Editorial

CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope

Authors

  • Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal

Keywords:

Editorial (es).

Keywords:

Editorial (en).

References

Bolaños Saenz, F., Florez, K., Gomez, T., Ramirez Acevedo, M., & Tello Suarez, S. (2018). Implementing a communitybased project in an EFL rural classroom. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 20(2), 264-274. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.13735

Bonilla Medina, X. (2012). Tefl educational principles: a proposal for changing times. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(2), 181-192. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.calj.2012.2.a11

Buendía, X. P. & Macías, D. F. (2019). The professional development of English language teachers in Colombia: A review of the literature. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 21(1), pp. 89-102.

Castañeda, A. (2012). EFL women-learners construction of the discourse of egalitarianism and knowledge in online-talkin-interaction. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(1), 163-179. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3827

Castillo, M. I. (2013). Narratives of place, belonging and language: an intercultural perspective. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 15(2), 312-314. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.calj.2013.2.a013

Clavijo, A. (2008). Editorial: Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal. V10: 2-3

Clavijo, A. (2015). Editorial: Research tendencies in the teaching of English as a foreign language. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 17(1), 3-7.

Comber, B. (2018). Community-based approaches to foreign language education. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 20(2), 151-153. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.13839

Ekiaka Nzai, V., Feng, Y.-L., & Reyna, C. (2014). Preparing Net Gen pre-service teachers for digital native classrooms. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 16(2), 185-200. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.calj.2014.2.a04

Freire, P., & Freire, A. M. A. (1998). Pedagogy of hope: reliving Pedagogy of the oppressed [New Ed.). New York: Continuum.

Korthagen, F. A. J. (2001). Linking practice and theory: the pedagogy of realistic teacher education. Mahwah, N.J.: L. Erlbaum Associates.

Hernández Castro, O., & Samacá Bohórquez, Y. (2006). A Study of EFL students’ interpretations of cultural aspects in foreign language learning. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, (8), 38-52. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.171

Montenegro, A. (2012). Analyzing EFL university learners’ positionings and participation structures in a collaborative learning environment. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(1), 127-145. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3825

Ortiz Medina, J. M. (2017). Shaping your identity as a speaker of English: the struggles of a beginner language learner. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 19(2), 250-262. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.10238

Pennycook, A. (2001). Critical Applied Linguistics. London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers LEA.

Quintero, L. M. (2008). Blogging: A way to foster EFL writing. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, (10), 7-49. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.96

Quintero, A.H. & Bonilla, S.X. (2020). Editorial: New editors, new challenge at the Colombian Applied Linguistics journal. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 21(2), 2-5. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.15526

Rincón, J., & Clavijo-Olarte, A. (2016). Fostering EFL learners’´ literacies through local inquiry in a multimodal experience. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 18(2), 67-82. https://doi.org/10.14483/calj.v18n2.10610

Rojas, M. X. (2012). Female EFL teachers: shifting and multiple gender and language-learner identities. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(1), 92-107. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3823

Wink, J. (2005). Critical pedagogy: Notes from the real world. New York, NY: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

How to Cite

APA

Journal, C. A. L. (2020). Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 22(1), 7–12. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.17045

ACM

[1]
Journal, C.A.L. 2020. Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal. 22, 1 (Oct. 2020), 7–12. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.17045.

ACS

(1)
Journal, C. A. L. Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope. Colomb. appl. linguist. j 2020, 22, 7-12.

ABNT

JOURNAL, C. A. L. Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, [S. l.], v. 22, n. 1, p. 7–12, 2020. DOI: 10.14483/22487085.17045. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/17045. Acesso em: 6 jul. 2022.

Chicago

Journal, Colombian Applied Linguistics. 2020. “Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 22 (1):7-12. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.17045.

Harvard

Journal, C. A. L. (2020) “Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope”, Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 22(1), pp. 7–12. doi: 10.14483/22487085.17045.

IEEE

[1]
C. A. L. Journal, “Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope”, Colomb. appl. linguist. j, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 7–12, Oct. 2020.

MLA

Journal, C. A. L. “Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, vol. 22, no. 1, Oct. 2020, pp. 7-12, doi:10.14483/22487085.17045.

Turabian

Journal, Colombian Applied Linguistics. “Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 22, no. 1 (October 31, 2020): 7–12. Accessed July 6, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/17045.

Vancouver

1.
Journal CAL. Editorial: CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope. Colomb. appl. linguist. j [Internet]. 2020Oct.31 [cited 2022Jul.6];22(1):7-12. Available from: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/17045

Download Citation

Visitas

140

Dimensions


PlumX


Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

CALJ in a trajectory of commitment to enlighten language teaching practices towards social transformation and hope

The Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal has been a space for encouraging language teacher researchers to share their experiences and illuminate others’ experience. In this trajectory, applied linguistics and English language teaching have been intertwined fields, where the integration of theoretical tools has allowed new comprehensions of one another. Authors of the journal have demonstrated this mutual exchange with the multiple outlooks and topics that they have proposed as part of their writings. As mentioned in the previous editorial (CALJ, Vol. 21, Nº 2, 2019), applied linguistics has been useful to determine not only a variety of practices of language teaching and learning, but also the implication of those in broader areas (Quintero & Bonilla, 2020, p. 2). In the same line of thought, the reflections that have emerged in the process of language teaching and learning have originated new inquiries in applied linguistics that have further contributed to both fields. In the commitment that the Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal has taken on, authors continue to explore areas that have a variety of characteristics.

The CALJ was created in 1998 in the Master’s Program in Applied Linguistics to TEFL at Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas with the initiative of publishing contributions from faculty and graduate students of the different ELT programs in Bogotá and Colombia. The areas addressed as well as the approaches of analysis reported in the articles have been myriad. Comprehending the task of teaching English in the classroom has been one of the most representative areas with a good number of articles attempting to show innovative methodologies, curriculum developments, assessment practices and many other attempts to make English teaching more effective. A second area of interest has involved reflective teaching, in which exploring pre-service, in-service and mentoring practices has been the focus for professional development. And a third area has been linguistics as such, which refer to articles examining manifold aspects of language from the theoretical outlooks of related disciplines such as psycholinguistics, pragmalinguistics, structural linguistics in order to enlighten the realm of language and literacy education, bilingualism, and multilingualism.

Through the dissemination of its volumes, the journal moved from having a local to a national circulation and this further opened its scope and contributions. This expansion came with a greater recognition of the journal for its important contribution to the field of English teaching in the country. Basically, the three main areas identified above tend to show a transition from rather instructional-based approaches to more holistic views of language teaching (Clavijo, 2015). They also show a prominent shared interest in pedagogical research to foster the understanding of theories with the aim to bridge the gap with practice (Korthagen, 2001). Therefore, this is an indicator to claim that the evolution of second language teaching theories has always been of concern to language academics and teachers in Colombia. The proposed perspective of the journal has expanded to a global audience of professionals in education, interested in researching issues in the field of applied linguistics and the teaching of languages, where this tendency of analysing the dichotomy of theory and practice continue to be strong.

However, imbued in the areas above, it has also been clear that from the origin of this journal, there have been central interests to its identity. Through publishing partial or final results of research, reflections on praxis, pedagogical innovations, book reviews and reviews on specialised themes; critical pedagogy and literacy as a social practice, for example, constitute the backbone of the journal thinking. These theoretical lens have opened up the opportunity to understand the world as a system of power relations that requires critical individuals (Freire, 1998; Wink, 2005; Pennycook, 2001). Besides, rescuing the voices of those who have been unheard, especially teachers, has also been crucial to provide a view of alternative practices and experiences (Clavijo, 2008). These aspects have been constituents of the journal to compile instances of relevant practices involved in the learning of another language. As a matter of fact, those contributions served as a source of inspiration to formulate three research lines in the M. A. in applied linguistics at Universidad Distrital: i) process of teacher education and development; ii) discourse studies within educational contexts and iii) Literacy studies and local pedagogies for social transformation.

As editors, we want to acknowledge this trajectory as well as to encourage writers to continue enlightening the field. The diverse topics and areas explored in the journal have made prominent the need to see the field from the viewpoint of critical applied linguistics and critical education so that through the intersection of aspects such as gender, ethnicity, culture, politics and ideology, new understandings of teaching a language and applied linguistics emerge. This is a path we consider essential to carry on providing a variety of opportunities to construct new meanings of language practice and language education. Having in mind that the current journal authors now exceed the local context and, therefore, that the CALJ community of authors and readers is now global, our call is to address research concerns from local but multidisciplinary and multidimensional perspectives in which the study of communication practices and language teaching advocates for the constitution of realities that require political agency and aspirations of change.

In tune with that invitation, the editors of this journal believe that teaching English is a social responsibility that is interweaved with broader areas of society. This is why the processes of teaching and learning a language and in turn our role as teachers and researchers gain strength when scrutinised as embedded in social, cultural, political and economic relationships of situated realities. In recent numbers, the journal has already provided significant examples of latent interests in the field that work in those interrelated areas. These examples emphasise language from that ideational perspective concerned with socially-sensitive practices, which genuinely approach specific local views. Some of them touch on issues such as positioning, identity configurations and subjectivity of teachers, learners and other actors in the frame of policies and institutional demands (e.g. Montenegro, 2012; Rojas, 2012; Ortiz-Medina, 2017). Others have undertaken community involvement in language curriculum and development (e.g. Rincón & Clavijo, 2016; Bolaños, Gomez, Florez, Ramirez & Tello, 2018; Comber, 2018); as well as new literacies in the connection of technology and society impacting language teacher education (e.g. Quintero, 2008, Castañeda, 2012; Ekiaka, Feng & Reyna, 2014). In the same vein, other studies have attempted to figure out social and intercultural relationships to grasp the complexities of language teaching (e.g. Hernández & Samacá, 2006; Bonilla, 2012; Castillo, 2013). Finally, we would like to point out other studies that have revisited long-standing concerns on methodology and professional development from a gaze that link language education and applied linguistics with society and culture in an attempt to provide new understandings of dominant discourses of language teaching and learning.

Those reports have been useful to understand plural identities and the continuous configuration of practices and voices that re-signify our role as teachers and our profession. In this number, Muñoz, Carvajal, Lopez & Avendaño underscore learning as a cornerstone to analyse language development with the purpose of providing light to stakeholders and envision renovated practices. Gomez & Walker coincide with Fajardo, Argudo & Abad to investigate views of Content integrated language learning to determine conditions that are necessary to particular situated context of Universities. Lopez-Andrada and Rodriguez & Vargas both attempt to understand the articulation between hypermedia and language learning devising it as an alternative to undertake innovative experiences to learners so that it could work in benefit of their process of language acquisition. Garzón & Posada, by using the lens of imagined communities make evident how learners’ identities are immersed in a fluid process that usually develops in plurality and choice. Furthermore, Bonilla & Samacá attempt to draw conclusions on how social factors such as age-generation can also mediate educational practices, specifically EFL mentoring at tertiary level.

In line with the studies presented here, we consider that continuing the exploration of language teaching in a social amalgam, that is, in a complexity of social values and beliefs, is a way to construct locally relevant knowledge attempting to change environments in which social injustice is perpetuated. As teachers and academics we “should not only have as a goal to create optimal conditions for desired learning…, but also to engage teachers in alternative pedagogical methods that are equity and justice focused” (Kohli et al, p. 9 ; 2015, Kumaravadivelu, 2003, p. 6 as cited in Buendía & Macias, 2019). Taking into account that Colombia, as well Latin America, are places where a search for social justice, equity and respect for diversity are an urgent need and, that language teaching and learning cannot be disconnected to that social reality, this can be an opportunity to share local thinking with the global academic community so that both (the local and global community) may contribute to enriching language and teaching practices for from a vantage point that goes rather beyond the practice of the language per se.

CALJ en una trayectoria de compromiso para iluminar las prácticas de enseñanza de idiomas hacia la transformación social y la esperanza

La revista académica Colombian Applied Linguistics ha sido un espacio para alentar a los docentes investigadores de idiomas a compartir sus experiencias e iluminar las de los demás. En esta trayectoria, la lingüística aplicada y la enseñanza del inglés han sido campos entrelazados, en los que la integración de herramientas teóricas ha permitido nuevas comprensiones entre sí. Los autores de la revista han demostrado este intercambio mutuo con las múltiples perspectivas y temas que han propuesto como parte de sus escritos. Como se mencionó en el editorial anterior (CALJ, Vol. 21, nro. 2, 2019), la lingüística aplicada ha sido útil para determinar, no solo una variedad de prácticas de enseñanza y aprendizaje de idiomas, sino también la implicación de éstas en áreas más amplias (Quintero y Bonilla, 2020, pág. 2). Siguiendo la misma línea de pensamiento, las reflexiones que han surgido en el proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje de idiomas han originado nuevas investigaciones en la lingüística aplicada, las cuales han contribuido aún más a ambos campos. En el compromiso que ha asumido la revista Colombian Applied Linguistics, los autores continúan explorando áreas que tienen una variedad de características.

La revista CALJ fue creada en 1998 en el Programa de Maestría en Lingüística Aplicada a la enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera (TEFL, por sus siglas en inglés) de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas con la iniciativa de publicar las contribuciones de docentes y estudiantes de posgrado de los diferentes programas de enseñanza del inglés (ELT) en Bogotá y Colombia. Las áreas abordadas, así como los enfoques de análisis reportados en los artículos, han sido innumerables. La comprensión de la tarea de enseñar inglés en el aula ha sido una de las áreas más representativas con un buen número de artículos que intentan mostrar metodologías innovadoras, desarrollos curriculares, prácticas de evaluación y muchos otros intentos de hacer más efectiva la enseñanza del inglés. Una segunda área de interés ha involucrado la enseñanza reflexiva, en la cual la exploración de las prácticas previas al servicio, durante el servicio y de tutoría ha sido el centro de atención para el desarrollo profesional. Y una tercera esfera ha sido la lingüística como tal, que se refiere a los artículos que examinan múltiples aspectos del idioma desde las perspectivas teóricas de disciplinas conexas como la psicolingüística, la pragmalingüística, la lingüística estructural, con el fin de iluminar el ámbito de la educación de lenguas y literacidad, el bilingüismo y el multilingüismo.

Por medio de la difusión de sus volúmenes, la revista pasó de tener una circulación local a una nacional, lo cual abrió aún más su alcance y contribuciones. Esta expansión vino acompañada de un mayor reconocimiento de ésta por su importante contribución al campo de la enseñanza de inglés en el país. Básicamente, las tres áreas principales identificadas anteriormente tienden a mostrar una transición desde enfoques más bien basados en la instrucción hacia visiones más holísticas de la enseñanza de idiomas (Clavijo, 2015). También muestran un destacado interés compartido en la investigación pedagógica para fomentar la comprensión de las teorías con el fin de llenar la brecha que se cree tener con la práctica (Korthagen, 2001). Por lo tanto, este es un indicador para afirmar que la evolución de las teorías de la enseñanza de un segundo idioma siempre ha sido motivo de preocupación para académicos y docentes de idiomas en Colombia. La perspectiva propuesta de la revista se ha ampliado a un público mundial de profesionales de la educación, cuyo interés es investigar cuestiones en el campo de la lingüística aplicada y la enseñanza de idiomas, en el que esta tendencia a analizar la dicotomía entre la teoría y la práctica sigue siendo preponderante.

Sin embargo, insertados en las áreas anteriores, también ha quedado claro que, desde el origen de esta revista, ha habido intereses centrales como parte de su identidad. A través de la publicación de resultados parciales o finales de investigación, reflexiones sobre la praxis, innovaciones pedagógicas, reseñas de libros y reseñas sobre temas especializados; la pedagogía crítica y la alfabetización como práctica social, por ejemplo, constituyen la columna vertebral del pensamiento de la revista.

Esas lentes teóricas han abierto la oportunidad de comprender el mundo como un sistema de relaciones de poder que requiere de individuos críticos (Freire, 1998; Wink, 2005; Pennycook, 2001). Además, el rescate de las voces de los que no han sido escuchados, especialmente los maestros, también ha sido crucial para proporcionar una visión de las prácticas y experiencias alternativas (Clavijo, 2008). Estos aspectos han sido componentes de la revista para recopilar ejemplos de prácticas pertinentes relacionadas con el aprendizaje de otro idioma. De hecho, esas contribuciones sirvieron como fuente de inspiración para formular tres líneas de investigación en la maestría en lingüística aplicada de la Universidad Distrital: a) proceso de formación y desarrollo de los docentes; b) estudios del discurso en contextos educativos y c) Estudios de la literacidad y pedagogías locales para la transformación social.

Como editores, queremos reconocer esta trayectoria y, así mismo, animar a los escritores a seguir iluminando el campo. Los diversos temas y áreas explorados en la revista han puesto en relieve la necesidad de ver el campo desde el punto de vista de la lingüística aplicada crítica y la pedagogía crítica para que, a través de la intersección de aspectos como el género, la etnia, la cultura, la política y la ideología, surjan nuevas comprensiones de la enseñanza de un idioma y de la lingüística aplicada. Este es un camino que consideramos esencial para seguir proporcionando una variedad de oportunidades con el fin de construir nuevos significados de la educación y la práctica de la lengua. Teniendo en cuenta que los actuales autores de la revista superan ahora el contexto local y, por lo tanto, que la comunidad de autores y lectores de CALJ es ahora global, nuestro llamado consiste en abordar las preocupaciones de investigación desde perspectivas locales pero multidisciplinarias y multidimensionales en las que el estudio de las prácticas de comunicación y la enseñanza de idiomas abogue por la constitución de realidades que requieren de la agencia política y aspiraciones al cambio.

En sintonía con esa invitación, los editores de esta revista tienen la creencia de que la enseñanza del inglés es una responsabilidad social que se entrelaza con áreas más amplias de la sociedad. Por ello, los procesos de enseñanza y aprendizaje de un idioma y, a su vez, nuestro papel como docentes e investigadores cobran fuerza cuando se examinan como parte integrante de las relaciones sociales, culturales, políticas y económicas de las realidades situadas. En números recientes, la revista ya ha proporcionado ejemplos significativos de intereses latentes en el campo que trabajan en esas áreas interrelacionadas. Estos ejemplos ponen de relieve el lenguaje desde esa perspectiva conceptual que se ocupa de las prácticas socialmente sensibles, las cuales se acercan genuinamente a puntos de vista locales específicos. Algunos de ellos se refieren a cuestiones como el posicionamiento, las configuraciones de identidad y la subjetividad de docentes, estudiantes y otros agentes en el marco de las políticas y las demandas institucionales (por ejemplo, Montenegro, 2012; Rojas, 2012; Ortiz-Medina, 2017). Otros han emprendido la participación de la comunidad en el desarrollo y los planes de estudio de idiomas (por ejemplo, Rincón y Clavijo, 2016; Bolaños, Gómez, Flórez, Ramírez y Tello, 2018; Comber, 2018); así como nuevas alfabetizaciones en relación con la tecnología y la sociedad que afectan a la formación de los docentes de idiomas (por ejemplo, Quintero, 2008; Castañeda, 2012; Ekiaka, Feng y Reyna, 2014). En el mismo sentido, otros estudios han tratado de determinar las relaciones sociales e interculturales para comprender las complejidades de la enseñanza de idiomas (por ejemplo, Hernández y Samacá, 2006; Bonilla, 2012; Castillo, 2013). Por último, quisiéramos señalar otros estudios que han vuelto a examinar preocupaciones de larga data sobre la metodología y el desarrollo profesional desde una mirada que vincula la enseñanza de idiomas y la lingüística aplicada con la sociedad y la cultura, en un intento por proporcionar nuevas comprensiones de los discursos dominantes sobre la enseñanza y el aprendizaje de idiomas.

Dichos reportes han sido útiles para comprender las identidades plurales y la continua configuración de prácticas y voces que resignifican nuestro papel como docentes y nuestra profesión. En este número, Muñoz, Carvajal, López y Avendaño destacan el aprendizaje como piedra angular para analizar el desarrollo del lenguaje con el propósito de dar luz a los interesados en el campo y vislumbrar prácticas renovadas. Gómez y Walker coinciden con Fajardo, Argudo y Abad para investigar los puntos de vista del aprendizaje de idiomas integrado en el contenido (CLIL) para determinar las condiciones que son necesarias para el contexto particular situado de las universidades. López-Andrada y Rodríguez & Vargas intentan comprender la articulación entre los hipermedios y el aprendizaje de idiomas ideándolos como alternativa para emprender experiencias innovadoras a los estudiantes de modo que puedan funcionar en beneficio de su proceso de adquisición del idioma. Garzón & Posada, al hacer uso de la lente de las comunidades imaginadas hacen evidente cómo las identidades de los estudiantes están inmersas en un proceso fluido que suele desarrollarse en la pluralidad y la elección. Además, Bonilla & Samacá intentan sacar conclusiones sobre cómo los factores sociales, tales como la generación en términos etarios, también pueden mediar en las prácticas educativas, específicamente los acompañamientos de tutoría de inglés como lengua extranjera (EFL) a nivel terciario.

En línea con los estudios presentados aquí, consideramos que continuar la exploración de la enseñanza de idiomas en una amalgama social, es decir, en una complejidad de valores y creencias sociales, es una forma de construir conocimiento localmente relevante que intenta cambiar los entornos en los que se perpetúa la injusticia social. Como docentes y académicos «no solo deberíamos tener como objetivo crear las condiciones óptimas para el aprendizaje deseado..., sino también hacer participar a los docentes en métodos pedagógicos alternativos centrados en la equidad y la justicia» (Kohli y otros, pág. 9; 2015, Kumaravadivelu, 2003, pág. 6, citado en Buendía y Macías, 2019). Teniendo en cuenta que Colombia, así como América Latina, son lugares donde la búsqueda de la justicia social, la equidad y el respeto de la diversidad son una necesidad urgente y que, la enseñanza y el aprendizaje de idiomas no pueden desconectarse de esa realidad social, esta puede ser una oportunidad para compartir el pensamiento local con la comunidad académica mundial, de modo que ambas (la comunidad local y la mundial) puedan contribuir a enriquecer las prácticas de enseñanza y aprendizaje de idiomas desde un punto de vista que vaya más allá de la práctica del idioma como tal.

References

Bolaños Saenz, F., Florez, K., Gomez, T., Ramirez Acevedo, M., & Tello Suarez, S. (2018). Implementing a communitybased project in an EFL rural classroom. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 20(2), 264-274. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.13735 [CrossRef]

Bonilla Medina, X. (2012). Tefl educational principles: a proposal for changing times. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(2), 181-192. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.calj.2012.2.a11 [CrossRef]

Buendía, X. P. & Macías, D. F. (2019). The professional development of English language teachers in Colombia: A review of the literature. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 21(1), pp. 89-102.

Castañeda, A. (2012). EFL women-learners construction of the discourse of egalitarianism and knowledge in online-talkin-interaction. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(1), 163-179. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3827 [CrossRef]

Castillo, M. I. (2013). Narratives of place, belonging and language: an intercultural perspective. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 15(2), 312-314. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.calj.2013.2.a013 [CrossRef]

Clavijo, A. (2008). Editorial: Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal. V10: 2-3

Clavijo, A. (2015). Editorial: Research tendencies in the teaching of English as a foreign language. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 17(1), 3-7.

Comber, B. (2018). Community-based approaches to foreign language education.Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 20(2), 151-153. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.13839 [CrossRef]

Ekiaka Nzai, V., Feng, Y.-L., & Reyna, C. (2014). Preparing Net Gen pre-service teachers for digital native classrooms. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 16(2), 185-200. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.calj.2014.2.a04 [CrossRef]

Freire, P., & Freire, A. M. A. (1998). Pedagogy of hope: reliving Pedagogy of the oppressed (New Ed.). New York: Continuum.

Korthagen, F. A. J. (2001). Linking practice and theory: the pedagogy of realistic teacher education. Mahwah, N.J.: L. Erlbaum Associates.

Hernández Castro, O., & Samacá Bohórquez, Y. (2006). A Study of EFL students’ interpretations of cultural aspects in foreign language learning. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, (8), 38-52. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.171 [CrossRef]

Montenegro, A. (2012). Analyzing EFL university learners’ positionings and participation structures in a collaborative learning environment.Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(1), 127-145. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3825 [CrossRef]

Ortiz Medina, J. M. (2017). Shaping your identity as a speaker of English: the struggles of a beginner language learner. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 19(2), 250-262. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.10238 [CrossRef]

Pennycook, A. (2001). Critical Applied Linguistics. London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers LEA.

Quintero, L. M. (2008). Blogging: A way to foster EFL writing. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, (10), 7-49. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.96 [CrossRef]

Quintero, A.H. & Bonilla, S.X. (2020). Editorial: New editors, new challenge at the Colombian Applied Linguistics journal. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 21(2), 2-5. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.15526 [CrossRef]

Rincón, J., & Clavijo-Olarte, A. (2016). Fostering EFL learners' literacies through local inquiry in a multimodal experience. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 18(2), 67-82. https://doi.org/10.14483/calj.v18n2.10610 [CrossRef]

Rojas, M. X. (2012). Female EFL teachers: shifting and multiple gender and language-learner identities. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 14(1), 92-107. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.3823 [CrossRef]

Wink, J. (2005). Critical pedagogy: Notes from the real world. New York, NY: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...