La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles

Reading and grammar learning through mobile phones

Autores/as

  • Shudong Wang Shimane University
  • Simon Smith Caledonian University

Palabras clave:

aprendizaje de idiomas, consideraciones de seguridad y privacidad, eficacia, gramática, lectura, teléfonos móviles (es).

Referencias

Borau, K., Ullrich, C., Feng, J., & Shen, R. (2009). Microblogging for language learning: Using Twitter to train communicative and cultural competence. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 5686, 78–87.

Boston, J. (2009). Social presence, self-presentation, and privacy in tele-collaboration: What information are students willing to share? Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology, 5(3), 29–44. Retrieved from http://rcetj.org/index.php/rcetj/article/view/64/128

Burston, J. (2011). Exploiting the pedagogical potential of MALL. In Proceedings of Mobile Learning as the future of education. San Sebastián, Spain. Retrieved from http://www.moblang.mobi/conference/files/PedagogicalAspectsOfMobileLearning_MobLang_JackBurston.pdf

Butgereit, L., & Botha, A. (2009). The noisy way to practice spelling vocabulary using a cell phone. In P. Cunningham and M. Cunningham (Eds.), IST-Africa 2009 Conference Proceedings, (pp.1–7). Kampala, Uganda: International Information Management Corporation.

Cavus, N., & Ibrahim, D. (2009). m-Learning: An experiment in using SMS to support learning new English language words. British Journal of Educational Technology, 40(1), 78–91.

Chang, C-K., & Hsu, C-K. (2011). A mobile-assisted synchronously collaborative translation–annotation system for English as a foreign language (EFL) reading comprehension. The Journal of Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(2), 155–180.

Chen, C-M., & Chung, C-J. (2008). Personalized mobile English vocabulary learning system based on item response theory and learning memory cycle. Computers and Education, 51, 624–645.

Cheon J., Lee S., Crooks S., & Song, J. (2012). An investigation of mobile learning readiness in higher education based on the theory of planned behavior. Computers and Education, 59(3), 1054–1064.

Comas-Quinn, A., & Mardomingo, R. (2009). Mobile blogs in language learning: Making the most of informal and situated learning opportunities. ReCALL, 21(1), 96–112.

Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: Teaching the crafts of reading, writing, and mathematics. In I,. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction (pp. 453–494). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Day, R., & Bamford, J. (1998). Extensive reading in the second language classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Demouy, V., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2010). On the spot: Using mobile devices for listening and speaking practice on a French language programme. The Journal of Open Distance and e-Learning, 25(3), 217–232.

El-Khatib, K., Korba, L., & Yee, G. (2003). Privacy and security in e-learning. Journal of Distance Education, 1(4), 1–16.

Farrar, L. (2009, February 26). Cell phone stories writing new chapter in print publishing. CNN. Retrieved from http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/02/25/japan.mobilenovels/index.html

Fiorea, S., Cuevasa, H., & Oserb, R. (2003). A picture is worth a thousand connections: The facilitative effects of diagrams on mental model development and task performance. Computers in Human Behavior, 19(2), 185–199.

Glenberg, M., & Langston, W. (1992). Comprehension of illustrated text: Pictures help to build mental models. Journal of Memory and Language. 31(2), 129–151.

Grosseck, G., & Holotesch, C. (2008). Can we use Twitter for educational activities? Paper presented at the Fourth International Scientific Conference eLearning and Software for Education, Bucharest, Romania.

Heffernan, N., & Wang, S. (2008). Copyright and multimedia classroom material: A study from Japan. The Journal of Computer Assisted Language Learning, 21(2), 167–180.

Holbrook, A., Krosnick, J., & Alison, P. (2008). The causes and consequences of response rates in surveys by the news Media and government contractor survey research firms. In J. M. Lepkowski, N. C. Tucker, J. M. Brick, E. D. de Leeuw, L. Japec, P. J. Lavrakas, …, & M. W. Link (Eds.) Advances in telephone survey methodology, pp. 499–528. New York, NY: Wiley.

Huang, L., & Lin, C. (2011). EFL learners’ reading on mobile phones. The JALT CALL Journal 7(1), 61–78.

Huang, S. (2006). Reading English for academic purposes: What situational factors may motivate learners to read? System, 34, 371–383.

Japan Copyright Office (2011). Copyright systems in Japan. Retrieved from http://www.cric.or.jp/cric_e/csj/csj.html

Kawaharazuka, M., & Takeuchi, K. (2010). Considering the cell-phone novel (Keitai Shousetsu). Ochanomizu University Web Library - Institutional Repository. Retrieved from http://teapot.lib.ocha.ac.jp/ocha/bitstream/10083/49269/1/35_131-138.pdf

Kennedy, C., & Levy, M. (2008). L’italiano al telefonino: Using SMS to support beginners’ language learning. ReCALL, 20(3), 315–330.

Kimura, T., Komatsu, Y., Shimagawa, S., Shirahase, F., & Sekine, M. (2005). Nerawareru! Kojinyohou p higaikyousai no houritsu to jitsu [Personal data, privacy and their violation: Law support and cases]. Tokyo, Japan: Civil Law Research Association.

Koskinen, P., Blum, I., Bisson, S., Phillips, S., Creamer, T., & Baker, K. (2000). Book access, shared reading, and audio models: The effects of supporting the literacy learning of linguistically diverse students in school and at home. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92(1), 23–36.

Krashen, S. (1989). We acquire vocabulary and spelling by reading: Additional evidence for the input hypothesis. Modern Language Journal, 73, 440–464.

Lan, Y., Sung, Y., & Chang, K. (2007). A mobile-device supported peer-assisted learning system for collaborative early EFL reading. Language Learning & Technology, 11(3), 130–151. Retrieved from: http://llt.msu.edu/vol11num3/pdf/lansungchang.pdf

Lu, M. (2008). Effectiveness of vocabulary learning via mobile phone. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 24(6), 515–525.

MyNavi Co. Ltd. (2012). Lifestyle survey on 2013 university graduates. Retrieved from http://saponet.mynavi.jp/mynavienq/data/mynavienq_20120124.pdf

Ngeow, K. (1998). Motivation and transfer in language learning. ERIC Digest. Retrieved from http://www.ericdigests.org/1999-4/motivation.htm

Oxford, R., & Shearin, J. (1994). Language learning motivation: Expanding the theoretical framework. The Modern Language Journal, 78(1), 12–28.

Pincas, A. (2004). Using mobile support for use of Greek during the Olympic Games 2004. In Proceedings of M-Learn Conference 2004. Rome, Italy: Learning and Skills Development Agency.

Rutherford, W. (1987). Second language grammar: Learning and teaching. New York, NY: Longman.

Stockwell, G. (2008). Investigating learner preparedness for and usage patterns of mobile learning. ReCALL, 20(3), 253–270.

Stockwell, G. (2010). Using mobile phones for vocabulary activities: Examining the effect of the platform. Language Learning & Technology, 14(2), 95–110. Retrieved from: http://llt.msu.edu/vol14num2/stockwell.pdf

Takase, A. (2003). Effects of eliminating some demotivating factors in reading English extensively. JALT 2003 Conference Proceedings (pp.95–103). Shizuoka, Japan: JALT.

Taylor, D., Drummond, C. & Strang, C. (1997). Surveying general practitioners: does a low response rate matter? The British Journal of General Practice, 47(415), 91–94.

The Cabinet Office of the Japanese Government. (2005). Act on the protection of personal information. Retrieved from http://www.cas.go.jp/jp/seisaku/hourei/data/APPI.pdf

The Cabinet Office of the Japanese Government. (2011). Survey result of Internet use of Japanese teenagers. Retrieved from http://www8.cao.go.jp/youth/youth-harm/chousa/h23/net-jittai/pdf/kekka_g.pdf

Thornton, P., & Houser, C. (2005). Using mobile phones in English education in Japan. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 21, 217–228.

Wang, S., & Heffernan, N. (2010). Ethical issues in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Perception should be in place s of teachers and learners. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(5), 796–813.

Wang, S. & Higgins, M. (2006). Limitations of mobile phone learning. The JALT CALL Journal, 2(1), 3–14.

Warshauer, M. (1997). Computer-mediated collaborative learning: Theory and practice. Modern Language Journal, 81(4), 470–481.

Waycott, J., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2003). Students' experiences with PDAs for reading course materials. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 7(1), 30–43. doi: 10.1007/s00779-002-0211x

Yamaguchi, T. (2005). Vocabulary learning with a mobile phone. Program of the 10th Anniversary Conference of Pan-Pacific Association of Applied Linguistics. Edinburgh, UK

Cómo citar

APA

Wang, S., & Smith, S. (2016). La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles. Enunciación, 21(1), 153–172. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10

ACM

[1]
Wang, S. y Smith, S. 2016. La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles. Enunciación. 21, 1 (ene. 2016), 153–172. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10.

ACS

(1)
Wang, S.; Smith, S. La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles. Enunciación 2016, 21, 153-172.

ABNT

WANG, S.; SMITH, S. La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles. Enunciación, [S. l.], v. 21, n. 1, p. 153–172, 2016. DOI: 10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/enunc/article/view/10850. Acesso em: 1 oct. 2022.

Chicago

Wang, Shudong, y Simon Smith. 2016. «La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles». Enunciación 21 (1):153-72. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10.

Harvard

Wang, S. y Smith, S. (2016) «La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles», Enunciación, 21(1), pp. 153–172. doi: 10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10.

IEEE

[1]
S. Wang y S. Smith, «La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles», Enunciación, vol. 21, n.º 1, pp. 153–172, ene. 2016.

MLA

Wang, S., y S. Smith. «La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles». Enunciación, vol. 21, n.º 1, enero de 2016, pp. 153-72, doi:10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10.

Turabian

Wang, Shudong, y Simon Smith. «La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles». Enunciación 21, no. 1 (enero 1, 2016): 153–172. Accedido octubre 1, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/enunc/article/view/10850.

Vancouver

1.
Wang S, Smith S. La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles. Enunciación [Internet]. 1 de enero de 2016 [citado 1 de octubre de 2022];21(1):153-72. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/enunc/article/view/10850

Descargar cita

Visitas

950

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.
Untitled Document

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.enunc.2016.1.a10

La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles

Reading and grammar learning through mobile phones

Shudong Wang1 Simon Smith 2

Traductor: Wilder Yesid Escobar Alméciga, Mg.3

Cómo citar este artículo:Wang, S. y Smith, S. (2016). La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática a través de teléfonos móviles. Enunciación, 21(1), 153-172..


1 Shimane University, Shimane, Japón. Correo electrónico: wangsd@soc.shimane-u.ac.jp

2 Caledonian University, Glasgow, Reino Unido. Correo electrónico: simon_d_smith34@hotmail.com

3 Magíster en Lingüística Aplicada a la Enseñanza del Inglés de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas. Docente de la Universidad del Bosque. Correo electrónico: escobar.w@gmail.com


Resumen

Este artículo describe un proyecto en curso acerca del aprendizaje de idiomas mediante un reporte parcial, tres años después del inicio de su implementación. Aquí se examina tanto la viabilidad como las limitaciones del desarrollo de habilidades de lectura y gramática en inglés a través de la interfaz de los teléfonos móviles. Materiales de lectura y gramática se enviaron regularmente a lo largo del proyecto a los teléfonos móviles de los estudiantes, quienes leyeron o interactuaron de alguna manera con los materiales que les llamaban la atención. La información obtenida de los participantes y los registros del servidor indican que la lectura y el aprendizaje de la gramática, utilizando dispositivos móviles, fueron considerados experiencias positivas del lenguaje. Sin embargo, los datos también indican que el éxito de cualquier proyecto de aprendizaje a través de estos dispositivos podría ser limitado, a menos que se cumplan ciertos criterios, los cuales incluyen: a) proporcionar material de aprendizaje interesante que no sean muy extenso ni demasiado exigente; b) brindar un grado adecuado de acompañamiento; c) incentivar la participación activa de los estudiantes; d) ofrecer incentivos; e) garantizar el respeto a la privacidad, f) crear un entorno de aprendizaje móvil y técnico que sea seguro y protegido.

Palabras clave: aprendizaje de idiomas, consideraciones de seguridad y privacidad, eficacia, gramática, lectura, teléfonos móviles.

Introducción

Los teléfonos móviles en la educación

Japón tiene una de las redes celulares más avanzadas del mundo y la población estudiantil, en su mayoría, cuenta con un teléfono móvil. En parte, debido a la ubicuidad de la tecnología Wi-Fi y WiMAX, los usuarios de teléfonos inteligentes se han convertido en la norma y no la excepción. Hay tres razones principales que explican dicha tendencia. En primer lugar, los teléfonos inteligentes de compatibilidad Wi-Fi o WiMAX tienen la misma conectividad que los computadores. Incluso, en el actual entorno 3G y 4G, la capacidad de procesamiento de datos de teléfonos móviles ofrece a los usuarios una flexibilidad mucho mayor que antes. El cambio no se limita solo al entorno inalámbrico, también el hardware de estos dispositivos ha experimentado una evolución exponencial.

Otra razón para la proliferación del uso de teléfonos inteligentes es que el tamaño de la pantalla de algunos de ellos ha aumentado a cinco pulgadas o más, y la resolución ha mejorado hasta alrededor de 1980 × 1080 píxeles. Por último, la capacidad de procesamiento de su CPU sigue evolucionando, y las tarjetas de memoria pueden almacenar decenas de gigabytes de datos, lo que los hace comparables con muchos computadores.

Es claro que la brecha de funcionalidades operativas entre los teléfonos móviles y la tecnología PC se ha reducido proporcionándoles a los educadores una mayor libertad para hacer trascender el aprendizaje, más allá de los entornos educativos tradicionales.

Si bien las limitaciones para el uso del teléfono móvil en la educación existieron en el pasado (Wang y Higgins, 2006), estas se han comenzado a disipar a razón de los avances de la tecnología de la información. Por ejemplo, los problemas asociados a las bandas de reducida capacidad se han subsanado gracias a las tecnologías de conexión Wi-Fi, 3.5G, y las redes 4G. Del mismo modo, las dificultades de digitación manual de texto se han resuelto con la tecnología de reconocimiento de voz, pantallas táctiles y los estiletes. Desde la aparición de los teléfonos inteligentes en 2007 se les ha venido incorporado progresivamente funciones que eran antes exclusivas de PC y de otros dispositivos de mano.

En Japón, la mayoría de los teléfonos móviles están equipados con cámaras fotográficas y de video, tecnología de respuesta rápida (QR), grabadoras de voz, reproductores de MP3/MP4 y 1seg, que permiten la recepción móvil de televisión terrestre, sistema de posicionamiento global (GPS), acceso a internet, correo electrónico, servicio de mensajería corta (SMS) y servicio de mensajería multimedia (MMS).

Aplicaciones como YouTube, Facebook, Sky- pe, Twitter, Flash o recursos multimedia habilitados para Java son accesibles en teléfonos móviles. En otras palabras: el entorno digital de hoy en día ha desdibujado la diferencia entre los teléfonos móviles y los computadores. En la medida en que el precio de los primeros cae, dejan de ser una herramienta de una élite minoritaria.

De acuerdo con la encuesta Mynavi Co. Ltd. (2012), el 59,3 % de los estudiantes japoneses actualmente poseen teléfonos inteligentes. Aunque no podemos presuponer que tales números se puedan trasladar a un alto número de estudiantes de idiomas que usen sus celulares para tal propósito, las predicciones para altas correlaciones futuras parecen probables.

Por ejemplo, Cheon, Lee, Crooks y Song (2012) indican que los estudiantes universitarios en Estados Unidos están comenzando a aceptar el m-learning. De igual manera, en Japón, la mayoría de los estudiantes encuestados por Thornton y Houser (2005) prefieren recibir los materiales de aprendizaje en sus teléfonos móviles en lugar de en sus computadores.

La teoría pedagógica actual también demuestra un entusiasmo paralelo hacia el aprendizaje móvil. Según la teoría del aprendizaje situado (SLT, por sus siglas en inglés) (Collins, Brown y Newman, 1989; Warschauer, 1997), un verdadero aprendizaje no es intencional y se sitúa en actividades auténticas, el contexto y la cultura.

En una discusión acerca de la eficacia de mobile assisted language learning (aprendizaje móvil asistido), Burston (2011) afirma que las teorías conductistas centradas en el profesor pueden apoyar y complementar las aplicaciones de telefonía móvil para vocabulario y gramática enfocadas en el estudiante. Aunque puede ser prematuro juzgar la eficacia del aprendizaje móvil, la colaboración y los enfoques pedagógicos centrados en el estudiante, sin duda, han informado e inspirado la evolución de programas de aprendizaje móvil.

El aprendizaje del lenguaje por medio de teléfonos móviles

Los teléfonos inteligentes están siendo cada vez más utilizados para el aprendizaje de idiomas y, específicamente, de vocabulario, como se muestra en un sin número de estudios (Chen y Chung, 2008; Kennedy y Levy, 2008; Lu, 2008; Pincas, 2004; Stockwell, 2008; Stockwell 2010; Thorn- ton y Houser, 2005; Yamaguchi, 2005). Para ilustrar, Lu (2008) motivó a algunos estudiantes a aprender dos grupos de palabras en inglés, tanto con teléfonos móviles como en formato de papel. Se encontró que los que aprendían a través de SMS llegaban a entender más palabras que aquellos que trabajaban en el formato de papel. Kennedy y De Levy (2008) investigaron la aceptabilidad de un pushed mode (modo inducido) de funcionamiento del teléfono móvil; estos autores enviaron mensajes cortos en los que mezclaban palabras conocidas y desconocidas. De esta manera, descubrieron que los estudiantes apreciaban la experiencia de revisar información previamente aprendida y que, a menudo, el contenido del mensaje les parecía útil y agradable.

Butgereit y Botha (2009) diseñaron un sistema que les permitiera crear listas de ortografía o de vocabulario en inglés y afrikáans a los profesores de idiomas. En consecuencia, el sistema generaba una aplicación de telefonía móvil divertida que usaba diversos conversores de texto a voz que invitaban a los estudiantes africanos a practicar la ortografía de las palabras. Cavo e Ibrahim (2009) desarrollaron un sistema para enviar palabras técnicas en inglés, junto con los significados en forma de SMS.

Estos estudios también demuestran que la utilidad de MALL no se limita solo al aprendizaje del vocabulario; los teléfonos móviles también se pueden usar en otras situaciones de aprendizaje.

Comas-Quinn y Mardomingo (2009) llevaron a cabo un proyecto de aprendizaje móvil que involucraba a los estudiantes en la creación de un recurso en línea para trabajar una cultura extranjera. En su proyecto, los estudiantes utilizaban sus teléfonos móviles, cámaras digitales y grabadoras de MP3 para seleccionar y grabar muestras de sus encuentros con las culturas extranjeras. Luego, los estudiantes enviaban o subían estos encuentros a un blog cultural para compartirlos con otros miembros del grupo.

Chang y Hsu (2011) desarrollaron un sistema para integrar un modo de traducción instantáneo y una función de anotación de traducción compartida instantánea multiusuario para apoyar un curso de lectura intensiva de forma sincrónica en el aula normal. El proyecto fue diseñado para asistentes personales digitales (PDA), no para teléfonos móviles.

Demouy y Kukulska-Hulme (2010) también reportaron un proyecto que les permite a los estudiantes utilizar los iPods y reproductores de MP3, así como los teléfonos móviles, para practicar escuchar y hablar. Ellos encontraron que, si bien el uso de iPods y reproductores de MP3 fue fácilmente adoptado por los participantes del proyecto, llevar a cabo las actividades a través de los teléfonos móviles se consideró menos satisfactorio. A pesar del reto de integrar los teléfonos con un entorno de aprendizaje, se ha demostrado que a medida que los usuarios se vuelven más hábiles en la interacción con las interfaces digitales, sus estilos de aprendizaje y la forma como perciben el material de aprendizaje cambia (Stoc- kwell, 2010). Asignar tareas más pequeñas como miniensayos y cuestionarios de gramática puede ser más adecuado para alcanzar una mejor experiencia de aprendizaje con estos dispositivos. De hecho, algunos académicos (Rutherford, 1987; Krashen, 1989) sugieren que el tiempo de adquisición mejora cuando se aprende agrupando el lenguaje en trozos comprensibles y manejables. Con esto en mente, y con el fin de enfrentar la falta de información sobre el desarrollo de las habilidades de lectura y de gramática a través de los teléfonos móviles, se hizo un primer intento en 2009, dándoles a los estudiantes el material de aprendizaje de gramática y de lectura en inglés en pequeños trozos.

Propósito del estudio

En comparación con los ensayos de aprendizaje y prácticas de vocabulario por medio de teléfonos móviles para desarrollar el escucha y el habla, hay significativamente menos investigación sobre las ventajas de los programas de telefonía móvil para desarrollar la lectura y la práctica de la gramática. Waycott y Kukulska-Hulme (2003) reportan que los estudiantes tenían dificultades para leer los materiales del curso en un formato PDA (un dispositivo móvil que no es popular entre los estudiantes universitarios en Japón) y que lo consideraban de inferior calidad a la de la lectura hecha en papel. Lan, Sung y Chang (2007) exploraron el potencial de la tecnología móvil para la lectura, pero sus experimentos se limitaron a las tabletas PC, además su grupo de participantes solo incluía estudiantes de primaria. La investigación de Huang y Lin (2011) demostró que, en términos de lectura, recibir materiales en papel es preferible a recibir recursos a través de teléfonos móviles o de correo electrónico, independientemente de la extensión de los textos. Si bien este es un hallazgo importante, en el proyecto solo participaron diez estudiantes; por otra parte, el estudio se basó en la lectura de tan solo seis textos.

Además de la falta de investigaciones sobre lectura y el aprendizaje de la gramática a través de dispositivos móviles, otro factor importante que inspiró este proyecto es la popularidad que tienen las novelas en formatos para telefonía móvil escritas en japonés. Kawaharazuka y Takeuchi (2010) y Farrar (2009) reportan que para 2007, cinco de las novelas impresas más vendidas en Japón se escribieron y se leyeron en teléfonos móviles. La prevalencia de la lectura de novelas en teléfonos se interpretó como un indicio positivo de que los estudiantes potencialmente verían este proyecto con buenos ojos, si algunos de estos protocolos fueran adoptados incorporando, por ejemplo, el uso frecuente de la línea de retorno y frases cortas con pocos modificadores. Con dichos factores en mente les queríamos ofrecer a los estudiantes una modalidad de aprendizaje que les ayudara a mejorar su inglés y que nos permitiera tener una mejor comprensión del aprendizaje de la lectura y la gramática por medio de los teléfonos móviles; esto a su vez, nos facilitó evaluar el grado de motivación de los alumnos para aprender en sus teléfonos móviles fuera del aula de clase. Por estas razones, en 2009 se inició un proyecto llamado “Inglés ubicuo”.

Para sumergir por completo a los participantes en un ambiente de aprendizaje provechoso, se enviaron ensayos y pruebas de gramática cortas en inglés, a través de sus teléfonos móviles, dos o tres veces a la semana. Luego ellos debían completar las actividades en sus teléfonos móviles en su propio tiempo. Durante la implementación de nuestro proyecto de tres años, surgieron reiterativamente varias preguntas, las cuales se convertían en una fuerza motivadora del estudio; por ejemplo: a) ¿Los estudiantes están preparados para leer en un idioma extranjero y desarrollar cuestionarios de gramática en sus teléfonos móviles? b) Cuando los estudiantes leen en los teléfonos móviles, ¿qué tipo de temas los motivan y qué tipo de temas no logran cautivar su interés?

c) ¿Cuándo se presenta la posibilidad de elegir entre tener acceso a materiales en los dispositivos móviles o en PC, que eligen instintivamente los estudiantes? d) ¿Qué percepciones tienen los estudiantes acerca de la lectura y la gramática en teléfonos móviles? e) ¿Qué preocupaciones tienen los estudiantes sobre el aprendizaje de idiomas utilizando sus teléfonos móviles? Con el abordaje de estas preguntas, este trabajo intenta cerrar la brecha de la investigación actual sobre el desarrollo lector móvil y la práctica de la gramática, además de motivar futuras investigaciones sobre esta población específica de estudiantes.

Método

El desarrollo de lectura móvil y material de gramática

Los materiales de lectura inicialmente usados en este proyecto fueron desarrollados por profesores universitarios del Centro para la Educación Extranjera de la Universidad de Shimane (Japón). Con el fin de mejorar y ampliar el programa, diez estudiantes de nivel avanzado se contrataron temporalmente para escribir ensayos que serían leídos por nuestros participantes. Estos materiales fueron subidos por los estudiantes y luego editados por los profesores de la universidad. Sin embargo, la tarea de escribir ensayos cortos fue asignada principalmente a los profesores hablantes nativos del inglés. Al comienzo del proyecto, se acordó que cada composición no tendría más de 140 palabras en extensión, de manera que cada ensayo se pudiera leer en una pantalla pequeña en no más de dos o tres minutos (Borau, Ullrich, Feng y Shen, 2009; Grosseck y Holotesch, 2008).

Con el propósito de cautivar la atención de la mayoría de estudiantes de primer año, cuyo conocimiento de inglés frisa el nivel preinterme- dio, todos los materiales fueron escritos en inglés sencillo y fácil de entender. Se les agregó una traducción anotada en japonés a las palabras que, pensamos, podrían causar problemas de traducción. Los datos relacionados con el vocabulario se situaban al principio del ensayo para que los lectores estuvieran al tanto de las palabras antes de iniciar la lectura de este. Los estudiantes tenían la opción de hacer clic en la URL adjunta al ensayo de texto y leer la traducción al japonés; sin embrago, leer la traducción antes del ensayo no era recomendable. Hubo un sinnúmero de razones para que decidiéramos usar materiales propios en este proyecto. En primer lugar, la creación de materiales de lectura y gramática originales evitan los problemas éticos y legales relacionados con los derechos de autor. La ley japonesa de derechos de autor (Capítulo 2, Sección 1) estipula que una página web y todos sus documentos vinculados están protegidos por derechos de autor. Los profesores pueden reproducir estos materiales y utilizarlos en el aula, solo si no causan perjuicio injustificado al dueño de los derechos de autor (Copyright Office Japón, 2011). En esencia, esto implica que los profesores deben tener cuidado para asegurar que en el único lugar en el que se utilicen los materiales sea en el aula (Heffernan y Wang, 2008). Por otra parte, tener materiales de aprendizaje creados por los profesores –quienes están familiarizados con las necesidades de aprendizaje de sus estudiantes– tendría potencialmente un efecto más positivo sobre el aprendizaje en el aula y, con suerte, aumentaría la motivación para el aprendizaje de idiomas. Además, desde una perspectiva pedagógica, la creación de materiales propios los hace más relevantes y aplicables a diferentes situaciones (Ngeow, 1998). Esto también se ve reflejado en la investigación anterior sobre la motivación.

En uno de estos estudios, Oxford y Shearin (1994) analizaron 12 teorías de la motivación e identificaron seis factores que afectan la motivación en el aprendizaje de idiomas. Uno de los factores destacados fue el apoyo del medio ambiente, que se define como “el grado de apoyo del profesor y de pares, y la integración del apoyo cultural y de fuerzas externas a la clase en la experiencia de aprendizaje”. Con el fin de cautivar a nuestros jóvenes participantes, los temas elegidos para el proyecto de aprendizaje móvil eran amplios y de actualidad, no eran demasiado exigentes e incluían chistes y adivinanzas. Aunque las habilidades relacionadas a la escucha nunca fueron el foco de este proyecto, nos dimos cuenta de que la lectura acompañada de imágenes y audio es siempre más eficaz que el formato simple del solo texto (Fiorea, Cuevasa, y Oserb, 2003; Glenberg y Langston, 1992; Koskinen et al., 2000). En consecuencia, desde agosto de 2011, todos los materiales en nuestro proyecto han incluido contenido tanto de audio como visual para apoyar las lecturas. Luego, los estudiantes podían escuchar o visualizar cada lectura (véase el ejemplo de ensayo en la figura 1, izquierda, y la animación con formato MP4 en la figura 1, derecha).

Junto con el texto de lectura, que normalmente era una historia corta, una broma o una anécdota, se proporcionaban dos tipos de materiales:

explicaciones gramaticales y cuestionarios de gramática. En un programa de aprendizaje anterior, habíamos descubierto que la mayoría de los estudiantes de nuestra universidad presentaban deficiencias en el uso de los sustantivos, el modo subjuntivo, participios y las formas negativas. Para hacerle frente a estas áreas, las explicaciones gramaticales enviadas a los estudiantes se enfocaban en dichos elementos.

Todas las explicaciones gramaticales de elementos se asociaban a un URL de un cuestionario gramatical en línea. Para responder a un objetivo específico del proyecto, las explicaciones gramaticales eran impartidas de manera explícita (aprendizaje inducido), mientras que los cuestionarios de gramática fueron abordados como cuestionarios de su conocimiento (aprendizaje jalonado). A veces se agregaban juegos de preguntas relacionados con los contenidos gramaticales en inglés para aumentar la motivación de los estudiantes. Debido a que la mayoría de los lectores eran estudiantes de primer año con un nivel preintermedio, parte de la sección de gramática fue escrita en japonés (figura 2).

Los participantes/estudiantes registrados

Debido a que los materiales de aprendizaje eran enviados, en su mayoría, a través de correo electrónico, nuestra prioridad era obtener sus direcciones de correo electrónico. Ya que se trata de información personal, está estrictamente protegida por la ley japonesa (Oficina del Gabinete del Gobierno de Japón, 2005), los estudiantes no tenían ninguna obligación de darle a los profesores sus direcciones de correo electrónico (El-Khatib, Korba y Yee, 2003; Kimura, Komatsu, Shimagawa, Shirahase, y Sekine, 2005). Por lo cual, después de distribuirles folletos a los estudiantes de primer año, se explicó el objetivo de nuestro proyecto con el fin de solicitar sus direcciones de correo electrónico. Se les pidió que las registraran voluntariamente y se les informó que estas se utilizarían únicamente para este proyecto. También se les aclaró que se podían retirar en cualquier momento. Al comenzar el proyecto, nos dimos cuenta de que muchos estudiantes podrían estar reacios a compartir su información personal con un sistema de e-learning (Boston, 2009; Wang y Heffernan, 2010), por lo que aceptamos el uso de seudónimos en sus correos electrónicos. En total, en junio de 2012, 372 direcciones habían sido registradas para el proyecto. Lastimosamente, no todos los que se registraron fueron participantes permanentes, lo que redujo el número de participantes activos a 208. Esta pérdida significativa respondió a cuatro razones: a) algunos estudiantes percibieron el programa como inadecuado para su estilo de aprendizaje y optaron por cancelar su suscripción; b) los estudiantes japoneses suelen cambiar sus direcciones de correo electrónico de sus teléfonos móviles para evadir correos spam, y algunos de nuestros participantes olvidaron actualizar esta información; c) muchos teléfonos móviles de estudiantes están programados por las compañías de telecomunicaciones para bloquear correos electrónicos enviados de computadores, y d) algunos correos electrónicos enviados desde el servidor del proyecto fueron filtrados automáticamente a la carpeta de correo no deseado.

El modo de envío de material de aprendizaje móvil

Una vez creados, los materiales de lectura y gramática se cargaron al servidor y luego fueron enviados a los estudiantes a través del sistema de correo electrónico del servidor como texto plano con las direcciones URL adjuntas. El sistema de correo electrónico se configuró para que enviara 20 correos por minuto en texto plano para reducir la posibilidad de que los materiales de aprendizaje fueran bloqueados como spam o fueran considerados como sospechosos.

Un ejercicio sencillo de comprensión se incluyó en los textos de lectura para comprobar la comprensión del estudiante. Las pruebas de gramática se enviarona través de las direcciones URL vinculadas a cada revisión gramatical (figura 3). Cuando los estudiantes abrían sus correos, los materiales de lectura podían ser leídos como mensajes, por lo que los estudiantes no necesitaban ir más allá del enlace proporcionado. Se utilizó un sistema de comentarios/cuestionario para facilitar la interacción entre el estudiante y el profesor. Todos estos sistemas se diseñaron exclusivamente para los teléfonos móviles, pero también eran compatibles con cualquier PC. Los enlaces URL contenían notas de traducción al japonés, interfaces de materiales de rango y pruebas de gramática. La figura 4 indica el flujo de información a lo largo del proyecto.

La inscripción para el proyecto estaba siempre abierta, pero los estudiantes que se unieron en fechas posteriores no podían acceder a lecturas anteriores. En este caso, se construyó un sistema de blog para almacenar el material de archivo para que los estudiantes pudieran realizar búsquedas de recursos trabajados anteriormente. Se archivaron todos los materiales que se enviaron a través de mensajes de correo electrónico en formato web, usando el sistema de gestión de contenidos de código abierto, WordPress. El sitio web (http://www. shimadaielearning.saloon.jp/keitai-eigo/) se personalizó para el uso en teléfonos móviles. Entre junio de 2010 y junio de 2013, el archivo del sitio de blogs de teléfonos móviles registró 68.166 visitas a las páginas.

Recolección de datos

Los datos de la retroalimentación del proyecto se obtuvieron con los siguientes métodos: encuestas en línea, análisis de registros del servidor y entrevistas. Se llevaron a cabo tres encuestas en línea consecutivas escritas en japonés entre los participantes en 2010, 2011 y 2012. Los datos presentados en este documento corresponden a la última encuesta realizada en abril de 2012. La URL de la encuesta se les envió a los estudiantes por correo electrónico, junto con la justificación y las preguntas de la encuesta. Se les informó acerca del carácter anónimo y confidencial de su participación y se les aclaró que el diligenciamiento del cuestionario era voluntario. Este último se enviaba a sus teléfonos móviles y se redujo a ocho preguntas cortas; siete eran de selección múltiple y la última era abierta acerca del proyecto (véase apéndice).

La encuesta estuvo disponible en línea por dos semanas, del 2 al 16 de abril. Las preguntas de la encuesta se agruparon en tres categorías: las preguntas 1, 5, 6 y 7 indagaban sobre los materiales que a los estudiantes les gustaba leer en los dispositivos móviles. La pregunta 2 examinaba el tipo de dispositivo de aprendizaje digital que se utilizaba para recibir los materiales. Las 3 y 4 abordaban las percepciones generales de los estudiantes sobre el proyecto. La mitad de las preguntas pedían una evaluación de los materiales de aprendizaje de los estudiantes. Esto se debe a que según el modelo de valor y expectativa, de Day y Bamfors (1998), el buen desarrollo de material es un factor clave para motivar a los estudiantes a leer en idiomas extranjeros. únicamente cuando los materiales son personalizados para atender las características específicas de los estudiantes, (fáciles de leer, cortos, con contenidos relevantes e interesantes) que estos llegan a convertirse en una fuerza motivadora para que el estudiante continúe su aprendizaje (Takase, 2003).

Cincuenta y seis participantes del proyecto respondieron el cuestionario (n = 56), esto representa una tasa aproximada de respuesta del 27 %. El hecho de que esta cifra fue un tanto baja no implica que la encuesta fuese inexacta o no representativa (Taylor, Drummond, y Strang, 1997; Holbrook, Krosnick, y Alison, 2007), además, se utilizaron datos de otros registros del proyecto, y se hizo un análisis de datos del servidor y entrevistas, para corroborar los resultados del cuestionario. Técnicamente, el sistema no pudo detectar si los materiales de aprendizaje enviados en formato de texto, por correo electrónico, se leyeron o no, pero el número de clics sobre la URL vinculada a los mensajes de correo electrónico fue registrado por el servidor. En el sistema queda registrado quién y cuándo se desarrolló el cuestionario y los detalles de la calificación. También se podía realizar un seguimiento de las direcciones IP de los materiales archivados en el sitio de blogs y almacenar la información sobre el tipo de material al que se ha accedido.

Se seleccionaron dos grupos de participantes para que contestaran la entrevista. El primero, lo integraron quienes participaron desde el inicio hasta el final del estudio; el segundo, los que iniciaron pero se retiraron después de un corto periodo de participación. En total, cuatro estudiantes –dos hombres y dos mujeres escogidos al azar entre todos los que se registraron con sus nombres reales–, fueron entrevistados después de clase en días diferentes. Durante la entrevista se le interrogó a cada usuario por qué había elegido continuar o no con el proyecto.

Resultados

La pregunta de investigación 1: la adecuación de materiales para la lectura y la gramática

La primera pregunta indagaba acerca de la actitud de los participantes hacia los materiales de aprendizaje desarrollados por sus pares: 10 estudiantes de la universidad. De los 56 encuestados, 36 (64 %) dijeron que disfrutaban los ensayos y que les gustaban también los cuestionarios de gramática escritos por estudiantes. Los 20 restantes (36 %) mostraron indiferencia al seleccionar la opción neutral. Esta es una clara indicación de que la mayoría de los alumnos aceptan y acogen la lectura y los materiales de aprendizaje desarrollados por sus compañeros. También fue posible analizar los comentarios de nuestros registros del servidor en relación a los materiales creados por estudiantes ya que, por cada mensaje enviado, ellos tenían la oportunidad de comentar. Siempre que los materiales de aprendizaje se enviaban, se incluía el nombre del autor para que los lectores lo pudieran identificar. En promedio, los materiales de aprendizaje desarrollados por profesores nativos de habla inglesa recibieron tres comentarios cada uno. Curiosamente, este número aumentó a un promedio de 5, cuando los materiales eran escritos por los estudiantes (y corregidos por los profesores). Cuando los cuestionarios eran creados por los estudiantes, el promedio de alumnos que participaban también aumentó de 20 a 25. Si bien los datos no son estadísticamente significativos (t = 2,33, p < 0,05), los comentarios de los usuarios fueron muy positivos, como se demuestra a continuación:

Este es un buen intento. En realidad, no sabía que el ensayo había sido escrito por mi compañero de escuela, hasta que vi el nombre del autor.
Leer ensayos escritos por nosotros mismos, sobre nosotros mismos y por nosotros mismos se siente personal. ¿Puedo también contribuir con mis ensayos?

Estas observaciones muestran que los materiales de lectura y gramática móviles creados por los estudiantes probablemente aumentan la motivación para leer. Por otra parte, a pesar de no ser textos auténticos (publicados y de autoría de un hablante nativo del inglés) no fueron, de ninguna manera, vistos como de inferior calidad por los estudiantes; por el contrario, el encanto o la aprobación provenían probablemente del hecho de que la escritura era de los mismos estudiantes. Para el futuro desarrollo de materiales de aprendizaje móvil, vale la pena considerar una participación extensa de los estudiantes.

Las preguntas 5 y 6 se diseñaron para clasificar los materiales. Ensayos en inglés (41 %), juegos de preguntas (34 %) y cuestionarios de gramática (27 %) se clasificaron como los más leídos o a los que se accedían con más frecuencia. El 7 % de los estudiantes encuestados clasificó “todos los materiales” como los más leídos, y el mismo porcentaje de los estudiantes dijo que “ninguno” era el más leído. Los resultados sugieren que, en vez de responder cuestionarios de gramática, los estudiantes prefirieron leer ensayos y responder juegos de preguntas acerca del lenguaje. El hecho de que se prefieran los ensayos a los cuestionarios de gramática nos debe recordar que el material para leer o interactuar en teléfonos móviles no debe ser demasiado exigente. En cuanto a los diferentes géneros del ensayo, estos han sido clasificados en orden descendiente según la preferencia de los estudiantes: chistes en inglés y adivinanzas (45 %), diferencias culturales (30 %), la vida y el entretenimiento (27 %), y temas relacionados con el medio ambiente (12,5 %) y proverbios (12,5 %). Entre los temas menos populares se encuentran: la metodología de aprendizaje de inglés (5 %), ciencia y tecnología (4 %), la sociedad (4 %) y la política (4 %). Los resultados de la clasificación de los temas de los ensayos demuestran que el aprendizaje a través de materiales interesantes (chistes en inglés y adivinanzas), o algo más esotérico (diferencias culturales o vida en el campus) puede cautivar más la atención y estimular el desarrollo de cualquier proyecto.

La pregunta 7 pedía clasificar la idoneidad de los materiales de aprendizaje utilizados en el proyecto de acuerdo con el nivel de inglés de los estudiantes y a sus propias necesidades. El 63 % pensó que el nivel de complejidad de la escritura era el adecuado, mientras que el 37 % indicó que pensaba que los materiales eran difíciles. De esto podemos afirmar que los materiales desarrollados por los profesores y los compañeros son muy adecuados y son bien vistos por los estudiantes. Además de la información anterior, también buscamos en los registros de acceso de nuestros materiales en línea utilizando un plugin de WordPress llamado “Mapa del visitante”. Esto registró el tráfico diario entre el 1 de junio y el 10 de junio de 2012. El número de veces que se accedió a cada ensayo se detalla en la tabla 1.

Como se puede observa en la tabla 1, los ensayos relacionados a las diferencias culturales (21 % de todos los accesos) y chistes en inglés/ adivinanzas siguieron siendo los temas más populares entre los lectores. Los datos del acceso a la Web confirmaron la preferencia que los estudiantes tenían por los materiales identificados en la encuesta.

La pregunta de investigación 2: la posición de los dispositivos móviles de aprendizaje

La pregunta 2 indagaba acerca del dispositivo que cada estudiante utiliza para recibir los materiales de aprendizaje. De 41 encuestados (73 %) afirmaron utilizar un teléfono móvil; 14 (25 %) dijeron haber usado las direcciones del correo electrónico de su PC para el proyecto. Solamente un alumno reportó el uso de su iPad para recibir los materiales. Los datos son consistentes con los de registro de los correos electrónicos de los participantes del proyecto. De los 372 registrados, 279 (75 %) se registraron en sus teléfonos móviles, aunque también tenían la opción de hacerlo por medio de sus direcciones de correo electrónico en sus PC. Lo anterior destaca la disposición y la confianza que los estudiantes de primer año tienen para usar teléfonos móviles para el aprendizaje de idiomas, lo que también concuerda con la investigación de Thornton y Houser (2005). Incluso, los resultados de nuestra investigación reflejan cifras recientemente publicadas en cuanto a un alto uso de teléfonos móviles; de hecho, el 95,6 % de los estudiantes de bachillerato en Japón poseen teléfonos móviles, de los cuales el 95,1 % tienen conexión a internet; de los estudiantes del instituto de secundaria, 75,6 % utilizan internet más de dos horas al día (Oficina del Gabinete del Gobierno de Japón, 2011). Los mismos resultados de la encuesta muestran que los estudiantes de primer año de universidad, normalmente entre los 18 a los 19 años de edad, han usado teléfonos móviles por varios años y se han convertido en usuarios expertos a múltiples niveles. Esto podría explicar la razón por la cual una gran proporción de los encuestados (73 %) afirmaron usar teléfonos móviles para acceder a los materiales de aprendizaje.

La pregunta de investigación 3: la percepción general de los teléfonos móviles para la lectura y la gramática

Las preguntas 3 y 4 exploraban la percepción que los estudiantes tenían acerca del proyecto, en términos generales. La pregunta 3 planteaba: “¿Con qué frecuencia usted lee los materiales de aprendizaje?”. Cuarenta estudiantes (71 %) respondieron que habían leído casi todos los materiales, 11 (20 %) dijeron que habían leído todo y 5 (9 %) indicaron que, aunque estaban inscritos en el proyecto, nunca habían leído los contenidos.

La número 4 examinaba si el proyecto era útil para mejorar su capacidad de lectura y la gramática en inglés. Cuarenta (71 %) respondieron de manera positiva, pues creían que el proyecto, en general, era muy útil para el desarrollo de su capacidad de lectura y conocimientos gramaticales. De acuerdo con nuestro cuestionario, el proyecto fue bien recibido por los estudiantes. El hecho de que el proyecto no estuviera asociado con ningún curso de inglés obligatorio hacía que los estudiantes se sintieran libres de escoger o ignorar cualquiera de los materiales de aprendizaje; a pesar de esto, el 20 % indicó que había leído todos los materiales. De igual manera, el 71 % de los participantes consideraron que sus capacidades de lectura y gramática habían mejorado como resultado de su participación en el proyecto. Idealmente, el progreso de las habilidades lectoras y gramaticales de los estudiantes se debería evaluar cada año. Sin embargo, como se dijo anteriormente, el objetivo de este proyecto era proporcionar un entorno amable para la lectura y la práctica de la gramática. También queríamos explorar el impacto que pudieran tener los ejercicios de lectura y de gramática informales asistidos por dispositivos móviles. Dado que la participación era voluntaria y los estudiantes no tenían vinculación con aulas físicas, cualquier forma de evaluación era un reto significativo. La evaluación de los resultados del aprendizaje móvil puede ser difícil si los alumnos no pueden reunirse en un entorno controlado para evaluaciones (Wang y Higgins, 2006).

Por último, la pregunta 8 era abierta y motivaba percepciones generales sobre el proyecto y de la cual surgieron 26 comentarios. La mayoría de los estudiantes (71 %) percibieron la lectura de ensayos cortos en los teléfonos móviles como una herramienta útil que mejora su capacidad lectora. Los comentarios que figuran a continuación representan la percepción general del programa:

Me gustaron los ensayos cortos y me parecieron interesantes.
A pesar de que no siempre tengo tiempo para leer los ensayos, creo que es una buena oportunidad para nosotros que estemos expuestos al inglés.
Estoy demasiado ocupado para leer todos los ensayos; sin embargo, creo que esto es una buena manera de entrar en contacto con inglés auténtico.
Me gusta leer en los teléfonos móviles. A diferencia de la lectura en un PC, puedo leer en cualquier momento y en cualquier lugar.
Las palabras en los ensayos son a veces difíciles, pero al mismo tiempo, los ensayos son fáciles de entender. ¡Es un buen proyecto!

Estos comentarios encierran la opinión de los estudiantes, según la cual la lectura en los teléfonos móviles aumenta su contacto con el inglés. Los participantes indicaron que les gustaba el modo de lectura de contenidos enviados al teléfono. Curiosamente, muchos comentaron que preferirían recibir el material de una manera ad hoc en lugar de recibirlas en días específicos de la semana. Una consecuencia de esto es que los estudiantes no se quieren comprometer a estudiar; por tanto, recibir el material de una manera menos predecible le proporciona una característica menos formal al programa. Del mismo modo, muchos estudiantes hicieron comentarios positivos sobre el formato del material de lectura corto y fácil de entender. Como la retroalimentación indicó que los estudiantes se inclinaban por temas relacionados a diferencias culturales como los chistes y proverbios, los profesores hablantes nativos del inglés articularon los componentes gramaticales y de vocabulario con estos temas.

Aunque los contenidos de las lecturas ganaron popularidad entre los estudiantes, no sucedió lo mismo con los cuestionarios de gramática pues estos recibieron menos participación que los materiales de lectura. En promedio, cada prueba de gramática tuvo solo 23 voluntarios, lo cual equivale al 11 % del total de participantes. En una entrevista con un estudiante que participó en todo el proyecto, le preguntamos por qué a los estudiantes les gustaba menos los cuestionarios en línea y respondió

Estamos cansados de tantas clases y no queremos usar el cerebro para pensar en cuestionarios después de clases. Responder cuestionarios no es como leer ensayos interesantes; no es agradable en lo absoluto. Además, nuestros profesores probablemente estén monitoreando nuestro desempeño. Sería vergonzoso si nos va mal en los cuestionarios. Por lo tanto, a menos que la conviertan en una tarea obligatoria, no quiero realizar los cuestionarios de gramática.

Esta observación sugiere que, a menos que haya un elemento de coerción en el programa, los estudiantes se resisten a realizar tareas exigentes si no se relacionan con sus calificaciones, incluso si se envían a los teléfonos móviles. La lección aquí es que los materiales de aprendizaje opcionales diseñados para los teléfonos móviles no deben ser demasiado difíciles, ya que los estudiantes pueden carecer de tiempo, energía o herramientas para realizar trabajo adicional fuera de clase que les consuma demasiado tiempo.

Discusión

La lectura en los teléfonos móviles: la motivación cuenta

La investigación sugiere que, en promedio, el 76,6 % de los estudiantes universitarios japoneses pasan más de 30 minutos al día leyendo o enviando mensajes, y el 79,5 % gasta más de 30 minutos navegando por internet desde sus teléfonos móviles (Mynavi Co. Ltd., 2012). Si una pequeña fracción de este tiempo fuera usada para leer, esto podría mejorar notablemente la capacidad lectora. Dado el alto uso de teléfonos móviles dentro de la población estudiantil, se asumió que esto tendría un efecto positivo en nuestro programa. Sin embargo, se subestimó gravemente un factor muy importante: la motivación. Teniendo en cuenta que una cantidad significativa del tiempo de los estudiantes es dedicada a la navegación y socialización en sus teléfonos móviles, es poco probable que, de repente, se cambien los hábitos de uso de estos dispositivos a actividades más gratificantes. Asimismo, si se espera algún tipo de aprendizaje con el uso de teléfonos móviles, es necesario cautivar la atención de los estudiantes a un nivel comparable al de los juegos y las redes sociales, y esto representa un gran desafío. Como ya lo hemos mencionado, hay una fuerte relación entre los teléfonos móviles y los juegos de video, y motivar a los estudiantes a usar sus teléfonos para algo tan diferente como lo es el aprendizaje, representa una tarea ambiciosa. Esto se agrava por el hecho de que la lectura en un idioma diferente al nativo es una de las habilidades más difíciles de adquirir, ya que requiere de procesos de comprensión a un alto nivel. Por tanto, el arduo trabajo necesario para mejorar, por lo menos en una medida modesta, es quizás la razón por la que muchos de los estudiantes perciben la lectura como la habilidad más difícil de desarrollar (Ngeow, 1998). Huang (2006) reconoce que la motivación del estudiante puede verse afectada cuando se está leyendo en un idioma subsecuente, pero que esto no debería impedir el proceso de aprendizaje. Huang también señaló que un factor de inminente importancia al momento de motivar estudiantes a la lectura en un idioma subsecuente es que los profesores estén disponibles para responder las preguntas. Esto abriría las posibilidades a innovaciones del aprendizaje de idiomas y tecnología de manera móvil, como el uso de mensajes instantáneos.

En el caso específico de las actividades de clase, la lectura de textos bajo el acompañamiento del docente es obligatoria y se les exige a los estudiantes responder las preguntas formuladas por el profesor. Sin embargo, para este proyecto, la participación fue voluntaria, al igual que la lectura de ensayos y el desarrollo de cuestionarios. A diferencia de la clase formal, aquí no había exámenes ni evaluaciones formales para los participantes. Los estudiantes que ingresaron a este proyecto lo hicieron voluntariamente, hecho que parece haber disminuido la participación. Solo aquellos que ya estaban altamente motivados o que estaban dirigiendo sus estudios hacia un propósito u objetivo en particular como trabajo o estudio en el extranjero, se mantuvieron muy activos en el proyecto. El reto a futuro para este estudio es encontrar la forma de atraer nuevos participantes, pero, aún más importante, mantener la motivación de aquellos registrados. Muchos estudiantes abandonaron el proyecto debido a la falta de motivación asociada a los materiales o a factores externos. Leer los materiales del proyecto puede, de alguna manera, competir con restarles tiempo de uso en redes sociales o juegos de video. Por tanto, un aspecto importante a considerar en cualquier proyecto de lectura móvil debe ser idear formas para incrementar los niveles de motivación hacia la lectura de contenidos en inglés. En segundo lugar, es posible que se deban diseñar sistemas de incentivos que puedan competir con la ya alta popularidad de las redes sociales y los juegos en los teléfonos móviles. Entrevistamos a un estudiante que participó en el proyecto todo el año de 2010, pero se retiró en 2011. Nuestra pregunta era: “¿Por qué decidió participar en el programa al principio y qué lo hizo abandonar el proceso?”. A lo que el estudiante respondió:

Al principio pensé que era obligatorio leer los ensayos. También pensé que algunas preguntas relacionadas con los materiales de aprendizaje del proyecto podrían llegar a ser incluidas en los parciales o exámenes finales. Sin embargo, me di cuenta de que no era así. De hecho, los materiales de aprendizaje enviados a mi teléfono móvil no tenían nada que ver con los créditos académicos. Los ensayos son de hecho interesantes e informativos, pero solo hacer la tarea de las clases regulares de inglés es suficiente. No tengo más energía ni tiempo para leer en mi teléfono móvil. También escuché que muchos de mis compañeros de clase no participaron y que no se vieron afectados en lo absoluto, así que decidí abandonar el proyecto también.

Este punto de vista puede representar la mayoría de los estudiantes que no quieren leer y practicar inglés en sus teléfonos móviles. No importa lo bueno que el material de lectura sea, estos estudiantes no van a estar motivados para leer en dispositivos móviles a menos que:

1. Los resultados del aprendizaje estén relacionados con un objetivo específico de un curso o que el rendimiento de los estudiantes eventualmente sea evaluado o reconocido a través de créditos académicos.

2. El progreso de aprendizaje y el rendimiento sean monitoreados formalmente. Se necesita garantizar que los estudiantes se encuentren en un espacio social con sus profesores y compañeros.

3. Se deben hacer ajustes al material a lo largo del proyecto para incorporar los comentarios y la retroalimentación de los estudiantes. Esto se puede lograr con seguimiento detallado del registro del servidor y los comentarios de los estudiantes.

La lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática en teléfonos móviles: ventajas técnicas y preocupaciones de seguridad

El uso de teléfonos móviles para la lectura y el aprendizaje de gramática presenta muchas ventajas tecnológicas. Los materiales enviados por correo electrónico se pueden almacenar en la bandeja de entrada del receptor y se puede acceder a ellos en cualquier momento. Los estudiantes pueden revisar los materiales de aprendizaje tantas veces como quieran, ya que siempre tienen sus teléfonos móviles. Con el desarrollo de la tecnología 3G, 4G y Wi-Fi para los teléfonos inteligentes, el costo de la conexión a internet está al alcance de la mayoría de los estudiantes. El concepto de aprendizaje mediado por el uso de teléfonos móviles, aunque todavía no predomina, puede llegar a ser más aceptado por los estudiantes.

Sin embargo, las desventajas del aprendizaje mediado por el uso de teléfonos móviles son todavía significativas. Como se ha venido discutiendo, los estudiantes no están acostumbrados a leer en pantallas pequeñas, responder cuestionarios que les requiera desplazarse hacia arriba y hacia abajo permanentemente; la interacción de los teléfonos móviles no es tan fácil como en los PC; y es de suma importancia entender que los estudiantes ven sus teléfonos móviles como un dominio privado que debería mantenerse aislado de la educación formal. La distinción es clara: muchos estudiantes aceptan el concepto de que el aprendizaje debe hacerse en clase o en un PC, mientras que los teléfonos móviles son para sus asuntos personales. Cambiar esta percepción requiere de un cambio de pensamiento y de una trasformación de la enseñanza. De hecho, dado el alto porcentaje de estudiantes que tienen teléfonos móviles, es increíble que los estudiantes universitarios no los utilicen como herramientas educativas. En 2012, en nuestra página de registro, preguntamos lo siguiente: “¿Alguna vez ha utilizado telefonía móvil para su aprendizaje?”; 62 estudiantes (59 %) dijeron que nunca habían utilizado su teléfono para propósitos académicos.

Otro factor develado de la retroalimentación de los estudiantes tenía que ver con la seguridad. Los estudiantes japoneses se resisten a hacer clic en un URL con el que no estén familiarizados. Temen que al hacer clic en un URL desconocido podrían generar un flujo de correos electrónicos no deseados o que los podrían llevar a sitios web poco confiables. En la entrevista con una participante, indagamos acerca de sus preocupaciones con la recepción de los materiales de aprendizaje en el teléfono móvil. A lo que respondió:

Al hacer clic en un URL desconocido a veces lo lleva uno a un mal sitio. No solo causa los mensajes de correo electrónico no deseados, sino que también se corre un alto riesgo de que te conecte a sitios potencialmente inapropiados. Así que la mayoría de nosotros somos muy cuidadosos de hacer clic en cualquier enlace sospechoso.

De hecho, en Japón, los casos de fraude por in- ternet se están convirtiendo en un grave problema ya que ha habido casos en los que personas hacen clic, sin saberlo, en un enlace web sospechoso en el trabajo o en el dominio público y han tenido situaciones vergonzosas. En los cursos de alfabetización digital se les advierte reiteradamente a los estudiantes de secundaria y universidad no dar clic en cualquier URL del que no estén seguros, ya que los virus informáticos e información personal pueden filtrarse. En consecuencia, la preocupación por la seguridad digital fue un factor significativo en el proyecto y puede explicar la baja participación en los cuestionarios de gramática.

La discusión anterior responde a la pregunta de investigación 4: los estudiantes tienen preocupaciones asociadas a la privacidad y la seguridad cuando aprenden a través de teléfonos móviles.

Conclusión

Aunque las evaluaciones cuantitativas no se llevaron a cabo anualmente, se recogieron datos objetivos a lo largo del proyecto de múltiples maneras: con los registros de inscripción, resultados de los cuestionarios, los comentarios de los estudiantes y el historial de aprendizaje almacenado en el servidor. Los datos combinados con los resultados de las entrevistas nos llevan a las siguientes conclusiones:

En general el aprendizaje asistido por la telefonía móvil se aceptó positivamente por los estudiantes como un método eficaz para mejorar la capacidad lectora y la gramática. Pero para que el aprendizaje suceda, el material debe involucrar al estudiante, sin que este sea demasiado exigente.

Para los estudiantes universitarios jóvenes, temas de lectura que tratan diferencias culturales y la vida en general son los más relevantes; por ejemplo, chistes e historias entretenidas son regularmente los favoritos. La implementación de elementos como cuestionarios de gramática debe ser minúscula para evitar que se perciba como estudio formal.

La seguridad es siempre una gran preocupación en el aprendizaje móvil. Antes de iniciar un proyecto de aprendizaje móvil, la seguridad en internet debe ser considerada cuidadosamente. Esto significa que se deben diseñar e implementar plataformas seguras de aprendizaje, modos seguros para la entrega de materiales de aprendizaje, y de monitoreo del progreso de los estudiantes.

Nuestro estudio también resalta la necesidad de empoderar a los estudiantes para que formen parte del desarrollo de materiales de aprendizaje, como estudiantes ellos conocen mejor sus propias preferencias de aprendizaje. Además, el contenido del aprendizaje móvil debe ser corto y segmentario.

Nuestros resultados también resaltan la importancia de respetar el derecho a la privacidad del estudiante. Para que un proyecto tenga un impacto significativo en los resultados del aprendizaje, debe ser muy sensible a los comentarios tanto positivos como negativos. Por último, para poder competir con la ubicuidad de los juegos y redes sociales, es necesario diseñar un sistema de incentivos. Sin embargo, creemos que tener incentivos no es la solución, que el aprendizaje siempre debe ser entendido como su la recompensa misma. Sin embargo, la articulación del aprendizaje móvil con la evaluación formal de un curso puede contribuir a la eficacia del aprendizaje móvil.

Esperamos que este estudio llame la atención de otros practicantes del aprendizaje móvil para expandir esta cultura. Al trabajar en cooperación con los estudiantes, las instituciones educativas pueden construir un programa de aprendizaje móvil eficaz que progresivamente ubique a los estudiantes a la vanguardia.

Limitaciones de la investigación y trabajos futuros

Mientras que nuestras conclusiones se derivan de la combinación de interpretaciones subjetivas (encuestas y entrevistas) y datos objetivos (registros del servidor y los resultados de los juegos de pregunta de gramática), somos conscientes de que esta investigación tiene limitaciones.

En primer lugar, los participantes del proyecto fueron, en su mayoría, estudiantes de primer año, lo cual puede no representar completamente el estilo y las preferencias de aprendizaje móvil de todos los estudiantes universitarios.

En segundo lugar, la medición de la eficacia del aprendizaje de lectura y de gramática podría haber sido sometido a una evaluación experimental más riguroso. En su lugar, derivamos nuestros resultados de las percepciones de los estudiantes y de los registros del servidor, los cuales pueden llegar a no ser indicadores de mejora tan fiables como lo son los exámenes.

En tercer lugar, debido a las regulaciones de derechos de autor, este proyecto utiliza materiales hechos en casa en vez de textos auténticos o textos auténticos abreviados. Para reflejar las diferentes preferencias de los estudiantes, podría ser mejor recurrir a una mezcla de material auténtico y de material hecho en casa.

En respuesta a estas limitaciones, tenemos previsto ampliar nuestro proyecto para incluir estudiantes de niveles superiores e integrar materiales de aprendizaje auténticos. A partir de 2013, los resultados del aprendizaje de todos los estudiantes serán evaluados a través de exámenes estándar que se puedan incorporar en nuestros datos para su análisis posterior.


Referencias bibliográficas

Borau, K., Ullrich, C., Feng, J., & Shen, R. (2009). Mi- croblogging for language learning: Using Twitter to train communicative and cultural competence. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 5686, 78–87.

Boston, J. (2009). Social presence, self-presentation, and privacy in tele-collaboration: What information are students willing to share? Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology, 5(3), 29–44. Re- trieved from http://rcetj.org/index.php/rcetj/article/ view/64/128

Burston, J. (2011). Exploiting the pedagogical potential of MALL. In Proceedings of Mobile Learning as the future of education. San Sebastián, Spain. Retrieved from http://www.moblang.mobi/conference/files/PedagogicalAspectsOfMobileLearning_MobLang_ JackBurston.pdf

Butgereit, L., & Botha, A. (2009). The noisy way to practice spelling vocabulary using a cell phone. In P. Cunningham and M. Cunningham (Eds.), IST-Africa 2009 Conference Proceedings, (pp.1– 7). Kampala, Uganda: International Information Management Corporation.

Cavus, N., & Ibrahim, D. (2009). m-Learning: An ex- periment in using SMS to support learning new English language words. British Journal of Educa- tional Technology, 40(1), 78–91.

Chang, C-K., & Hsu, C-K. (2011). A mobile-assisted synchronously collaborative translation–annotation system for English as a foreign language (EFL) reading comprehension. The Journal of Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(2), 155–180.

Chen, C-M., & Chung, C-J. (2008). Personalized mobile English vocabulary learning system based on item response theory and learning memory cycle. Computers and Education, 51, 624–645.

Cheon J., Lee S., Crooks S., & Song, J. (2012). An investigation of mobile learning readiness in higher education based on the theory of plan- ned behavior. Computers and Education, 59(3), 1054–1064.

Comas-Quinn, A., & Mardomingo, R. (2009). Mobile blogs in language learning: Making the most of informal and situated learning opportunities. Re- CALL, 21(1), 96–112.

Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: Teaching the crafts of rea- ding, writing, and mathematics. In I,. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction (pp. 453– 494). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Day, R., & Bamford, J. (1998). Extensive reading in the second language classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Demouy, V., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2010). On the spot: Using mobile devices for listening and speaking practice on a French language programme. The Journal of Open Distance and e-Learning, 25(3), 217–232.

El-Khatib, K., Korba, L., & Yee, G. (2003). Privacy and security in e-learning. Journal of Distance Educa- tion, 1(4), 1–16.

Farrar, L. (2009, February 26). Cell phone stories writing new chapter in print publishing. CNN. Retrieved from http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/02/25/japan.mobilenovels/index.html

Fiorea, S., Cuevasa, H., & Oserb, R. (2003). A pictu- re is worth a thousand connections: The facilitative effects of diagrams on mental model development and task performance. Computers in Human Behavior, 19(2), 185–199.

Glenberg, M., & Langston, W. (1992). Comprehension of illustrated text: Pictures help to build mental models. Journal of Memory and Language. 31(2), 129–151.

Grosseck, G., & Holotesch, C. (2008). Can we use Twitter for educational activities? Paper presented at the Fourth International Scientific Conference eLearning and Software for Education, Bucharest, Romania.

Heffernan, N., & Wang, S. (2008). Copyright and multi- media classroom material: A study from Japan. The Journal of Computer Assisted Language Learning, 21(2), 167–180.

Holbrook, A., Krosnick, J., & Alison, P. (2008). The causes and consequences of response rates in surveys by the news Media and government contractor sur- vey research firms. In J. M. Lepkowski, N. C. Tucker,

J. M. Brick, E. D. de Leeuw, L. Japec, P. J. Lavrakas, …, & M. W. Link (Eds.) Advances in telephone sur- vey methodology, pp. 499–528. New York, NY: Wiley. Huang, L., & Lin, C. (2011). EFL learners' reading on mobile phones. The JALT CALL Journal 7(1), 61–78.

Huang, S. (2006). Reading English for academic purpo- ses: What situational factors may motivate learners to read? System, 34, 371–383.

Japan Copyright Office (2011). Copyright systems in Ja- pan. Retrieved from http://www.cric.or.jp/cric_e/ csj/csj.html

Kawaharazuka, M., & Takeuchi, K. (2010). Considering the cell-phone novel (Keitai Shousetsu). Ochanomizu University Web Library - Institutional Repository. Retrieved from http://teapot.lib.ocha.ac.jp/ocha/bitstream/10083/49269/1/35_131-138.pdf

Kennedy, C., & Levy, M. (2008). L'italiano al telefonino: Using SMS to support beginners' language learning. ReCALL, 20(3), 315–330.

Kimura, T., Komatsu, Y., Shimagawa, S., Shirahase, F., & Sekine, M. (2005). Nerawareru! Kojinyohou p higaikyousai no houritsu to jitsu [Personal data, privacy and their violation: Law support and cases]. Tokyo, Japan: Civil Law Research Association.

Koskinen, P., Blum, I., Bisson, S., Phillips, S., Creamer, T., & Baker, K. (2000). Book access, shared rea- ding, and audio models: The effects of supporting the literacy learning of linguistically diverse students in school and at home. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92(1), 23–36.

Krashen, S. (1989). We acquire vocabulary and spelling by reading: Additional evidence for the input hypothesis. Modern Language Journal, 73, 440–464.

Lan, Y., Sung, Y., & Chang, K. (2007). A mobile-device supported peer-assisted learning system for colla- borative early EFL reading. Language Learning & Technology, 11(3), 130–151. Retrieved from: http:// llt.msu.edu/vol11num3/pdf/lansungchang.pdf

Lu, M. (2008). Effectiveness of vocabulary learning via mobile phone. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 24(6), 515–525.

MyNavi Co. Ltd. (2012). Lifestyle survey on 2013 university graduates. Retrieved from http://saponet.mynavi.jp/mynavienq/data/mynavienq_20120124.pdf

Ngeow, K. (1998). Motivation and transfer in language learning. ERIC Digest. Retrieved from http://www.ericdigests.org/1999-4/motivation.htm

Oxford, R., & Shearin, J. (1994). Language learning motivation: Expanding the theoretical framework. The Modern Language Journal, 78(1), 12–28.

Pincas, A. (2004). Using mobile support for use of Greek during the Olympic Games 2004. In Proceedings of M-Learn Conference 2004. Rome, Italy: Learning and Skills Development Agency.

Rutherford, W. (1987). Second language grammar: Learning and teaching. New York, NY: Longman.

Stockwell, G. (2008). Investigating learner preparedness for and usage patterns of mobile learning. ReCALL, 20(3), 253–270.

Stockwell, G. (2010). Using mobile phones for vocabulary activities: Examining the effect of the platform. Language Learning & Technology, 14(2), 95–110. Retrieved from: http://llt.msu.edu/vol14num2/stockwell. pdf

Takase, A. (2003). Effects of eliminating some demotivating factors in reading English extensively. JALT 2003 Conference Proceedings (pp.95–103). Shizuoka, Japan: JALT.

Taylor, D., Drummond, C. & Strang, C. (1997). Surveying general practitioners: does a low response ra- te matter? The British Journal of General Practice, 47(415), 91–94.

The Cabinet Office of the Japanese Government. (2005). Act on the protection of personal information. Re- trieved from http://www.cas.go.jp/jp/seisaku/hourei/ data/APPI.pdf

The Cabinet Office of the Japanese Government. (2011). Survey result of Internet use of Japanese teenagers. Retrieved from http://www8.cao.go.jp/youth/youth- harm/chousa/h23/net-jittai/pdf/kekka_g.pdf

Thornton, P., & Houser, C. (2005). Using mobile phones in English education in Japan. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 21, 217–228.

Wang, S., & Heffernan, N. (2010). Ethical issues in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Perception should be in place s of teachers and learners. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(5), 796–813.

Wang, S. & Higgins, M. (2006). Limitations of mobile phone learning. The JALT CALL Journal, 2(1), 3–14.

Warshauer, M. (1997). Computer-mediated collaborati- ve learning: Theory and practice. Modern Language Journal, 81(4), 470–481.

Waycott, J., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2003). Students' ex- periences with PDAs for reading course materials. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 7(1), 30–43. doi: 10.1007/s00779-002-0211x

Yamaguchi, T. (2005). Vocabulary learning with a mobile phone. Program of the 10th Anniversary Conferen- ce of Pan-Pacific Association of Applied Linguistics. Edinburgh, UK


Apéndice. Encuesta sobre el estudio de la lectura y la escritura en teléfonos móviles (n = 56)