 70-78.

Dunin-Borkowski R, McCartney M, Frankel R, Bazylinski D, Pósfai M, Buseck P. Magnetic Microstructure of Magnetotactic Bacteria by Electron Holography. Science 1998 Dec 4; 282: 1868-1870

Wiltschko R, Wiltschko W. Magnetic orientation in animals. Springer Verlag, Berlin. Heidelberg, 1995.

Gould J, Kirschvink J., Deffeyes K. Bees have magnetic reanence. Science 1978; 201: 1026-1028.

Acosta - Avalos D, Wajnberg E., Oliveira P, Leal L, Farina M, Esquivel D. Isolation of magnetic nanoparticles from Pachycondyla marginata ants. J Exp Biol 1999; 202: 2687-2692.

Anderson J, Vander Meer R. Magnetic orientation in fire ant Solenopsis invicta. Naturwissenchaften 1995; 80: 568-570.

Walker N.N., et al. Nature, volumen 390, página 371-376, noviembre 1997.

Berry M.V., Geim A.K., Of flying frogs and levitrons. Eur. J. Phys. 18, 307-313, 1997.

Rinck P., Petersen S., Muller R., Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Biomedics. Stuttgart; New York: Thieme, 1985.

Curra A, Modugno N, Inghilleri M, Manfredi M, Hallett M, Berardelli A. Transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques in clinical investigation. Neurology 2002 Dec 24;59(12):1851-1859

Lubbe AS, Alexiou C, Bergemann C. Clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. J Surg Res 2001 Feb; 95 (2): 200-206.

Shellock F, Schaefer D., Gordon C. Effect of a 1.5 T static magnetic field on body temperature of man. Magn Reson Med 1986; 3: 644-647.

Lisanby SH., Update on magnetic seizure therapy: a novel form of convulsive therapy. J ECT 2002 Dec; 18 (4): 182-188.

Quiner S, Letmaier M, Barnas C, Heiden A, Kasper S. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--from diagnostic procedure to therapy] [Article inGerman]Wien Klin Wochenschr 2002 Mar 28;114(5-6):181186.

Lisanby SH, Belmaker RH. Animal models of the mechanisms of action of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS): comparisons with electroconvulsive shock (ECS). Depress Anxiety 2000; 12 (3): 178-187.

Koundakjian E. J., Bournias-Vardiabasis, N., Haggren, W., Adey, W. R., and Phillips, J. L.. Exposure of Drosophila melanogaster embryonic cell cultures to 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields: Expression of heat shock proteins 23 and 27. In Vitro Toxicology 1996; 3: 281-289.

Rapley B. I., Rowland R.E., Page W.H., Podd J. V.. Influence of extremely low frecuency magnetic fields on chromosomes and the mitotic cycle in Vicia faba L., the broad bean. Bioelectromagnetics 1998; 19 (3): 152-161.Med Rehabil 1986; 67: 746-749.

Weaver J, Vaughan T, Astumian D. Biological sensing of samll'field differences by magnetically sensitive chemical reactions. Nature 2000 June; 405: 707-709.

Schiffer I., Screiber W., Graf R., Screiber E., Jung D., Rose D., Hehn M., Gebhard S., Sagemüller J., Spiess H., Oesch F., Thelen M., Hengstler J.. No influence of magnetic fields on cell cycle progression using conditions relevant for patients during MRI. Bioelectroagnetics 2003; 24 (4): 241-250.

Villenueve PJ, Agnew DA, Johnson KC, Mao Y. Brain cancer and occupational exposure to magnetic fields among men: results from a Canadian population-based case-control study. Int J Epidemiol 2002 Feb; 31(1): 210-217.

Loscher W. Do cocarcinogenic effects of ELF electromagnetic fields require repeated long-term interaction with carcinogens? Characteristics of positive studies using the DMBA breast cancer model in rats. Bioelectromagnetics 2001 Dec; 22 (8): 603-614.

Li CY. Association between occupational exposure to power frequency electromagnetic fields and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a review. Am J Ind Med 2003 Feb; 43 (2): 212-220.

Benitez J., Bioelectromagnetismo y la contaminación de las ondas electromagnéticas en los seres humanos. Vol. I, Vol II., febrero 2003.

McCann J., et al. A critical review of the genotoxy potential of electric and magnetic fields. Mutation Research, Vol 297, pag 61-95., 1993.

McCann J., Kavet R., Rafferty C.N.. Assessing the potential carcinogenic activity of magnetic fields using animal models. Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Mar; 108 Suppl 179-200.

Karasek M., Lerchl A. Melatonin and magnetic fields. Neuroendocrinol Lett 2002 Apr; 23; Suppl 1: 84-87.

Liboff A.R., William T., Strong D.M., Wistar R. Time - varying magnetic fields: effects on DNA synthesis. Science 1984 Feb 24; 223 (4638): 818-820.

Harris PA, Lamb J, Heaton B, Wheatley DN. Possible attenuation of the G2 DNA damage cell cycle checkpoint in HeLa cells by extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields. Cancer Cell Int. 2002; 2(1): 3

Eremenko T., Exposito C., Pasquarelli E., Pasqualli E., Volpe V. Cell - cycle kinetics of Friend erythroleukemia cells in a magnetically shielded room and in a low - frecuency / low intensity magnetic field. Bioelectromagnetics 1997; 18 (1): 58-66.

Gartzke J, Lange K. Cellular target of weak magnetic fields: ionic conduction along actin filaments of microvilli. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2002 Nov; 283 (5): C1333-1346.

Carpenter D., Ayrapetyan S., Biological Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields Sources and Mechanisms. Vol I.,165-179. Academic Press.,1994.

Buemi M]., Marino D., Di Pasqualle G., Floccari F., Senatore M., Aloisi C., Grasso F., Mondio G., Perillo P., Frisina N., Corica F.. Call proliferation / cell death balance in renal cell cultures after to exposure to a static magnetic field. Nephron 2001 Mar; 87 (3): 269-273.

Fanelli C., Coppola S., Barone R., Colussi C., Gualandi G., Volpe P., Ghibelli L.. Magnetic fields increase cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis via modulation of Ca2+ influx. FASEB J 1999; 13: 95102.

Koana T., et al. Increase in the Mitotic Recombination frecuency in Drosophila melanogaster by Magnetic Fiel exposure and its suppression by vitamin E supplement. Mutation Research, 373, 5560,1997.

Vyalov A. Clinico - hygienic and experimental data of the effects of magnetic fields under industrial conditions. En: Kholodov Y., ed. Influence of magnetic fields on biological objects. Moscow: traducción de The Joint Publications Research Service; 1974; JJPRS 63038: 163-174.

Shivers R., Kavaliers M., Teskey G., Prato F., Pelletier R.M.. Magnetic resonance imaging temporarily alters blood - brain barrier permeability in the rat. Neurosci Lett 1987; 76: 25-31.

Gorczynska E., Wegrzynowiccz R. The effect of magnetic fields on platelets, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in guinea pigs. Physiological Chem and Med NMR 1983; 15; 459-468.

Schenk J. Health and physiological effects of hu exposure whole body 4 tesla magnetic fields during MRI. In : Magin R, Liburdy R, Persson B, eds. Biological effects and safety aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. New York: NY Academy of Sciences; 1991: 285-301.

Hong CZ, Harmon D, Yu J. Static magnetic field influence on rat tail nerve function. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1986; 67: 746-749.

Lovsund P, Nillson S, Reuter T., Oberg P. Magnetophosphenes: a quantitative analysis of thresholds. Med Biol Eng Comp 1980; 18: 326-334.

Redington R, Dumoulin C, Schenck J. MR imaging and bioeffects on a whole body 4.0 tesla imaging system. Book of abstracts. Volume 1. Berkeley, CA: Society of magnetic Resonance In Medicine; 1988: 4.

Marsh J, Armstrong T, Jacobson A, Smith R. Health effects of occupational exposure to steady magnetic fields. American Industrial Hyg Assoc J 1982 June; 43 (6): 387-394

Mezrich R, Reichek N, Kressel H. ECG Effects in high - field MR imaging. Radiology 1985; 157 (P): 219.

Rodegerts E. A., Groenewaller E. F., Kehlbach R., Roth P., Wiskirchen J., Gebert R., Claussen C. D., Duda S. H.. In vitro evaluation of teratogenic effects by time - varying MR gradient fields on fetal human fibroblasts. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2000 Jul; 12 (1): 150-156.

Nafziger J., Devevey L., Tricottet V, Guidlosson JJ, Averlant G, Arock M. Investigation of the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on purified human hematopoietic progenitors. Life Sci. 1997; G1 (19): 1935-46).

Reipert B.M., Allan D., Dexter T. M.. Exposure to extremely low frecuency magnetic fields has no effect on growth rate or clonogenic potential of multipotential haematopoietic progenitor cells. Growth Factors 1996 May; 13 (3-4): 205-217.

Raylmann R. R., Clavo A. C., Wahl R. L. Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro. Bioelectromagnetics 1996; 17 (5): 358-363.

Sakurai H, Okuno K, Kubo A, Nakarmura K, Shoda M,. Effects os a 7 Tesla homogeneous magnetic field on mammalian cells. Bioelectrochem - Bioenerg. 1999, Oct; 49 (1): 57-63.

Wolff S., et al., Tests for DNA and chromosomal damge induced by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imagen., Radiology, vol 136, 707-710, September, 1980.

Wiskirchen J., Groenewaeller E. F., Kehlbach R., Heinzelmann F., Wittau M., Rodemann H. P., Claussen C. D., Duda S. H.. Long term effects of repetitive expose topa static magnetic field (1.5 T) on proliferation of human fetal lung fibroblast. Magn. Res. Med. 1999 Mar; 41 (3): 464-468.

Cómo citar

APA

Sarta Fuentes, J. A., & Bobadilla Rojas, J. G. (2003). Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos. Ingeniería, 9(1), 13–16. https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.2736

ACM

[1]
Sarta Fuentes, J.A. y Bobadilla Rojas, J.G. 2003. Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos. Ingeniería. 9, 1 (nov. 2003), 13–16. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.2736.

ACS

(1)
Sarta Fuentes, J. A.; Bobadilla Rojas, J. G. Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos. Ing. 2003, 9, 13-16.

ABNT

SARTA FUENTES, J. A.; BOBADILLA ROJAS, J. G. Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos. Ingeniería, [S. l.], v. 9, n. 1, p. 13–16, 2003. DOI: 10.14483/23448393.2736. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/reving/article/view/2736. Acesso em: 18 may. 2021.

Chicago

Sarta Fuentes, José Antonio, y Juan Guillermo Bobadilla Rojas. 2003. «Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos». Ingeniería 9 (1):13-16. https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.2736.

Harvard

Sarta Fuentes, J. A. y Bobadilla Rojas, J. G. (2003) «Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos», Ingeniería, 9(1), pp. 13–16. doi: 10.14483/23448393.2736.

IEEE

[1]
J. A. Sarta Fuentes y J. G. Bobadilla Rojas, «Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos», Ing., vol. 9, n.º 1, pp. 13–16, nov. 2003.

MLA

Sarta Fuentes, J. A., y J. G. Bobadilla Rojas. «Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos». Ingeniería, vol. 9, n.º 1, noviembre de 2003, pp. 13-16, doi:10.14483/23448393.2736.

Turabian

Sarta Fuentes, José Antonio, y Juan Guillermo Bobadilla Rojas. «Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos». Ingeniería 9, no. 1 (noviembre 30, 2003): 13–16. Accedido mayo 18, 2021. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/reving/article/view/2736.

Vancouver

1.
Sarta Fuentes JA, Bobadilla Rojas JG. Campos magnéticos y sus efectos biológicos. Ing. [Internet]. 30 de noviembre de 2003 [citado 18 de mayo de 2021];9(1):13-6. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/reving/article/view/2736

Descargar cita

Visitas

3810

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.

Ingeniería, 2004-00-00 vol:9 nro:1 pág:13-16

Campos Magnéticos y sus efectos Biológicos

José Antonio Sarta Fuentes
Miembro Grupo de Investigación de Bioingeniería, U. Distrital Francisco José de Caldas
Juan Guillermo Bobadilla Rojas
Instituto de Biotecnología, U. Nacional de Colombia.

Resumen

El siguiente trabajo presenta una revisión de las investigaciones realizadas del efecto de los campos magnéticos en sistemas biológicos, con el fin de establecer el estado del arte en esta clase de investigaciones.

Palabras Clave:
Campo magnético, diamagnético, paramagnético, ferromagnético, Tesla, Gauss, magneto-percepción, geomagnetismo, resonancia magnética nuclear, magneto-encefalografía.

Abstract

This paper shows a revision about researches related to the effects of the magnet fields on biological systems in order to establish the state of the art in this kind of investigations.

Key words:
Magnetic field, diamagnetic, paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, Tesla, Gauss, magnetoperception, geomagnetism, nuclear magnetic resonance, magneto-encephalography.


INTRODUCCIÓN

En la formulación de las propuestas de investigación elaboradas al interior del Grupo de Investigación de Bioingeniería de la Universidad Distrital, relacionadas con el estudio de la influencia de los campos magnéticos CM en los seres vivos, se ha realizado una revisión minuciosa del estado del arte en relación a este tema [1,2,3,].

Una descripción del estado actual de la investigación adelantada por el Grupo de Bioingeniería fue presentada en el XI Congreso Nacional de Medicina AEXMUN realizado en septiembre de 2003 [4].

I. CAMPO MAGNÉTICO Y LOS SISTEMAS VIVOS

El planeta Tierra tiene un campo magnético de 0.5 Gauss (G), campo que es permanente en la Tierra pero que no es estático, comprobado a partir de estudios en sedimentos oceánicos distribuidos por todo el planeta en los cuales se revela una alternancia de períodos de alta y baja intensidad [5 ]. Se comprobó que hace 780.000 años hubo una fuerte caída de intensidad del campo magnético, inversión llamada Brunhes - Matuyama [6], y que revela que el sur magnético se correspondía con el sur geográfico, diferente a como lo es ahora, donde el sur magnético se encuentra en el norte geográfico [7]. En otros estudios se ha comprobado que la intensidad del campo bipolar cambia siguiendo un patrón de inversión en el cual decrece lentamente la intensidad magnética seguida de un aumento brusco en solamente unos miles de años y modificando la polaridad magnética terrestre [8].

En el momento de suceder los cambios en la polaridad e intensidad magnética del planeta, se correlaciona la extinción de grandes familias de radiolarios, protozoos que habitan en el sedimento de los océanos, y los cuales solo se tiene como variable de extinción la variación del campo magnético terrestre [9]. Además hay bacterias magnéticas y algunos organismos celulares que contienen partículas magnéticas suficientes para orientar a estos seres sobre las líneas del campo geomagnético [10], [11]. Las abejas, moscas, mariposas, tortugas, tiburones, salmones, atunes, ballenas, delfines y palomas, entre otras especies animales, se han detectado formas de orientación basados en las líneas geomagnéticas del planeta [12]. Ejemplo de ello es la abeja Apis mellifera, quien posee magnetita en su abdomen que dadas las propiedades ferromagnéticas permite explicar su magnetopercepción [13], caso similar es el de la hormiga Pachycondyla marginata en la que se ha confirmado la presencia de material magnético en su cuerpo [14] y el de la Solepnopsis invicta en el que se observó una sensibilidad magnética relacionada con la búsqueda de comida [15]. En algunos vertebrados se ha determinado que pueden orientarse en largos viajes empleando las líneas del campo magnético terrestre debido a la presencia de células magnetoreceptoras ubicadas en la nariz [16].

Manifestaciones de efectos diamagnéticos en sistemas biológicos se presentan en la aparente levitación de tales sistemas [17].

En los humanos también se aprovechan las cualidades magnéticas de los átomos de hidrógeno, que constituyen casi dos tercios del cuerpo humano. Al momento de colocarse un paciente en un solenoide que suministra un intenso campo magnético (alrededor de 1.5 Tesla), los protones en diferentes partes del cuerpo realizan el llamado proceso de precesión a diferentes frecuencias, que son censadas y procesadas por el resonador magnético para así dar información sobre la posición de los protones y ofrecer una imagen final de utilidad médica [18].

Otra aplicación de los campos magnéticos en humanos es la estimulación magnética transcraneal, herramienta utilizada para activar áreas motoras corticales y del tracto corticoespinal sin causar incomodidades para el paciente, ofreciendo aplicaciones para la evaluación de los tiempos de conducción de neuronas motoras centrales, del umbral y de la amplitud de potenciales evocados del sistema nervioso central [19].

Se adelantan además, investigaciones en donde se marcan magnéticamente fármacos que se quieren dirigir a sitios específicos, como en el caso del tratamiento local antitumoral, basados en la unión de ferrofluídos a fármacos que rodean al blanco farmacéutico, controlando así los procesos farmacocinéticas y aumentando su eficacia final terapéutica [20].

Una técnica de uso principalmente en neurofisiología, es la magneto-encefalografía, la cual permite captar los campos magnéticos que se generan en las dendritas cuando presentan algún tipo de actividad eléctrica. Permite analizar la función del cerebro con una relación espacial de milímetros y una resolución temporal de milisegundos, datos que permiten tener un mapa funcional del cerebro de una forma asombrosa, y siendo útil en casos combinados en estudios cerebrales por electroencefalogramas y resonancias magnéticas, con el fin de descubrir la manera de extensión de la actividad epileptiforme del cerebro, proporcionando detalladas zonas disparadas y mostrando los caminos propagados [21].

La terapia de choque magnético, paralela a la terapia electroconvulsiva, tiene una nueva puerta en la medicina al ofrecer una influencia eléctrica cerebral muy localizada en la terapéutica de pacientes con síndromes convulsivos [22]. En comparaciones realizadas con la terapia electroconvulsiva, la terapia de choque magnético tiene mayor control sobre el sitio y la extensión del área epileptiforme localizadas [23], [24].

II. INFLUENCIA DEL CAMPO MAGNÉTICO EN LOS SERES VIVOS.

Existe un considerable número de publicaciones que refieren la influencia de campos magnéticos en sistemas biológicos y en diferentes células humanas en condiciones in - vitro. Varias especies animales responden a las variaciones de campos magnéticos, hasta encontrarse en el modelo biológico de la Drosophila melanogaster alteraciones cromosómicas luego de ser sometidos los embriones a campos magnéticos de alta intensidad[25], al igual que sucede en la Vicia faba [26].

Se ha demostrado que los diversos mecanismos que permiten el intercambio de información de un estado magnético definido en moléculas biológicas reconocen las pequeñas diferencias de campos magnéticos en múltiples reacciones químicas [27] . Esta característica de sensibilidad molecular, al parecer, interfiere con diversos mecanismos homeostáticos celulares a este nivel originando alteraciones en las respuestas celulares habituales consideradas dentro de un margen de normalidad.

En diferentes campos de investigación se llevan a cabo labores para determinar los mecanismos de acción de los campos eléctricos, magnéticos y electromagnéticos sobre diferentes sistemas biológicos [28]. En el hombre se han encontrado relacionados los campos electromagnéticos con diferentes patologías del sistema nervioso central, como la esclerosis lateral amiotrófica y diferentes cánceres que afectan al SNC [29], [30], [31]. Varios estudios epidemiológicos relacionan tumores de diferentes regiones del cuerpo con la exposición a campos magnéticos y electromagnéticos [32], [33], [34]. En un estudio realizado en la Universidad de Lodz, Polonia, analizan el posible efecto carcinogénico de la exposición a campos magnéticos y electromagnéticos y lo correlacionan con la disminución de las concentraciones de melatonina observadas en diferentes investigaciones [35]. Pero a pesar de ello, la explicación biofísica de los efectos en la salud humana no se ha determinado.

Además, un evento determinante que se logró identificar en fibroblastos humanos es el aumento de la síntesis de DNA bajo la exposición de campos magnéticos de baja intensidad y frecuencia en condiciones in-vitro [36]. En una línea celular específica se logró detectar anormalidades en la duración de la fase G2 del ciclo celular expuestos a campos electromagnéticos [37] y diferentes variaciones en la cinética del ciclo celular en células eucariotas [ 38].

En funciones celulares específicas se han observado alteraciones en la conducción iónica de calcio a través de los filamentos de actina de las microvellosidades en células [39], [40], al igual que un aumento en el balance de proliferación / muerte celular en células renales in vitro [41]. La inducción de cambios en segundos mensajeros lipídicos, la inhibición de la apoptosis por la vía del calcio y el aumento de la vida media de células in-vitro, la progresión y el retardo de diferentes fases del ciclo celular [42], en la Drosophila, además de identificarse el inicio de expresión a nivel genético de las proteínas de choque térmico hsp 23 y 27, revelan que los procesos celulares fisiológicos a nivel molecular son alterados y que al sumarse en conjunto derivan cambios visibles en el comportamiento orgánico y sistémico [25], y se observa también un incremento en la recombinación mitótica en campos magnéticos de 5 T [43].

Quizás uno de los más importantes hallazgos relacionados con la exposición de campos magnéticos estáticos y su efecto en la salud humana es en el que se estudian trabajadores expuestos a campos magnéticos de más de 0.35 T. El dolor de cabeza, la fatiga, el dolor retroesternal, pérdida del apetito, vértigo, insomnio y otros síntomas están relacionados con la exposición a estos campos [44].

Como posibles efectos en funciones fisiológicas específicas, en lo referente a funciones celulares de barrera, se hallaron alteraciones en la permeabilidad de la barrera hematoencefálica de ratas expuestas durante 23 minutos a 0.15 T y a campos de menos de 0.5 T [45]. En conejos, la trombolisis es acelerada asociada con campos de 0.35 T, resultados similares a los encontrados en cerdos de Guinea bajo un campo magnético de 50 G y mayores de 3000 G [46].

En pacientes que han sido expuestos a campos magnéticos de más de 4.0 T refieren haber tenido náuseas, vértigo y sabor metálico [47]. Estos hallazgos sugieren que puede hallarse una relación con la función nerviosa como resultado de la interacción con un campo magnético de alta intensidad. En la función neurológica del tallo cerebral en ratas se encontró aumentada la excitabilidad luego de ser expuesta a campos mayores de 0.5 T [48]. Aunque la etiología precisa de los fosfenos relacionados con campos magnéticos de alta intensidad no se han determinado, parece ser que es resultado de la excitación directa del nervio óptico y la retina por inducción de corrientes y de potenciales de acción o que de forma alternativa inducen un movimiento rápido de los ojos y de la cabeza [49]. Los magnetofosfenos han sido relacionados con densidades de corriente aproximadas a los 17 mA/cm2, y a campos magnéticos mayores de 2 T, y en experimentos realizados en voluntarios en donde se reportan magnetofosfenos a intensidades de 4 T [50].

Los efectos cardiovasculares también se han relacionado con la exposición a campos magnéticos estáticos. Una investigación reportó que hay pequeños incrementos en la presión arterial durante y posterior a una exposición magnética estática y que luego de haber un campo magnético estático de alta intensidad se registraron leves niveles de leucopenia [51]. En el electrocardiograma no se han asociado alteraciones excepto el incremento en la onda T, que es directamente relacionado con la intensidad el campo magnético estático menor de 0.1 T. Como la amplitud de la onda T es indicativa de infarto de miocardio, es contemplado el monitoreo electrocardiográfico antes y después de realizarse un procedimiento de resonancia magnética [52].

Pero así como se han hallado importantes variaciones en el comportamiento fisiológico basal de diferentes organismos, en muchas investigaciones relacionadas con el tema central de esta revisión, no se han encontrado ningún tipo de variación en su fisiología celular o molecular. Tal es el caso de investigaciones realizadas con el fin de evaluar efectos teratogénicos in - vitro con campos magnéticos variables en fibroblastos humanos [53], en la evaluación de células precursoras del linaje hematopoiético[54], [55], en células tumorales de ovario, piel y líneas de leucemia [56], en líneas celulares humanas de leucemia y fibroblastos a 7 Testa [57], no hubo cambios en líneas celulares cancerígenas humanas sometidas en condiciones establecidas y estandarizadas para resonancia magnética nuclear (1.5 T y 7.05 T) [28], ni daños cromosomáticos en células de ovarios de hamster sometidas a campos magnéticos en resonadores magnéticos [58], en fibroblastos fetales humanos, en los cuales no se observaron cambios en su proliferación bajo un campo magnético de 1.5 T [59], entre otras investigaciones.

III. CONCLUSIONES

Además de establecer mecanismos generales de interacción considerando la naturaleza diamagnética, paramagnética y ferromagnética de los sistemas biológicos, conclusiones definitivas no se puede establecer dada la diversidad de resultados positivos y negativos encontrados debido a las diferentes condiciones de exposición y controles experimentales que se plantean en las distintas investigaciones. Lo que se puede afirmar es que a la fecha no se ha establecido el mecanismo de acción por el cual se logra una interferencia en los procesos biológicos de diferentes seres vivos sometidos a campos magnéticos, y que por ahora, los resultados sobre sus efectos en este momento no son concluyentes.

REFERENCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS

[1] Sarta J., Bobadilla J. Influencia de campos magnéticos en la progresión del ciclo celular de fibroblastos humanos en condiciones in-vitro. Bio- electromagnetismo, Universidad Distrital. Bogotá, Agosto 2003.

[2] Sarta J., et al. Efecto genotóxico de los campos magnéticos estacionarios. Bioelectromagnetismo, Universidad Distrital., Bogotá, Diciembre 2001.

[3] Sarta J. Valoración del impacto ambiental de los equipos de resonancia magnética nuclear en el DistritoCapital.Bioelectromagnetismo, Universidad Distrital., Bogotá, Diciembre 1999.

[4] Sarta J., Bobadilla J. Influencia de campos electromagnéticos y magnéticos en sistemas Biológicos y posibles consecuencias en la salud humana. XI Congreso AEXMUN. Bogota, Septiembre 2003.

[5] Bioxham J., Zatman S, Dumberry M. The origin of geomagnetic jerks. Nature 2002 Nov; 65-68.

[6] Guyodo Y, Valet JP. Global changes in geomagnetic intensity during the past 800 thousand years. Nature 1999; 399: 249-252.

[7] McElhinny M. W., Senanayake WE. . Variations in geomagnetic dipole in the last 50.000 years. J Geomag Geoelectr 1982; 34: 39-51.

[8] Valet JP, Meynadier L. Geomagnetic field intensity and reversals during the past four million years. Nature 1993; 366: 234-238.

[9] Hays JD. Faunal extinctions and reversals Earth's magnetic field. Geol Soc Am Bull 1971; 82: 2433-2447.

[10] Farina, M., Lins de Barros, H. Esquivel, D.M.S.. Organismos magnetotácticos. Investigación y ciencia, 171: 70-78.

[11] Dunin-Borkowski R, McCartney M, Frankel R, Bazylinski D, Pósfai M, Buseck P. Magnetic Microstructure of Magnetotactic Bacteria by Electron Holography. Science 1998 Dec 4; 282: 1868-1870

[12] Wiltschko R, Wiltschko W. Magnetic orientation in animals. Springer Verlag, Berlin. Heidelberg, 1995.

[13] Gould J, Kirschvink J., Deffeyes K. Bees have magnetic reanence. Science 1978; 201: 1026-1028.

[14] Acosta - Avalos D, Wajnberg E., Oliveira P, Leal L, Farina M, Esquivel D. Isolation of magnetic nanoparticles from Pachycondyla marginata ants. J Exp Biol 1999; 202: 2687-2692.

[15] Anderson J, Vander Meer R. Magnetic orientation in fire ant Solenopsis invicta. Naturwissenchaften 1995; 80: 568-570.

[16] Walker N.N., et al. Nature, volumen 390, página 371-376, noviembre 1997.

[17] Berry M.V., Geim A.K., Of flying frogs and levitrons. Eur. J. Phys. 18, 307-313, 1997.

[18] Rinck P., Petersen S., Muller R., Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Biomedics. Stuttgart; New York: Thieme, 1985.

[19] Curra A, Modugno N, Inghilleri M, Manfredi M, Hallett M, Berardelli A. Transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques in clinical investigation. Neurology 2002 Dec 24;59(12):1851-1859

[20] Lubbe AS, Alexiou C, Bergemann C. Clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. J Surg Res 2001 Feb; 95 (2): 200-206.

[21] Shellock F, Schaefer D., Gordon C. Effect of a 1.5 T static magnetic field on body temperature of man. Magn Reson Med 1986; 3: 644-647.

[22] Lisanby SH., Update on magnetic seizure therapy: a novel form of convulsive therapy. J ECT 2002 Dec; 18 (4): 182-188.

[23] Quiner S, Letmaier M, Barnas C, Heiden A, Kasper S. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--from diagnostic procedure to therapy] [Article inGerman]Wien Klin Wochenschr 2002 Mar 28;114(5-6):181- 186.

[24] Lisanby SH, Belmaker RH. Animal models of the mechanisms of action of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS): comparisons with electroconvulsive shock (ECS). Depress Anxiety 2000; 12 (3): 178-187.

[25] Koundakjian E. J., Bournias-Vardiabasis, N., Haggren, W., Adey, W. R., and Phillips, J. L.. Exposure of Drosophila melanogaster embryonic cell cultures to 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields: Expression of heat shock proteins 23 and 27. In Vitro Toxicology 1996; 3: 281-289.

[26] Rapley B. I., Rowland R.E., Page W.H., Podd J. V.. Influence of extremely low frecuency magnetic fields on chromosomes and the mitotic cycle in Vicia faba L., the broad bean. Bioelectromagnetics 1998; 19 (3): 152-161.Med Rehabil 1986; 67: 746-749.

[27] Weaver J, Vaughan T, Astumian D. Biological sensing of samll'field differences by magnetically sensitive chemical reactions. Nature 2000 June; 405: 707-709.

[28] Schiffer I., Screiber W., Graf R., Screiber E., Jung D., Rose D., Hehn M., Gebhard S., Sagemüller J., Spiess H., Oesch F., Thelen M., Hengstler J.. No influence of magnetic fields on cell cycle progression using conditions relevant for patients during MRI. Bioelectroagnetics 2003; 24 (4): 241-250.

[29] Villenueve PJ, Agnew DA, Johnson KC, Mao Y. Brain cancer and occupational exposure to magnetic fields among men: results from a Canadian population-based case-control study. Int J Epidemiol 2002 Feb; 31(1): 210-217.

[30] Loscher W. Do cocarcinogenic effects of ELF electromagnetic fields require repeated long-term interaction with carcinogens? Characteristics of positive studies using the DMBA breast cancer model in rats. Bioelectromagnetics 2001 Dec; 22 (8): 603-614.

[31] Li CY. Association between occupational exposure to power frequency electromagnetic fields and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a review. Am J Ind Med 2003 Feb; 43 (2): 212-220.

[32] Benitez J., Bioelectromagnetismo y la contaminación de las ondas electromagnéticas en los seres humanos. Vol. I, Vol II., febrero 2003.

[33] McCann J., et al. A critical review of the genotoxy potential of electric and magnetic fields. Mutation Research, Vol 297, pag 61-95., 1993.

[34] McCann J., Kavet R., Rafferty C.N.. Assessing the potential carcinogenic activity of magnetic fields using animal models. Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Mar; 108 Suppl 179-200.

[35] Karasek M., Lerchl A. Melatonin and magnetic fields. Neuroendocrinol Lett 2002 Apr; 23; Suppl 1: 84-87.

[36] Liboff A.R., William T., Strong D.M., Wistar R. Time - varying magnetic fields: effects on DNA synthesis. Science 1984 Feb 24; 223 (4638): 818-820.

[37] Harris PA, Lamb J, Heaton B, Wheatley DN. Possible attenuation of the G2 DNA damage cell cycle checkpoint in HeLa cells by extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields. Cancer Cell Int. 2002; 2(1): 3

[38] Eremenko T., Exposito C., Pasquarelli E., Pasqualli E., Volpe V. Cell - cycle kinetics of Friend erythroleukemia cells in a magnetically shielded room and in a low - frecuency / low intensity magnetic field. Bioelectromagnetics 1997; 18 (1): 58-66.

[39] Gartzke J, Lange K. Cellular target of weak magnetic fields: ionic conduction along actin filaments of microvilli. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2002 Nov; 283 (5): C1333-1346.

[40] Carpenter D., Ayrapetyan S., Biological Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields Sources and Mechanisms. Vol I.,165-179. Academic Press.,1994.

[41 Buemi M]., Marino D., Di Pasqualle G., Floccari F., Senatore M., Aloisi C., Grasso F., Mondio G., Perillo P., Frisina N., Corica F.. Call proliferation / cell death balance in renal cell cultures after to exposure to a static magnetic field. Nephron 2001 Mar; 87 (3): 269-273.

[42] Fanelli C., Coppola S., Barone R., Colussi C., Gualandi G., Volpe P., Ghibelli L.. Magnetic fields increase cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis via modulation of Ca2+ influx. FASEB J 1999; 13: 95- 102.

[43] Koana T., et al. Increase in the Mitotic Recombination frecuency in Drosophila melanogaster by Magnetic Fiel exposure and its suppression by vitamin E supplement. Mutation Research, 373, 55- 60,1997.

[44] Vyalov A. Clinico - hygienic and experimental data of the effects of magnetic fields under industrial conditions. En: Kholodov Y., ed. Influence of magnetic fields on biological objects. Moscow: traducción de The Joint Publications Research Service; 1974; JJPRS - 63038: 163-174.

[45] Shivers R., Kavaliers M., Teskey G., Prato F., Pelletier R.M.. Magnetic resonance imaging temporarily alters blood - brain barrier permeability in the rat. Neurosci Lett 1987; 76: 25-31.

[46] Gorczynska E., Wegrzynowiccz R. The effect of magnetic fields on platelets, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in guinea pigs. Physiological Chem and Med NMR 1983; 15; 459-468.

[47] Schenk J. Health and physiological effects of hu exposure whole body 4 tesla magnetic fields during MRI. In : Magin R, Liburdy R, Persson B, eds. Biological effects and safety aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. New York: NY Academy of Sciences; 1991: 285-301.

[48] Hong CZ, Harmon D, Yu J. Static magnetic field influence on rat tail nerve function. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1986; 67: 746-749.

[49] Lovsund P, Nillson S, Reuter T., Oberg P. Magnetophosphenes: a quantitative analysis of thresholds. Med Biol Eng Comp 1980; 18: 326-334.

[50] Redington R, Dumoulin C, Schenck J. MR imaging and bioeffects on a whole body 4.0 tesla imaging system. Book of abstracts. Volume 1. Berkeley, CA: Society of magnetic Resonance In Medicine; 1988: 4.

[51] Marsh J, Armstrong T, Jacobson A, Smith R. Health effects of occupational exposure to steady magnetic fields. American Industrial Hyg Assoc J 1982 June; 43 (6): 387-394

[52] Mezrich R, Reichek N, Kressel H. ECG Effects in high - field MR imaging. Radiology 1985; 157 (P): 219.

[53] Rodegerts E. A., Groenewaller E. F., Kehlbach R., Roth P., Wiskirchen J., Gebert R., Claussen C. D., Duda S. H.. In vitro evaluation of teratogenic effects by time - varying MR gradient fields on fetal human fibroblasts. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2000 Jul; 12 (1): 150-156.

[54] Nafziger J., Devevey L., Tricottet V, Guidlosson JJ, Averlant G, Arock M. Investigation of the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on purified human hematopoietic progenitors. Life Sci. 1997; G1 (19): 1935-46).

[55] Reipert B.M., Allan D., Dexter T. M.. Exposure to extremely low frecuency magnetic fields has no effect on growth rate or clonogenic potential of multipotential haematopoietic progenitor cells. Growth - Factors 1996 May; 13 (3-4): 205-217.

[56] Raylmann R. R., Clavo A. C., Wahl R. L. Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro. Bioelectromagnetics 1996; 17 (5): 358-363.

[57] Sakurai H, Okuno K, Kubo A, Nakarmura K, Shoda M,. Effects os a 7 Tesla homogeneous magnetic field on mammalian cells. Bioelectrochem - Bioenerg. 1999, Oct; 49 (1): 57-63.

[58] Wolff S., et al., Tests for DNA and chromosomal damge induced by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imagen., Radiology, vol 136, 707-710, September, 1980.

[59] Wiskirchen J., Groenewaeller E. F., Kehlbach R., Heinzelmann F., Wittau M., Rodemann H. P., Claussen C. D., Duda S. H.. Long - term effects of repetitive expose topa static magnetic field (1.5 T) on proliferation of human fetal lung fibroblast. Magn. Res. Med. 1999 Mar; 41 (3): 464-468.

José Antonio Sarta Fuentes.
Físico U. Nacional de Colombia. Investigador Asociado Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Distrital.

Juan Guillermo Bobadilla Rojas.
Médico Cirujano, Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.


Creation date: