DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/22486798.16908

Publicado:

2021-05-21

Número:

Vol. 26 (2021): Escritura e identidad (número especial)

Sección:

Debates actuales en el estudio de las prácticas de escritura

Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración

Society through the lens of language: a new look at social groups and integration

Autores/as

  • Jan Blommaert Tilburg University

Palabras clave:

sociolingüística de las interacciones en línea, interfaz online/offline, producción de identidad, patrones de interacción social, teoría social, prácticas multimodales (es).

Palabras clave:

online sociolinguistics, social theory, multimodal practices, online/offline interface, identity performance, patterns of social interaction (en).

Referencias

Androutsopoulos, J. (2016). Theorizing media, mediation and mediatization. En N. Coupland (ed.), Sociolinguistics: Theoretical debates (pp. 282-302). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at large: Cultural dimensions of globalization. Mineápolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Arnaut, K. (2016). Superdiversity: Elements of an emerging perspective. En K. Arnaut, J. Blommaert, B. Rampton y M. Spotti (eds.), Language and superdiversity (pp. 49-70). Nueva York: Routledge.

Arnaut, K., Karrebaek, M. S. y Spotti, M. (2017). The poeieisis-infrastructures nexus and language practices in combinatorial spaces. En K. Arnaut, J. Blommaert, M. S. Karrebaek y M. Spotti (eds.), Engaging superdiversity: Recombining spaces, times, and language practices (pp. 3-24). Brístol: Multilingual Matters.

Baron, N. (2008). Always on: Language in an online and mobile world. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bauman, Z. (1996). Tourists and vagabonds: Heroes and victims of postmodernity. Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna, Political Science Series, 30. Recuperado de http://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/26687/ssoar-1996-baumanntourists_and_vagabonds.pdf?sequence=1

Becker, H., Geer, B., Hughes, E. y Strauss, A. (1961). Boys in white: Student culture in medical school. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Blommaert, J. (2010). The sociolinguistics of globalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Blommaert, J. (2015a). Meaning as a nonlinear effect: The birth of cool. AILA Review, 28, 7-27.

Blommaert, J. (2015b). Pierre Bourdieu: Perspectives on language in society. En J.-O. Östman y J. Verschueren (eds.), Handbook of pragmatics 2015 (pp. 1-16). Ámsterdam: John Benjamins.

Blommaert, J. (2016). “Meeting of styles” and the online infrastructures of graffiti. Applied Linguistics Review, 7(2), 99-115.

Blommaert, J. (2017). Durkheim and the internet: On sociolinguistics and the sociological imagination. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 173. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/babylon/tpcs/itempaper-173-tpcs.htm

Blommaert, J. y De Fina, A. (2017). Chronotopic identities: On the timespace organization of who we are. En A. de Fina, J. Wegner y D. Ikizoglu (eds.), Diversity and super-diversity. Sociocultural linguistic perspectives. Washington D. C.: Georgetown University Press.

Blommaert, J. y Rampton, B. (2016). Language and superdiversity. En K. Arnaut, J. Blommaert, B. Rampton y M. Spotti (Eds.). Language and superdiversity (pp. 21-48). Nueva York: Routledge.

Blommaert, J. y Varis, P. (2015). Enoughness, accent, and light communities: Essays on contemporary identities. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 139. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/babylon/tpcs/item-paper-139-tpcs.htm

Blommaert, J. y Verschueren, J. (1998). Debating diversity: Analysing the discourse of tolerance. Londres: Routledge.

Blumer, H. (1969). Symbolic interactionism: Perspectives and method. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.

Bourdieu, P. y Passeron, J.-C. (1964 [1985]). Les héritiers: les étudiants et la culture. París: Minuit.

boyd, D. (2011). White flight in networked publics? How race and class shaped American teen engagement with MySpace and Facebook. En L. Nakamura y P. Chow-White (eds.), Race after the Internet (pp. 203-222). Nueva York: Routledge.

boyd, D. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Brandehof, J. (2014). Superdiversity in a cameroonian diaspora community in Ghent: The social structure of superdiverse networks. [MA dissertation]. Tilburg University, Países Bajos. (Sin publicar).

Brevini, B., Hintz, A. y McCurdy, P. (eds.). (2013). Beyond Wikileaks: Implications for the future of communications, journalism, and society. Londres: Palgrave Macmillan.

Castells, M. (1996). The rise of the network society. Londres: Blackwell.

Collins, R. (1981). On the microfoundations of macrosociology. American Journal of Sociology, 86(5), 984-1014.

Coupland, N. (ed.). (2016). Sociolinguistics: Theoretical debates. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Du, C. (2016). The birth of social class online: The Chinese precariat on the internet. [PhD Dissertation]. Tilburg University, Países Bajos.

Faudree, P. (2016). Singing for the dead on and offline: Diversity, migration and scale in Mexican Muertos music. Language & Communication, 44, 31-43.

Fox, S. y Sharma, D. (2016). The language of London and Londoners. Working Papers in Urban Language and Literacies, 201. Recuperado de https://www.academia.edu/29025532/WP201_Fox_and_Sharma_2016._The_language_of_London_and_Londoners

Glaser, B. y Strauss, A. (1967). The discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for qualitative research. Chicago: Aldine.

Goebel, Z. (2015). Language and superdiversity: Indonesians knowledging home and abroad. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Goffman, E. (1961). Encounters: Two studies in the sociology of interaction. Nueva York: Bobbs-Merrill.

Goffman, E. (1971). Relations in public: Microstudies of the public order. Nueva York: Basic Books.

Graeber, D. (2009). Direct action: An ethnography. Edimburgo: AK Press.

Gumperz, J. (1982). Discourse strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hanell, L. y Salö, L. (2015). “That’s weird, my obgyn said the exact opposite!” Discourse and

knowledge in an online discussion forum thread for expecting parents. Tilburg Papers in Cultural Studies, 125. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/dc6b8024-c200-4dbd-8bdb-bd684aa636c0_TPCS_125_Hanell-Salo.pdf

Harris, R. (2006). New ethnicities and language use. Londres: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hobsbawm, E. (1987). The age of empire, 1875-1914. Londres: Weidenfeld & Nicholson.

Hymes, D. (1996). Ethnography, linguistics, narrative inequality: Toward an understanding of voice. Londres: Taylor & Francis.

Jewitt, C. (2013). Multimodal methods for researching digital technologies. En S. Price, C. Jewitt y B. Brown (eds.), The Sage handbook of digital technology research (pp. 250-265). Los Ángeles: Sage.

Jones, G. (2014). Reported speech as an authentication tactic in computer-mediated communication. En V. Lacoste, J. Leimgruber y T. Breier (eds.), Indexing authenticity: Sociolinguistic perspectives (pp. 188-208). Berlín: De Gruyter.

Jörgensen, J. N. (2008). Languaging: Nine years of poly-lingual development of young turkish-danis grade school students. Copenhague: University of Copenhagen Faculty of Humanities.

Kress, G. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. Londres: Routledge.

Kytölä, S. (2013). Multilingual language use and metapragmatic reflexivity in Finnish internet football forums: A study in the sociolinguistics of globalization. [PhD dissertation]. University of Jyväskylä, Finlandia.

Kytölä, S. y Westinen, E. (2015). “Chocolate munching wanabee rapper, you’re out”: A finnish footballer’s Twitter writing as the focus of metapragmatic debates. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 128. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/6f479b83-f64d-48d4-bb6c-988e15935c71_TPCS_128_Kytola-Westinen.pdf

Lave, J. y Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Leppänen, S. (2007). Youth language in media contexts: Insights into the function of English in Finland. World Englishes, 26(2), 149-169.

Leppänen, S. y Peuronen, S. (2012). Multilingualism on the Internet. En M. Martoin-Jones, A. Blackledge y A. Creese (eds.), Handbook of multilingualism (pp. 384-402). Londres: Routledge.

Leppänen, S., Westinen, E. y Kytölä, S. (eds.) (2017). Social media discourse, (dis)identifications and diversities. Londres: Routledge.

Li, K., Spotti, M. y Kroon, S. (2014). An e-ethnography of baifumei on the Baidu Tieba: Investigating an emerging economy of identification online. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 120. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/c7982626-e1a6-40a8-9334-9fba945ac568_TPCS_120_Kunming-Spotti-Kroon.pdf

Maly, I. (2016). How did Trump get this far? Explaining Trumps message. Diggit Magazine. Recuperado de https://www.diggitmagazine.com/articles/how-did-trump-get-far

Maly, I. y Varis, P. (2015). The 21st-century hipster: On micro-populations in times of superdiversity. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 19(6), 1-17.

McCaughey, M. y Ayers, M. (eds.) (2003). Cyberactivism: Online activism in theory and practice. Nueva York: Routledge.

Mendoza-Denton, N. (2015). Gangs on YouTube: Localism, Spanish/English variation, and music fandom. Working Papers in Urban Language and Literacies, 157. Recuperado de https://www.academia.edu/11599619/WP157_Mendoza-Denton_2015._Gangs_on_YouTube_Localism_Spanish_English_variation_and_music_fandom

Miller, V. (2008). New media, networking and phatic culture. Convergence, 14, 387-400.

Mills, C. W. (1951). White collar: The American middle classes. Nueva York: Oxford University Press.

Mills, C. W. (1959 [2000]). The sociological imagination. Nueva York: Oxford University Press

Nemcova, M. (2016). Rethinking integration: Superdiversity in the networks of transnational individuals. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 167. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/d1833428-a654-4a72-aefc-be19edeea82d_TPCS_167_Nemcova.pdf

Page, R. (2012). Stories and social media: Identities and interaction. Londres: Routledge. Parsons, T. (1964). Social structure and personality. Nueva York: Free Press.

Parsons, T. (2007). American society: A theory of the societal community. Boulder: Paradigm Press.

Popper, K. (1976). The logic of the social sciences. En T. Adorno, H. Albert, R. Dahrendorf, J. Habermas, H. Pilot y K. Popper, The positivist dispute in German sociology (pp. 87-104). Nueva York: Harper & Row.

Rampton, B. (2006). Language in late modernity: Interactions in an urban school. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sierra, S. (2016). Playing out loud: Videogame references as resources in friend interaction for managing frames, epistemics, and group identity. Language in Society, 45, 217-245.

Simmel, G. (1950). The sociology of Georg Simmel. Glencoe: The Free Press.

Standing, G. (2011). The precariat: The new dangerous class. Londres: Bloomsbury.

Tall, S. M. (2004). Senegalese émigrés: New information and communication technologies. Review of African Political Economy, 99, 31-48.

Toma, C. (2016). Online dating. En C. Berger y M. Roloff (Eds.). The international encyclopaedia of interpersonal communication (pp. 1-5). Nueva York: Wiley.

Van Nuenen, T. (2016). Scripted journeys: A study of interfaced travel writing. [PhD Dissertation]. Tilburg University, Países Bajos.

Varis, P. y Blommaert, J. (2013). Conviviality and collectives on social media: Virality, memes, and new social structures. Multilingual Margins, 2(1), 31-45.

Varis, P. y Van Nuenen, T. (2017). The internet, language, and virtual interactions. En O. Garcia, N. Flores y Spotti M. (eds.), The Oxford handbook of language and society (pp. 473-488). Nueva York: Oxford University Press.

Velghe, F. (2013). “Hallo, hoe gaan dit, wat maak jy?” Phatic communication, the mobile phone and coping strategies in a South African context. Multilingual Margins, 2(1), 10-30.

Wallerstein, I. (1983). Historical capitalism. Londres: Verso.

Wang, X. (2015). Inauthentic authenticity: Semiotic design and globalization in the margins of China. Semiotica, 203, 227-248.

Williams, G. (1992). Sociolinguistics: A sociological critique. Londres: Longman.

Yang P., Tang, L. y Wang, X. (2015). Diaosi as infrapolitics: Scatological tropes, identity-making and cultural intimacy on China’s internet. Media, Culture and Society, 37(2), 197-214.

Cómo citar

APA

Blommaert, J. (2021). Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración. Enunciación, 26, 37–54. https://doi.org/10.14483/22486798.16908

ACM

[1]
Blommaert, J. 2021. Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración. Enunciación. 26, (may 2021), 37–54. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/22486798.16908.

ACS

(1)
Blommaert, J. Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración. Enunciación 2021, 26, 37-54.

ABNT

BLOMMAERT, J. Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración. Enunciación, [S. l.], v. 26, p. 37–54, 2021. DOI: 10.14483/22486798.16908. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/enunc/article/view/16908. Acesso em: 27 sep. 2021.

Chicago

Blommaert, Jan. 2021. «Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración». Enunciación 26 (mayo):37-54. https://doi.org/10.14483/22486798.16908.

Harvard

Blommaert, J. (2021) «Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración», Enunciación, 26, pp. 37–54. doi: 10.14483/22486798.16908.

IEEE

[1]
J. Blommaert, «Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración», Enunciación, vol. 26, pp. 37–54, may 2021.

MLA

Blommaert, J. «Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración». Enunciación, vol. 26, mayo de 2021, pp. 37-54, doi:10.14483/22486798.16908.

Turabian

Blommaert, Jan. «Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración». Enunciación 26 (mayo 21, 2021): 37–54. Accedido septiembre 27, 2021. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/enunc/article/view/16908.

Vancouver

1.
Blommaert J. Comprender la sociedad a través del lenguaje: una nueva mirada sobre los grupos sociales y la integración. Enunciación [Internet]. 21 de mayo de 2021 [citado 27 de septiembre de 2021];26:37-54. Disponible en: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/enunc/article/view/16908

Descargar cita

Visitas

354

Dimensions


PlumX


Descargas

Los datos de descargas todavía no están disponibles.

Recibido: 20 de julio de 2020; Aceptado: 27 de agosto de 2020

Resumen

En este ensayo, el lingüista belga Jan Blommaert postula que el sustento empírico de la sociolingüística y su foco en la descripción de los patrones de interacción de las comunidades pueden aportar al enriquecimiento y el ajuste de la teoría social en general. En particular, Blommaert revisa los principios clásicos –así como las visiones no convencionales– de la teoría de los grupos sociales y la teoría de la integración social, para proponer innovaciones a partir de los hallazgos de investigaciones sociolingüísticas centradas en la articulación entre las interacciones online y offline, y los efectos identitarios que desencadenan. En relación con los grupos sociales, sostiene la existencia de grupos livianos en simultaneidad con los grupos sólidos (clases, etnias) de las teorías clásicas, y lo ilustra a partir de diversas investigaciones que dan cuenta de prácticas multimodales livianas (como la escritura en redes) que producen formas de cohesión social. Por otra parte, plantea que la teoría de la integración social clásica, basada en la idea de la completa incorporación del inmigrante a una única sociedad receptora, debe ser renovada a la luz de los nuevos modos de integración en contextos de diáspora que las TIC promueven. Para fundamentar esta hipótesis, revisa investigaciones que analizan grados de integración de las personas en muy diversas comunidades con cuyos miembros interactúan desplegando repertorios comunicativos superdiversos. Ambos desarrollos permiten al autor afirmar el aporte de las herramientas y los conceptos de la sociolingüística anclada en el análisis empírico de interacciones y prácticas de literacidad multimodales para describir los procesos, formaciones y estructuras que constituyen el objeto de las ciencias sociales.

Palabras clave

sociolingüística de las interacciones en línea, teoría social, prácticas multimodales, interfaz online.offline , producción de identidad, patrones de interacción social.

Abstract

In this essay, Belgian sociolinguist Jan Blommaert holds that the empirical base of sociolinguistics, as well as its focus on interaction patterns within communities, can be a rich source for new theoretical directions in social sciences and humanities. Specifically, Blommaert discusses classic – and also less conventional- conceptualizations of the theory of social groups and the theory of social integration to point out the need for innovation based on the insights from sociolinguistic research focusing on online/ offline interactions and the identity effects they trigger. Firstly, the article highlights the need to study “light” social groups along with the “solid” groups (defined by features such as class or ethnicity) of classical sociological theory, illustrating this with reference to research on light multimodal practices (such as network literacy) which lead to new contemporary forms of social cohesion. Secondly, it suggests that classic views of social integration, entailing immigrants’ full integration into their host community, should be reconsidered in the light of new modes of integration in diasporic contexts enabled by new information technologies. To support this claim, Blommaert draws on research showing immigrants’ various degrees of integration in different communities located across the world, achieved through a wide range of technological devices and superdiverse communicative repertoires. These two arguments confirm, in the author’s view, the potential of contemporary sociolinguistics –firmly grounded on empirical analyses of multimodal practices and interactions- to describe the processes, formations and structures that constitute the object of social sciences.

Keywords

online sociolinguistics, social theory, multimodal practices, online/offline interface, identity performance, patterns of social interaction.

Introducción

Hay aspectos de la actividad científica que no son habitualmente desarrollados por los sociolingüistas, y uno de ellos es la construcción autoconsciente de teoría [1] . Los sociolingüistas, a grandes rasgos, parecen compartir una percepción de sí mismos como analistas firmemente anclados en lo empírico, dedicados a la exploración rigurosa de detalles sociolingüísticos y patrones en los que estos pueden ser comprendidos. En esos ejercicios, si bien pueden desarrollarse constructos, conceptos y categorías teóricas –y esto sucede frecuentemente–, en general, esos constructos, conceptos y categorías se presentan como válidos únicamente dentro del campo de la sociolingüística, dejando a otros la tarea de extrapolarlos hacia una teoría social más amplia [2] .

Sin embargo, esos otros casi nunca hacen esa extrapolación. Salvo en contadas excepciones, los sociólogos tradicionales se han negado a prestar atención a aquello que ellos mismos ven como definitorio de la vida social: la interacción humana. En 1969, Herbert Blumer (una de esas excepciones) sintetizaba el campo de la siguiente manera:

[...] una sociedad consiste en individuos que interactúan entre sí. Las actividades de los miembros se producen predominantemente en respuesta a otros o en relación con otros. Aunque esto es casi universalmente reconocido en las definiciones de la sociedad humana, la interacción social usualmente se da por sentada y se la trata como si tuviera poca o ninguna importancia en sí misma. (Blumer, 1969, p. 7)

El efecto es que una gran parte de la famosa imaginación sociológica [3] de C. Wright Mills (1959) se basa en visiones abstractas y frecuentemente idealizadas de los patrones de interacción social que no tienen los pies sobre la tierra, por así decirlo. Y recíprocamente, estas visiones abstractas e idealizadas, ahora convertidas en conceptos y categorías teóricas, son transferidas, como lo ha observado Glyn Williams (1992), a la sociolingüística tradicional, para –recién en ese momento– darse de bruces con resultados empíricos que, en muchos casos, matizan sustancialmente los modelos y, en otros, incluso los contradicen abiertamente. Este potencial de la sociolingüística para reajustar la teoría social, o incluso para crearla, sigue siendo infravalorado.

La tesis central de este ensayo es que los sociolingüistas son –nos guste o no– un tipo especializado

de sociólogos, que observan la sociedad a través de las lentes del lenguaje y de la interacción. Esta última es un objeto sociológico sui géneris con una inmediatez y una precisión únicas para analizar empíricamente la dinámica de la vida social: todo espacio y todo evento social se caracteriza por patrones de interacción que le son específicos y los cambios en esos espacios se manifiestan en el comportamiento interaccional mucho antes de que se evidencien en las estadísticas. En ese sentido, concibo a la sociolingüística contemporánea avanzada como un instrumento de confirmación empírica de datos para otras ciencias sociales y humanas, y como una potente fuente de hipótesis (en otras palabras, teorías) innovadoras y con base empírica, de relevancia general.

Ofreceré dos ilustraciones del potencial de la sociolingüística contemporánea como fuente de nuevas direcciones teóricas en las ciencias sociales en general. Ambas son –por supuesto– tentativas y exploratorias; sin embargo, se apoyan firmemente en una cantidad considerable de evidencia sociolingüística y por tanto son, para usar el ya clásico término de Glaser y Strauss (1967), teorías fundamentadas. En primer lugar, mostraré cómo la investigación sociolingüística actual puede arrojar nuevas luces sobre un problema conceptual antiguo y persistente en la sociología: el de la definición y delimitación de grupos sociales. La segunda propuesta se relaciona con lo anterior: en la sociología tradicional (en especial en la tradición durkheimiana y parsoniana), la integración social se considera esencial para comprender el desarrollo de las sociedades y los grupos sociales incluidos en ellas. Propongo que la conceptualización tanto de la integración social como de los grupos sociales puede ser mejorada de manera significativa si se apela a los hallazgos procedentes del estudio sociolingüístico de la interfaz online/offline(en línea/fuera de línea) [4] . Permítanme ofrecer algunas observaciones sobre esto último.

Una teorización del mundo social online. offline

La teoría social más conocida tiene sus orígenes en el siglo XX y evidencia diferentes intentos de dar sentido a un tipo concreto (o, más bien, ideal) de sociedad. Esto significa: una sociedad caracterizada por determinados tipos de población; relaciones socioculturales, económicas y políticas e identidades que de ellas derivan; instituciones y otras formas de infraestructura sociocultural, económica y política. Una sociedad que, debido a todas esas características, es propensa a determinadas líneas de desarrollo que tienden a generar formas específicas de poder, conflicto y desigualdad, pero también formas de cultura, felicidad y autoconfianza. Ahora bien, mi próxima frase puede parecer una obviedad: las sociedades que eran objeto de tales esfuerzos teóricos eran sociedades preinternet, sociedades offline, como las llamaríamos actualmente. La primera generación de sociolingüistas también se enfrentaba con una sociedad en la que los patrones de interacción social eran offline y en la que los patrones de sociabilidad generados por esos modos de interacción tenían un carácter tangible, no virtual, basado de la copresencia espaciotemporal. John Gumperz no analizó las interacciones en Facebook, debido a la inexistencia de Facebook.

Mirando hacia atrás, después de más de dos décadas, el trabajo de Manuel Castells (1996) y de Arjun Appadurai (1996), no podemos dejar de sorprendernos de la agudeza de su capacidad de anticipación. Ambos fueron vistos, en su momento, como teóricos de la globalización. La globalización, ciertamente, tuvo un fuerte ascenso como tema de investigación después del final de la Guerra Fría; no –debe subrayarse– porque la globalización fuera un fenómeno nuevo (el mundo ya estaba efectivamente globalizado a fines del siglo XIX y algunos aspectos importantes de la globalización existían desde mucho antes; ver Wallerstein, 1983; Hobsbawm, 1987), sino porque la globalización había adquirido una infraestructura de tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) de un poder, impacto y alcance sin precedentes, posibilitando la compresión espaciotemporal, los saltos de escala de lo local a lo global y una economía del conocimiento descentralizada, en la que las aplicaciones de internet ingresaban (como commodities generalizadas) en la vida institucional y cotidiana a un ritmo vertiginoso.

Los efectos de las TIC en la sociedad y la vida social en todos sus aspectos llevaron a Castells y a Appadurai a considerar su era como una etapa de discontinuidad histórica, incluso de cambio revolucionario, dado que la trama social misma y la naturaleza de su dinámica social se habían alterado profundamente. Desde la perspectiva de Appadurai (1996), habíamos entrado en otro tipo de modernidad, que denominó globalización vernácula [5] .

La megarretórica de la modernización desarrollista [...] en muchos países aún nos acompaña. Pero en muchos casos está matizada, interrogada y domesticada por las micronarrativas del cine, la televisión, la música y otras formas de expresión, que permiten que la modernización se reescriba más como una globalización vernácula y menos como una concesión a las políticas nacionales e internacionales de gran escala. (p. 10)

Debido a la rápida expansión de las nuevas TIC, Appadurai (1996) señaló la existencia de “nuevas formas de desfase entre los vecindarios espaciales y virtuales” (p. 194), que complejizan seriamente el significado que puede adquirir un término como práctica local; asimismo, anticipó el surgimiento de esferas públicas diaspóricas que revelarían nuevos horizontes para la acción política y social, hasta entonces confinadas en el interior del Estado-nación (p. 22). Por su parte, Castells (1996) describió el enorme efecto de las nuevas TIC en los procesos económicos y políticos, la organización del trabajo, la producción de identidades y la organización social. Castells predijo el desarrollo de un nuevo tipo de formación social que llamó red y que no estaba limitada por las fronteras tradicionales de los grupos sociales. Ambos avizoraron un nuevo y complejo orden sociocultural, político y económico en proceso de gestación, e invitaron a otros a sumarse a la descripción y teorización de estos cambios. Algunos de quienes respondieron a ese llamado eran sociolingüistas.

Desde entonces, la sociolingüística de las interacciones en línea (online sociolinguistics) ha aportado considerablemente a la comprensión tanto de nuevas formas de interacción social online como de los efectos identitarios que estas desencadenan, que resaltaré brevemente (para revisiones del campo, ver Leppänen y Peuronen, 2012; Androutsopoulos, 2016; Varis y Van Nuenen, 2017; Leppänen, Westinen y Kytölä, 2017).

1. En líneas generales, el surgimiento de la comunicación online como un aspecto de la vida cotidiana ha aumentado enormemente la importancia de la literacidad y, más específicamente, de la literacidad multimodal. La comunicación online es casi en su totalidad escrita (o diseñada: Kress, 2003; Jewitt, 2013). La escritura, como sabemos, es un campo de normatividad que se estructura de manera muy diferente del discurso oral –los errores de escritura son tratados con una tolerancia bastante menor que los errores en el habla–, pero, al mismo tiempo, las prácticas de escritura online despliegan un notable dinamismo y una tendencia a la innovación que desplazan las fronteras tradicionales de lo escrito (y evidentemente, las de la lengua en su sentido tradicional). Pensemos en el uso, hoy extendido, de emoticones y expresiones como “OMG” y “LOL”, en la influencia del registro del hiphop basado en el AAVE en los nuevos géneros de comunicación online y en dispositivos móviles (Kytölä y Westinen, 2015) [6] ; en las complejas imbricaciones de recursos visuales, textuales, estáticos y dinámicos de los sitios web contemporáneos y, especialmente, en el fenómeno de los memes (Du, 2016; Blommaert, 2015a). Las personas hacen cosas muy distintas en –y con– el material semiótico cuando están online, en comparación con lo que hacen en contextos offline.

2. Mucho de lo que se hace, especialmente en las redes sociales, parece ser lo que se conoce como comunión fática: la transmisión y el intercambio de mensajes en los que la importancia central está no en el contenido proposicional (la información), sino en el mantenimiento de las relaciones sociales conviviales y la realización de determinados actos de identidad; por ejemplo, ser amigo en Facebook a través de un “Me gusta”, “seguidor” a través de retuiteos de Twitter o, simplemente, “conocido” a través de mensajes de celular breves y rápidos (Miller, 2008; Jones, 2014; Varis y Blommaert, 2013; Velghe, 2013).

3. Las fronteras entre los procesos sociales online y offline son porosas. Los registros propios de las actividades online, como los juegos masivos online, pueden permear el léxico cotidiano de los jugadores (gamers) y transformarse en nuevos recursos indexicales para expresar lazos sociales (Sierra, 2016), así como las actividades online pueden convertirse en un entorno de aprendizaje donde se construyen y circulan recursos que en la actualidad también tienen una influencia profunda en las prácticas offline (Leppänen, 2007; Maly y Varis, 2015; Blommaert, 2016). Inversamente, las características de las identidades offline pueden incidir en la elección y el uso de determinadas plataformas online y modos de conducta específicos (boyd, 2011). Y, por supuesto, fenómenos nuevos como las citas online están destinados a salir offline en cuanto se han dado los primeros pasos online (Toma, 2016). Además, internet se ha transformado en un enorme repositorio de material explícitamente didáctico y normativo –el género del tutorial– en el que las personas pueden obtener instrucciones claras para performar determinadas formas de identidad (Blommaert y Varis, 2015).

4. A pesar de todo esto, las formas online de presentación de sí tienen características y potencialidades propias, que no se pueden reducir a los recursos existentes offline. Debido a la ausencia, en general, de contacto cara a cara, las personas pueden ocultarse detrás de un alias y construirse como personajes completamente ficcionales –algo que caracteriza el costado más oscuro del mundo social online (boyd, 2014, p. 100)–. Pero en un sentido más positivo, las personas tienden a presentarse a sí mismas en el modo mi mejor día –la forma en que desean ser percibidas por los demás (Baron, 2008, p. 71; boyd, 2014)–. También existe una multiplicidad de géneros discursivos nuevos y reconfigurados, que van desde los formatos de escritura colaborativa tipo wiki, hasta modos particulares de narrativa confesional que dan lugar a debates vinculados con la privacidad y los límites de la autoexposición (cf. Page, 2012; Van Nuenen, 2016). El mundo online es un espacio donde pueden performarse formas específicas de producción de identidad, con pocas conexiones con lo que sucede en otros espacios.

Más allá de lo que acabamos de señalar, todo lo anterior implica que una gran parte de la producción de identidad en el mundo contemporáneo oscila entre contextos online y offline, y se transfiere de unos a otros, creando así intrincadas

conexiones entre, por ejemplo, lo que se espera o se acepta en Facebook y lo que sucede en el patio de la escuela (si se piensa en el ciberbullying) o en los espacios laborales (si se piensa en los empleadores que revisan las cuentas de redes sociales de sus empleados). Así, lo que posibilita actualmente la articulación online.offline es un enorme crecimiento de la variedad disponible de cronotopos y conexiones entre cronotopos, en los que es posible organizar y evaluar normativamente el comportamiento social y los efectos identitarios (ver Blommaert y De Fina, 2017). De este modo, el carácter cronotópico de las identidades configura actualmente un vasto panorama de identidades posibles y esperadas, mucho mayor que las que permitían captar las variables sólidas y burocráticas habitualmente utilizadas por la tradición sociológica (nacionalidad, género, etnicidad, religión, clase, edad, entre otras). La variación de los cronotopos entre los que nos movemos en la vida social online.offline exige, y nos provee de, una multiplicidad de identidades livianas, que no excluyen las antiguas categorías sólidas ya establecidas, sino que las complementan. Las variables sólidas como la raza, el género, la clase o la etnicidad no están ausentes, sino que se performan de formas diferentes y, en ocasiones, sorprendentes, por lo cual requieren un balance más delicado con muchas otras formas livianas de identidad. Para mencionar solo dos, la clase social no desaparece, y tampoco la etnicidad, pero ahora ambas pueden concebirse como identidades estilizadas más que dadas, ya que son construidas a partir de un repertorio de identidades que contiene muchas orientaciones diferentes (ver, por ejemplo, Rampton, 2006; Harris, 2006; boyd, 2011; Goebel, 2015; Wang, 2015; Faudree, 2016; Fox y Sharma, 2016).

Una teoría de los grupos sociales livianos

Estas observaciones obviamente resultan pertinentes también para todo análisis de grupos sociales, ya que no hay ninguna forma realista de hablar de la identidad de un individuo sin considerar, explícita o implícitamente, las unidades sociales más grandes en referencia a las cuales se performa esa identidad.

Todas las propuestas de conceptualización de las unidades sociales –grupos, comunidades, incluso sociedad– tienen un largo pedigrí. Los clásicos de la sociología abordan como objeto la sociedad y procuran identificar y expresar las reglas que la orientan. La sociología, se dice, es la ciencia de la sociedad. Sin embargo, la forma de definir sociedad ha sido un foco de discusión desde los primeros pasos de la sociología como ciencia. En términos generales, los autores reservan el término sociedad para los aspectos percibidos como permanentes en un sistema social, en muchos casos circunscritos ad hoc (por ejemplo, en los trabajos de Durkheim y Parsons) en el marco del Estado-nación. Por tanto, hay una inclinación hacia aquellos aspectos que se consideran menos sujetos a cambios rápidos o radicales, en oposición a aspectos considerados superficiales, pasajeros o menos confiables como indicadores de la estructura social. No obstante, en muchos casos este uso del término sociedad está escasamente fundamentado. George Simmel (1950) señalaba sobre este punto que

[...] solo un apego superficial al uso lingüístico (un uso ciertamente adecuado para la práctica cotidiana) nos hace reservar el término “sociedad” únicamente para interacciones permanentes. Más específicamente, las interacciones que tenemos en mente cuando hablamos de “sociedad” están cristalizadas como estructuras delimitadas y consistentes, como el Estado y la familia, el gremio y la Iglesia, las clases sociales y las organizaciones basadas en intereses comunes. (p. 9)

Encontramos la misma preferencia por esas formas sólidas y permanentes de organización en los escritos de Parsons (por ejemplo, 1964, 2007), quien, para caracterizar la sociedad, se concentró en el patrón dominante de valores y sus efectos integradores, mientras que describía los grupos sociales más pequeños y livianos como unidos por normas, con lo que muchas veces las interacciones entre ambos grupos terminaban en contradicciones y desorden. Esta jerarquización en la que la sociedad es presentada como organizada en primer lugar por lazos fuertes dentro de comunidades sólidas como las mencionadas por Simmel (el Estado, la Iglesia, etc.) y, en segundo lugar, por lazos más livianos entre una multiplicidad de grupos sociales, no impidió –por supuesto– que se prestara atención a estos últimos. Pero los estudios de subgrupos sociales más pequeños tendían a enfatizar su carácter relativamente superficial y efímero. Veamos, por ejemplo, la forma en que Bourdieu y Passeron (1964) describen la comunidad estudiantil parisina de los años 1960: “El medio estudiantil está posiblemente más desintegrado hoy que en toda su historia [...]. Todo nos lleva, por tanto, a dudar de si los estudiantes constituyen, efectivamente, un grupo social homogéneo, independiente e integrado” (pp. 54-55, trad. del autor del original en francés).

La falta de homogeneidad, independencia o autonomía y el bajo nivel de integración determinan entonces la naturaleza de los estudiantes como grupo social. Bourdieu y Passeron claramente consideran a los estudiantes menos grupo social que, por ejemplo, las clases sociales, y no deberíamos dejarnos llevar por las apariencias de una grupalidad superficial: “Los estudiantes pueden tener prácticas en común, pero eso no debería llevarnos a concluir que tienen experiencias iguales de esas prácticas ni, sobre todo, una experiencia colectiva” (1964, pp. 24-25).

Precisamente el mismo argumento fue utilizado por Goffman en Encounters (1961), cuando describió a los jugadores de póker como una comunidad fuertemente focalizada de personas, sin otros contactos entre ellas más allá del juego, donde compartían reglas de conducta claras y transparentes (y, cada vez que alguien se sumaba a una partida, se daba por sentado que también las compartía). Goffman concibió esos agrupamientos estrechos, pero breves y efímeros, como conjuntos de personas que compartían solo las reglas de los encuentros (una microhegemonía, podríamos decir) y no mucho más. Esos grupos livianos podían estudiarse como modo de lograr un conocimiento sobre procesos sociales fundamentales como la socialización y el desarrollo de la identidad (ver Becker, Geer, Hughes y Strauss, 1961 como un ejemplo clásico). Pero no podían ser percibidos siquiera como grupos sociales y, cuando se trataba de comprender la sociedad, la atención debía dirigirse a las comunidades sólidas. Estas estaban hasta tal punto reificadas que cualquier modificación del conjunto establecido de comunidades sólidas que pudiera potencialmente dislocar el consenso sobre su estabilidad y homogeneidad interna llevaba invariablemente a fuertes controversias [7] .

Simmel, como vimos, expresa ser consciente del carácter convencional –es decir, no teorizado– de este consenso en torno al alcance de sociedad. Y después de mencionar “el Estado y la familia, el gremio y la Iglesia, las clases sociales y las organizaciones basadas en intereses comunes” como espacios estereotípicos para las “interacciones permanentes”, continúa:

Pero, además de estas, hay una cantidad inconmensurable de formas de relación y tipos de interacción menos conspicuos. Considerados individualmente, estos pueden parecer irrelevantes. Pero dado que, en las prácticas efectivas, están insertos en las formaciones sociales, abarcadoras y, por así decirlo, oficiales, solo ellos producen la sociedad como la conocemos [...]. Basándose solo en las grandes formaciones sociales –la materia tradicional de las ciencias sociales– no sería posible reconstruir la vida real de la sociedad como la percibimos en nuestra experiencia. (Simmel, 1950, p. 9) [8]

En otras palabras –y aquí hay una exhortación metodológica de importancia considerable–, si nos proponemos comprender “la sociedad como la conocemos”, necesitamos observar estas “formas de relación y tipos de interacción menos conspicuos” no en lugar de, sino a la vez que “las grandes formaciones sociales”. Solo podemos acceder a la sociedad, necesariamente abstracta, a través de la investigación de las microprácticas realizadas en terreno por sus miembros, teniendo en cuenta que esas microprácticas pueden alejarse bastante de lo que creemos caracteriza a la sociedad y que pueden llegar a evidenciar complejos vínculos entre prácticas y aspectos de la estructura social (ver Collins, 1981).

Para los sociolingüistas, este es un problema conocido: la Lengua con mayúscula solo puede analizarse a partir de la indagación de sus formas concretas y situadas de uso y, aunque preferimos definir la Lengua como un objeto estable, autónomo y homogéneo, las formas efectivas de uso están caracterizadas por una variabilidad, una diversidad y un dinamismo que resultan abrumadores. Comprender qué es el lenguaje y qué hace, en la realidad de la vida social, nos obliga a tomar como objeto las formas variables, diversas y dinámicas del uso lingüístico (el habla), aunque no puedan ser inmediatamente encuadradas en un marco normativo de Lengua (ver Hymes, 1996). Más aún: un espacio privilegiado de investigación, con potencialidades analíticas muy novedosas, son los grupos de pares pequeños y muy heterogéneos, donde las fronteras de las lenguas y de las grandes formaciones sociales están difuminadas (por ejemplo, Gumperz, 1982; Rampton, 2006; Harris, 2006; Jörgensen, 2008).

En este punto, podemos extender el alcance de estas conclusiones y llevarlas al campo más amplio de la acción social. El núcleo teórico de lo que sigue puede sintetizarse así:

• Las prácticas sociales online generan un amplio espectro de comunidades livianas, con formas completamente novedosas;

• en los contextos sociales online.offline que habitamos, comprender la acción social requiere atender a esos grupos livianos a la vez que a los grupos sólidos, dado que en la experiencia cotidiana de grandes cantidades de personas, la pertenencia a grupos livianos muchas veces predomina sobre la pertenencia a comunidades sólidas;

• las comunidades livianas exhiben, pues, muchos de los rasgos que tradicionalmente se adscriben a las comunidades sólidas. Más aún: si queremos comprender las formas contemporáneas de cohesión social, necesitamos tomar conciencia del rol central de las comunidades livianas y de las prácticas livianas de convivialidad como factores de cohesión.

Permítanme desarrollar brevemente el primer punto. Para aquellos que se preguntan si internet ha creado algo nuevo en relación con las formaciones sociales: sí, lo ha hecho. Las redes sociales, en particular, han generado grupos que no se habían registrado nunca: enormes comunidades de usuarios, quienes –a diferencia de las audiencias de televisión– contribuyen activamente con los contenidos y los patrones de interacción de los nuevos medios.

Los 1790 millones de usuarios de Facebook constituyen una comunidad de medios que no tiene precedente en la historia; esto también vale para los aproximadamente 10 millones de personas que juegan el juego masivo online World of Warcraft y los 50 millones de personas que usan la aplicación de citas Tinder para conocer a un(a) compañero(a) apropiado(a).

Todas estas comunidades están formadas por individuos que se unen a ellas voluntaria y activamente para realizar tipos completamente nuevos de prácticas sociales. La pertenencia a esos grupos es experimentada por muchos de sus miembros como indispensable en la vida cotidiana, incluso si las prácticas desarrolladas en esos grupos no se ven como vitales o indicativas de su identidad principal –esos son grupos y prácticas livianos–.

Pero además de esas comunidades voluntarias, internet genera también comunidades involuntarias a través de sus funciones algorítmicas, reuniendo a personas en redes agrupadas por intereses y perfiles comunes, de las que los integrantes no siempre están al tanto. Internet genera, por tanto, una serie de nuevas identidades performadas y a la vez una serie de nuevas identidades adscritas; mientras que las primeras habitualmente funcionan como espacios de interacción interpersonal e intercambio de saberes entre los usuarios, la función de las últimas es opaca para los miembros adscritos, que son categorizados en función de las prioridades de terceros, las cuales van desde los estudios de mercado a la seguridad y la inteligencia.

Una vez establecidos estos aspectos básicos, paso ahora a la articulación online.offline y a revisar algunas de las investigaciones que estudian cómo el interjuego de recursos identitarios online y offline habilita la formación de estos tipos específicos de comunidad.

En un estudio reciente, Ico Maly y Piia Varis (2015) muestran cómo la comunidad urbana hipster, actualmente muy conocida, debe ser analizada como una instancia típica de la globalización vernácula descrita por Appadurai. Si los hipsters se han transformado en un fenómeno globalizado, sus condiciones de surgimiento, sus características y posiciones sociales están determinadas localmente y forman –en conjunto– un campo identitario polinómico y microhegemónico (ver Blommaert, 2017). Los rasgos globales de los grupos son en su mayor parte imágenes basadas en internet que abarcan el estilo de vida, el ethos de consumo y una misma orientación en el vestir y el uso de commodities (pensemos en el culto al café, las barbas, los pantalones ajustados, los iPhones y los anteojos vintage como rasgos emblemáticos). Internet ofrece, como lo demuestran Maly y Varis, montones de recursos en tutoriales para hispters en construcción (o bien hipsters inseguros) de todo el mundo. Internet funciona, por tanto, como un entorno de aprendizaje de las diversas normas que moldean y regulan las culturas hipster. Entre esas normas se incluyen las sutiles distinciones discursivas relativas a la propia categoría de hipster:

Es posible distinguir, así, grupos sociales que se visten como hipsters, comparten un discurso de identidad basado en la autenticidad y frecuentan lugares hipsters. Estos se distancian de otro grupo de personas a los que ellos denominan “hipsters”: un verdadero hipster es alguien que se niega a ser parte de un grupo social y por tanto rechaza la categoría de hispter, que está reservada para las personas que desean desesperadamente ser hip [“modernas”] y, por lo tanto, no son reales ni auténticas. Tampoco son innovadoras o marcadoras de tendencias, como sí lo son los auténticos hipsters individualistas. (Maly y Varis, 2015, p. 10)

De este modo, hay una fuerte tendencia a autoidentificarse como individualistas no estándar y contraculturales que, sin embargo, va de la mano con un consumismo neoliberal (y, por tanto, estándar) exuberante y declarado, apoyado en la industria global de la moda ajustada. Como resultado, esta búsqueda del individualismo termina en un grado notable de uniformidad global. Los hipsters son, más que nada, identificables como hipsters, aunque los acentos locales tienen su importancia y portan valores de identidad local, y aunque la fractalidad habitual de órdenes de indexicalidad habilita nuevas subdivisiones dentro del cam- po hipster, tales como el mipster (de muslim hipster, hipster musulmán).

Maly y Varis proponen el término micropoblación translocal para describir a los hipsters, y es fácil pensar en otros estilos de vida globalizados que también se corresponderían con esta categoría –pensemos en el hiphop, el rasta, el metal o las comunidades góticas, pero también en los fashio- nistas, los amantes de la comida y los fanáticos de ligas de fútbol, entre otros–. Estas micropoblaciones se podrían describir más precisamente como grupos de personas que están conectadas de manera translocal en lo que podría denominarse comunidades de conocimiento, mientras que localmente se desenvuelven en comunidades de prácticas. Este último término es más conocido y fue usado por Lave y Wenger (1991) para describir grupos con interacciones frecuentes que conforman un entorno de aprendizaje de normas y reglas (no muy diferente de los conocidos en los Encounters de Goffman (1961), o de los estudiantes de medicina de Becker et al. (1961)) y evidentemente el conocimiento es –desde la perspectiva de Lave y Wenger– un componente de la práctica.

Sin embargo, la de Lave y Wenger era una descripción offline en la que las prácticas de aprendizaje presuponían la copresencia espaciotemporal. Lo que vemos en el contexto de los hipsters, y de otros grupos contemporáneos de estilos de vida, es que internet se ha transformado en la infraestructura de diversas formas específicas de recolección y circulación de información no basadas en las experiencias de interacción cara a cara. De este modo, dan lugar a un conjunto más amplio y profundo de formación de comunidades, escalares y policéntricas. Estamos frente a un nuevo tipo de formación social: una comunidad liviana que se diferencia de las grandes formaciones sociales enumeradas por Simmel, trascendiendo las variables que habitualmente se consideraban esenciales para comprender la acción social, y evidenciando (de acuerdo con los criterios formulados por Bourdieu y Passeron para definir los grupos sociales) un alto grado de homogeneidad, autonomía e integración por sobre, y más allá de, su diversidad.

La capacidad que posee internet para generar esas comunidades de conocimiento translocales es inmensa, y recién estamos comenzando a explorar estos fenómenos como dimensiones relevantes de la imaginación sociológica. Estas comunidades de conocimiento muchas veces son solo eso: comunidades o foros online donde se intercambia y se debate información sobre una variedad infinita de temas (por ejemplo, Kytölä, 2013; Hanell y Salö, 2015; Mendoza-Denton, 2015). Pero internet también ha posibilitado el surgimiento de una nueva forma de movilización translocal de comunidades políticas y es imposible comprender la dinámica política y social contemporánea sin indagar esas comunidades de conocimiento basadas en la red (ver McCaughey y Ayers, 2003; Graeber, 2009) [9] . En los últimos años, comunidades que comenzaron online han triunfado en elecciones offline como partidos políticos bona fide (pensemos en Syriza, en Grecia, y Podemos, en España).

Estos procesos de formación de comunidades online también se producen donde menos se esperaría y algunos de los datos más impactantes provienen de China, un país conocido por su restrictiva política de censura en internet. Esto queda ilustrado en el estudio de Caixia Du (2016) sobre las actividades online del precariado chino. Debido al crecimiento económico de China, millones de personas jóvenes y de un alto nivel educativo están empleadas en trabajos administrativos precarios. Estas personas, argumenta Du, comparten un agudo sentimiento de desempoderamiento: bajos ingresos y empleos inestables los han ubicado en los márgenes de una sociedad cada vez más enfocada en el éxito material y el consumo de alto perfil. Dado que manejan fluidamente la literacidad digital y que en China casi no hay espacios para la disidencia sociopolítica, formulan y comparten sus experiencias online. Du describe cómo esta gran comunidad –una clase en formación, como la caracteriza– desarrolla su propio lenguaje secreto a través de una hábil manipulación de memes, lo suficientemente sofisticada como para despistar a los motores de búsqueda de la censura. La comunidad también construye y comparte una cultura emblemática llamada e’gao basada en la parodia y la ridiculización de objetos culturales prestigiosos, y sus miembros se han creado una identificación específica: diaosi, término despectivo que significa “perdedores” (ver también Li, Spotti y Kroon, 2014; Yang, Tang y Wang, 2015). Estas prácticas culturales blandas muestran el surgimiento gradual, insiste Du, de una formación social que hasta entonces no existía en China: un vasto precariado, crítico del gobierno y de las élites multimillonarias, y fuente potencial de agitación social en China. Y todo esto sucede online.

Las comunidades livianas, como podemos ver, parecen tener características y formas de práctica bastante sólidas. En consecuencia, hay razones para suponer que las prácticas livianas que caracterizan muchas de las interacciones online –pensemos en acciones como “dar ‘me gusta’”, firmar una petición, compartir o retuitear en las redes sociales– no son tan livianas como podría creerse. Su función principal, sugerimos, consiste en establecer y mantener relaciones de convivialidad (Varis y Blommaert, 2013). Pero no debemos olvidar que la convivialidad es una forma elemental y central de la conducta social dentro de las comunidades: en gran medida, es como conversar con los vecinos o intercambiar saludos navideños con amigos y familiares. Podrían, entonces, entenderse como prácticas livianas con efectos sólidos: la cohesión e integración social en el interior de grupos online que se expande, cada vez más, hacia el mundo offline.

Una teoría policéntrica de la integración social

El término integración continúa utilizándose para describir los procesos por los cuales los extranjeros –inmigrantes, para ser más precisos– necesitan pasar a “formar parte” de la “cultura receptora”. He puesto estos términos claves entre comillas y el porqué de esta decisión se aclarará en breve. Por supuesto, la integración –entendida en este sentido específico– ha sido un concepto sociológico capital en la tradición de Durkheim-Parsons: una sociedad es un conglomerado de grupos sociales que se mantienen unidos gracias a la integración, es decir (un único conjunto de) valores centrales compartidos que definen el carácter, la identidad (en singular) de esa sociedad (en singular). Y es este sentido específico del término lo que motiva denuncias –una larga tradición de denuncias– en los que los inmigrantes son acusados de no estar completamente integrados o, más estrictamente, de encerrarse en su propia cultura y negarse a la integración en la sociedad receptora (ver Blommaert y Verschueren, 1998).

Hace medio siglo, en una crítica incisiva a la concepción de integración de Parsons, C. Wright Mills (1959) planteó que los cambios históricos en las sociedades deben implicar necesariamente desplazamientos en los modos de integración. Numerosos investigadores han documentado estos desplazamientos fundamentales (pensemos en Bauman, Castells, Beck y Lash), pero los discursos hegemónicos, tanto académicos como legos, aún persisten en atenerse a la monolítica y estática imaginación parsoniana. A continuación, quisiera proponer que los nuevos modos de diáspora –condicionados, ahora, por el acceso a nuevas formas de comunicación mediada– conllevan, sin duda, nuevos modos de integración.

Para formularlo como una proposición teórica: por principio, las personas deben estar integradas a una amplia variedad de comunidades, tanto sólidas como livianas, y en distintos grados. Un individuo bien integrado es aquel que ha alcanzado esas diversas formas de integración y es capaz de moverse de una comunidad a otra, cambiando –a la vez– los modos de integración esperados en cada una de ellas. Se puede encontrar evidencia para respaldar esta proposición en los nuevos modos de interacción y en los nuevos repertorios de tales modos.

En una maravillosa tesis, Jelke Brandehof (2014; para un estudio similar, ver Nemcova, 2016; también Tall, 2004) investigó las formas en que un grupo de estudiantes doctorales cameruneses en la Universidad de Gante (Bélgica) utilizaban los recursos comunicativos en sus interacciones con otros. Para ello, indagó las tecnologías –teléfonos celulares y aplicaciones online–, así como los recursos lingüísticos y de literacidad usados en distintos patrones comunicativos con diferentes personas según los casos. En otras palabras, Brandehof analizó el repertorio de recursos comunicativos de los participantes de su investigación y cómo los elementos de sus repertorios eran desplegados en modos concretos de interacción.

La figura 1 es una representación de los resultados correspondientes a un participante de género masculino (Brandehof, 2014, p. 38).

Esta figura 1, argumento, representa la dimensión empírica de la integración: formas reales de integración en situaciones contemporáneas de diáspora. Permítanme desarrollar esta idea.

La red comunicativa de un estudiante de doctorado camerunés en Gante (Bélgica)

Figura 1: La red comunicativa de un estudiante de doctorado camerunés en Gante (Bélgica)

Fuente: Jelke Brandehof (2014), acceso abierto.

La figura se ve –sin duda– extremadamente compleja; sin embargo, en ella hay una enorme proporción de orden y lógica. Podemos ver que este hombre camerunés pone en juego una amplia variedad de tecnologías y plataformas de comunicación: su línea de teléfono celular (con tarifas muy reducidas para las llamadas intercontinentales), Skype, Facebook, Beep, Yahoo Messenger, diferentes sistemas VoIP, WhatsApp, entre otros. También utiliza múltiples y diferentes recursos lingüísticos, algunos exclusivamente orales, otros orales y escritos (en diversas formas): inglés estándar, pidgin camerunés, lenguas locales (denominadas dialectos en la figura) y fula (lengua fulani). Y mantiene contactos en tres espacios diferentes: su propio entorno físico, económico y social en Gante, su entorno de origen en Camerún y el entorno virtual del mercado laboral en Camerún. En términos de actividades, mantiene contactos relacionados con sus estudios, a la vez que participa en redes sociales y profesionales en Gante, en la búsqueda de trabajo en internet y en una intrincada trama de actividades familiares y laborales en Camerún. Cada una de estas actividades –aquí están el orden y la lógica– involucra una elección consciente de medio tecnológico y recursos lingüísticos en función del destinatario y, frecuentemente, del tema de la interacción. La interacción con su hermano en Camerún se lleva a cabo a través de aplicaciones de teléfonos inteligentes y en lengua local, mientras que las interacciones con otras personas que están en el mismo lugar, pero versan sobre temas religiosos, se llevan a cabo en fula, una lengua marcada regionalmente como el medio para la comunicación entre musulmanes.

Permítanme sintetizar esto en un discurso más teórico. En este ejemplo, observamos cómo se utiliza un conjunto estructurado de prácticas sociales, cada una apoyada en determinados recursos del repertorio disponible, para establecer, mantener o modificar relaciones sociales dentro de grupos sociales (con colegas, familia, amigos, local y translocalmente). Las prácticas sociales son prácticas interaccionales colectivas y las relaciones vinculadas a esas prácticas son formas colectivamente ratificadas de sociación (en términos de Simmel): la creación continua de eventos sociales dentro de un sistema de normatividad compartida. También observamos el esfuerzo que el participante de Brandehof invierte en establecer y mantener este complejo abanico de relaciones sociales, lo que implica una considerable demanda a los recursos de su repertorio. La sociación que presenciamos aquí parece entonces tener un alto precio, es un bien valioso. En síntesis, observamos la acción social colectiva, organizada normativamente (y, en ese sentido, con carácter cultural), desarrollada con altos niveles de compromiso hacia las relaciones sostenidas, y distribuida en diversas configuraciones espaciotemporales (cronotopos). Ahora podemos reformular lo anterior en un marco durkheimiano-parsoniano.

A través del uso organizado de estos instrumentos de comunicación, nuestro sujeto está integrado en múltiples comunidades. Está integrado en su entorno profesional y social en Gante, en el mercado local donde se proyecta su futuro y en su comunidad de origen con su familia y amigos, incluyendo sus dimensiones religiosas. Notemos que uso un término positivo: está integrado en todas estas zonas que conforman su vida, porque su vida se desarrolla en tiempo sincrónico real en estas diferentes zonas y todas esas zonas tienen un rol fundamental en la vida de este sujeto. Permanece integrado como miembro de su familia, como amigo, como musulmán y como socio comercial en Camerún y, a la vez, se va integrando en su entorno más directamente tangible en Gante, social, profesional y económicamente. Por supuesto, algunas de esas zonas coinciden con los grupos sólidos de la sociología clásica –el Estado-nación, la familia, la religión– mientras que otros se podrían describir más bien como comunidades livianas: la comunidad de estudiantes, el lugar de trabajo, las redes basadas en la Web, entre otras.

Este nivel de integración simultánea en distintas comunidades, tanto sólidas como livianas, es necesario. El participante de Brandehof se propone completar su formación doctoral en Gante y retornar a Camerún como un trabajador intelectual altamente calificado. Cortar con sus redes en Camerún, o incluso suspenderlas temporalmente, podría poner en riesgo sus posibilidades de reinsertarse en un mercado de trabajo muy lucrativo (y de generar posibilidades de negocios) a su regreso. Mientras permanece en Gante, una parte de su vida se desarrolla ahí, y a la vez otra parte continúa desarrollándose en Camerún, por muy buenas razones. La integración simultánea en diversas comunidades no debería, sin embargo, llevarnos a considerar que los grados de integración serán similares. Podemos dar por sentado que nuestro sujeto está integrado más profundamente en sus comunidades familiar y religiosa en Camerún, por ejemplo, que en el mercado informal de trabajo de Gante, donde necesita las recomendaciones y el apoyo de otros para poder manejarse.

Enfaticé antes que nuestro sujeto debe mantenerse integrado en diferentes zonas cronotópicas, lo suficientemente integrado, no completamente integrado. Y las tecnologías para la comunicación de larga distancia, baratas e intensivas, le permiten hacerlo. Este es probablemente el desplazamiento fundamental de los modos de integración desde el inicio del siglo XXI: la diáspora ya no implica una ruptura temporal o permanente con los lugares y las comunidades de origen; tampoco, lógicamente, implica la integración completa en la comunidad receptora, porque hay instrumentos que nos permiten llevar una vida más agradable, que en algunos aspectos transcurre en la sociedad receptora mientras que en otros aspectos transcurre en otros lugares. Esta es la auténtica cara de la sociedad red propuesta por Castells: vemos que los sujetos diaspóricos mantienen un pie en las comunidades sólidas de la familia, el vecindario y los amigos locales de su lugar de origen, mientras mantienen otro pie –en términos más instrumentales– en la sociedad receptora y todavía otro más en las comunidades livianas, como los grupos basados en las redes y el mercado laboral informal. En su conjunto, estos diferentes niveles y centros de integración conforman la vida diaspórica en la modernidad tardía.

No hay nada excepcional ni sorprendente en esto: la clase profesional y cosmopolita de negocios europea hace precisamente lo mismo cuando sale en viajes de negocios: los teléfonos inteligentes e internet le permiten llamar a su casa y conversar con sus hijas a la hora de dormir e informar a sus conocidos sobre sus recorridos a través de historias actualizadas en las redes sociales. En ese sentido, la distancia entre las famosas categorías de Zygmunt Bauman (1996), el turista y el vagabundo, se está reduciendo: distintos tipos de migrantes utilizan actualmente las tecnologías antes reservadas a los viajeros de élite. Y, del mismo modo que las potencialidades de estas tecnologías son vistas por los viajeros de élite como una mejora para su estilo de vida nómade, también son percibidas como positivas por estos otros migrantes, ya que facilitan un estilo de vida más armonioso y gratificante, que no involucra dolorosas rupturas con los lazos sociales, roles sociales, patrones de actividades e identidades previas.

Por tanto, lo que parece un problema desde la visión política de la integración completa, apoyada en una vulgarización de la teoría parsoniana, es en realidad una solución para las personas que desarrollan esos comportamientos problemáticos. El problema es teórico y se origina en el tipo de imaginación sociológica monolítica y estática que ya C. Wright Mills y otros criticaban, así como en la distancia existente entre esta teoría y los hechos empíricos de la vida diaspórica contemporánea. Los reclamos de integración completa a una sola comunidad (y las quejas cuando esto no sucede) deberían verse como nostálgicos y, cuando son proferidas en debates políticos, como falsa conciencia. O, para decirlo más crudamente, como surrealismo sociológico.

Conclusión: una sociología especializada

Permítanme ahora hacer una afirmación audaz: las dos teorías que he sugerido en este ensayo no son fáciles de descartar o impugnar. Seguramente, habrá quienes objeten que están basadas en una forma de investigación cuyo estatuto como ciencia es cuestionable: la mayor parte de la investigación en la que he basado mis afirmaciones es trabajo organizado etnográficamente, cualitativo, en pequeña escala y surgido de estudios de caso. Definitivamente, esto no es lo que Karl Popper tenía en mente cuando utilizó el término científico (por ejemplo, Popper, 1976). A la vez, si Popper se explayó ampliamente sobre cómo se deberían comprobar las teorías, no dijo mucho sobre el modo en que esas teorías deberían ser forjadas. En ese sentido, se puede lograr una mejor comprensión de los complejos y cambiantes sistemas que llamamos sociedad contemporánea si se utilizan “métodos que nos permitirían descubrir fenómenos cuya existencia no conocíamos al inicio de la investigación”, para citar a uno de los estudios más interesantes y teóricamente relevantes de los que haya registro (Becker et al., 1961, p. 18). Y esto me lleva al segundo argumento para sostener mi audaz afirmación.

Sería muy ingenuo suponer que estas dos teorías tienen algún grado de innovación, en sentido estricto. Hemos visto intuiciones teóricas similares en el trabajo de Simmel, por ejemplo, y más aún en el de Goffman y el de otros sociólogos del interaccionismo simbólico (por ejemplo, Goffman, 1971; Blumer, 1969). De hecho, veo a ambas teorías como extensiones de los hallazgos fundamentales realizados por el interaccionismo simbólico. Sin embargo, estas extensiones tienen una dimensión cualitativa que es crucial: a las intuiciones teóricas ya planteadas hemos sumado un sustento empírico basado en un campo de evidencia de procesos sociales fundamentales: la interacción social. Como dije al inicio, hay una objetividad sui géneris (léase: una existencia como objeto) de la interacción social cuando se examina la sociedad y –salvo para algunos exponentes de la teoría de elección racional, que imaginan una sociedad formada por personas patológicamente solitarias– toda forma realista de imaginación sociológica deberá otorgar un lugar destacado a la interacción en su fenomenología [10] . Una atención detallada a la interacción nos ofrece, por tanto, un acceso privilegiado a la trama de la que se componen los procesos, los eventos, las formaciones y las estructuras sociales. Esto genera evidencia de algo fundamentalmente social, algo que no puede ser refutado o descartado como accesorio sin correr el riesgo de alejarse de lo que es observable y realista (y –agrego– verificable) y de adentrarse en un terreno con escaso fundamento en los datos disponibles. De modo que, aunque las teorías basadas en evidencia sociolingüística no sean nuevas per se, sí son más fuertes que la mayoría de las otras teorías. Bourdieu (por nombrar solo a un autor) lo entendía claramente (Blommaert, 2015b).

Sería deseable, entonces, que se realizara más regularmente una minería de datos sociolingüísticos en busca de esos elementos que pueden aportar las bases para una heurística generalizable, innovadora e imaginativa, en la que los hechos sociolingüísticos son –casi tautológicamente– transformados y reformulados como hechos sociales; es decir, se pasa de una sociología especializada a una sociología general. Estoy convencido de que esto es no solo útil, sino también tremendamente necesario.

Referencias bibliográficas

Androutsopoulos, J. (2016). Theorizing media, mediation and mediatization. En N. Coupland (ed.), Sociolinguistics: Theoretical debates (pp. 282-302). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at large: Cultural dimensions of globalization. Mineápolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Arnaut, K. (2016). Superdiversity: Elements of an emerging perspective. En K. Arnaut, J. Blommaert, B. Rampton y M. Spotti (eds.), Language and superdiversity (pp. 49-70). Nueva York: Routledge.

Arnaut, K., Karrebaek, M. S. y Spotti, M. (2017). The poeieisis-infrastructures nexus and language practices in combinatorial spaces. En K. Arnaut, J. Blommaert, M. S. Karrebaek y M. Spotti (eds.), Engaging superdiversity: Recombining spaces, times, and language practices (pp. 3-24). Brístol: Multilingual Matters.

Baron, N. (2008). Always on: Language in an online and mobile world. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bauman, Z. (1996). Tourists and vagabonds: Heroes and victims of postmodernity. Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna, Political Science Series, 30. Recuperado de http://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/26687/ssoar-1996-baumanntourists_and_vagabonds.pdf?sequence=1 [Link]

Becker, H., Geer, B., Hughes, E. y Strauss, A. (1961). Boys in white: Student culture in medical school. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Blommaert, J. (2010). The sociolinguistics of globalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Blommaert, J. (2015a). Meaning as a nonlinear effect: The birth of cool. AILA Review, 28, 7-27.

Blommaert, J. (2015b). Pierre Bourdieu: Perspectives on language in society. En J.-O. Östman y J. Verschueren (eds.), Handbook of pragmatics 2015 (pp. 1-16). Ámsterdam: John Benjamins.

Blommaert, J. (2016). “Meeting of styles” and the online infrastructures of graffiti. Applied Linguistics Review, 7(2), 99-115.

Blommaert, J. (2017). Durkheim and the internet: On sociolinguistics and the sociological imagination. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 173. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/babylon/tpcs/itempaper-173-tpcs.htm [Link]

Blommaert, J. y De Fina, A. (2017). Chronotopic identities: On the timespace organization of who we are. En A. de Fina, J. Wegner y D. Ikizoglu (eds.), Diversity and super-diversity. Sociocultural linguistic perspectives. Washington D. C.: Georgetown University Press.

Blommaert, J. y Rampton, B. (2016). Language and superdiversity. En K. Arnaut, J. Blommaert, B. Rampton y M. Spotti (Eds.). Language and superdiversity (pp. 21-48). Nueva York: Routledge.

Blommaert, J. y Varis, P. (2015). Enoughness, accent, and light communities: Essays on contemporary identities. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 139. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/babylon/tpcs/item-paper-139-tpcs.htm [Link]

Blommaert, J. y Verschueren, J. (1998). Debating diversity: Analysing the discourse of tolerance. Londres: Routledge.

Blumer, H. (1969). Symbolic interactionism: Perspectives and method. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.

Bourdieu, P. y Passeron, J.-C. (1964 [1985]). Les héritiers: les étudiants et la culture. París: Minuit.

boyd, D. (2011). White flight in networked publics? How race and class shaped American teen engagement with MySpace and Facebook. En L. Nakamura y P. Chow-White (eds.), Race after the Internet (pp. 203-222). Nueva York: Routledge.

boyd, D. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Brandehof, J. (2014). Superdiversity in a cameroonian diaspora community in Ghent: The social structure of superdiverse networks. [MA dissertation]. Tilburg University, Países Bajos. (Sin publicar).

Brevini, B., Hintz, A. y McCurdy, P. (eds.). (2013). Beyond Wikileaks: Implications for the future of communications, journalism, and society. Londres: Palgrave Macmillan. Castells, M. (1996). The rise of the network society. Londres: Blackwell.

Collins, R. (1981). On the microfoundations of macrosociology. American Journal of Sociology, 86(5), 984-1014.

Coupland, N. (ed.). (2016). Sociolinguistics: Theoretical debates. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Du, C. (2016). The birth of social class online: The Chinese precariat on the internet. [PhD Dissertation]. Tilburg University, Países Bajos.

Faudree, P. (2016). Singing for the dead on and offline: Diversity, migration and scale in Mexican Muertos music. Language & Communication, 44, 31-43.

Fox, S. y Sharma, D. (2016). The language of London and Londoners. Working Papers in Urban Language and Literacies, 201. Recuperado de https://www.academia.edu/29025532/WP201_Fox_and_Sharma_2016._The_language_of_London_and_Londoners [Link]

Glaser, B. y Strauss, A. (1967). The discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for qualitative research. Chicago: Aldine.

Goebel, Z. (2015). Language and superdiversity: Indonesians knowledging home and abroad. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Goffman, E. (1961). Encounters: Two studies in the sociology of interaction. Nueva York: Bobbs-Merrill.

Goffman, E. (1971). Relations in public: Microstudies of the public order. Nueva York: Basic Books.

Graeber, D. (2009). Direct action: An ethnography. Edimburgo: AK Press.

Gumperz, J. (1982). Discourse strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hanell, L. y Salö, L. (2015). “That’s weird, my obgyn said the exact opposite!” Discourse and knowledge in an online discussion forum thread for expecting parents. Tilburg Papers in Cultural Studies, 125. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/dc6b8024-c2004dbd-8bdb-bd684aa636c0_TPCS_125_Hanell-Salo.pdf [Link]

Harris, R. (2006). New ethnicities and language use. Londres: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hobsbawm, E. (1987). The age of empire, 1875-1914. Londres: Weidenfeld & Nicholson.

Hymes, D. (1996). Ethnography, linguistics, narrative inequality: Toward an understanding of voice. Londres: Taylor & Francis.

Jewitt, C. (2013). Multimodal methods for researching digital technologies. En S. Price, C. Jewitt y B. Brown (eds.), The Sage handbook of digital technology research (pp. 250-265). Los Ángeles: Sage.

Jones, G. (2014). Reported speech as an authentication tactic in computer-mediated communication. En V. Lacoste, J. Leimgruber y T. Breier (eds.), Indexing authenticity: Sociolinguistic perspectives (pp. 188208). Berlín: De Gruyter.

Jörgensen, J. N. (2008). Languaging: Nine years of poly-lingual development of young turkish-danis grade school students. Copenhague: University of Copenhagen Faculty of Humanities.

Kress, G. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. Londres: Routledge.

Kytölä, S. (2013). Multilingual language use and metapragmatic reflexivity in Finnish internet football forums: A study in the sociolinguistics of globalization. [PhD dissertation]. University of Jyväskylä, Finlandia.

Kytölä, S. y Westinen, E. (2015). “Chocolate munching wanabee rapper, you’re out”: A finnish footballer’s Twitter writing as the focus of metapragmatic debates. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 128. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/6f479b83-f64d-48d4-bb6c988e15935c71_TPCS_128_Kytola-Westinen.pdf [Link]

Lave, J. y Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Leppänen, S. (2007). Youth language in media contexts: Insights into the function of English in Finland. World Englishes, 26(2), 149-169.

Leppänen, S. y Peuronen, S. (2012). Multilingualism on the Internet. En M. Martoin-Jones, A. Blackledge y A. Creese (eds.), Handbook of multilingualism (pp. 384-402). Londres: Routledge.

Leppänen, S., Westinen, E. y Kytölä, S. (eds.) (2017). Social media discourse, (dis)identifications and diversities. Londres: Routledge.

Li, K., Spotti, M. y Kroon, S. (2014). An e-ethnography of baifumei on the Baidu Tieba: Investigating an emerging economy of identification online. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 120. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/c7982626-e1a6-40a8-9334-9fba945ac568_TPCS_120_Kunming-Spotti-Kroon.pdf [Link]

Maly, I. (2016). How did Trump get this far? Explaining Trumps message. Diggit Magazine. Recuperado de https://www.diggitmagazine.com/articles/how-did-trump-get-far [Link]

Maly, I. y Varis, P. (2015). The 21st-century hipster: On micro-populations in times of superdiversity. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 19(6), 1-17.

McCaughey, M. y Ayers, M. (eds.) (2003). Cyberactivism: Online activism in theory and practice. Nueva York: Routledge.

Mendoza-Denton, N. (2015). Gangs on YouTube: Localism, Spanish/English variation, and music fandom. Working Papers in Urban Language and Literacies, 157. Recuperado de https://www.academia.edu/11599619/WP157_Mendoza-Denton_2015._Gangs_on_YouTube_Localism_Spanish_English_variation_and_music_fandom [Link]

Miller, V. (2008). New media, networking and phatic culture. Convergence, 14, 387-400.

Mills, C. W. (1951). White collar: The American middle classes. Nueva York: Oxford University Press.

Mills, C. W. (1959 [2000]). The sociological imagination. Nueva York: Oxford University Press

Nemcova, M. (2016). Rethinking integration: Superdiversity in the networks of transnational individuals. Tilburg Papers in Culture Studies, 167. Recuperado de https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/d1833428-a654-4a72-aefc-be19edeea82d_TPCS_167_Nemcova.pdf [Link]

Page, R. (2012). Stories and social media: Identities and interaction. Londres: Routledge.

Parsons, T. (1964). Social structure and personality. Nueva York: Free Press.

Parsons, T. (2007). American society: A theory of the societal community. Boulder: Paradigm Press.

Popper, K. (1976). The logic of the social sciences. En T. Adorno, H. Albert, R. Dahrendorf, J. Habermas, H. Pilot y K. Popper, The positivist dispute in German sociology (pp. 87-104). Nueva York: Harper & Row.

Rampton, B. (2006). Language in late modernity: Interactions in an urban school. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sierra, S. (2016). Playing out loud: Videogame references as resources in friend interaction for managing frames, epistemics, and group identity. Language in Society, 45, 217-245.

Simmel, G. (1950). The sociology of Georg Simmel. Glencoe: The Free Press.

Standing, G. (2011). The precariat: The new dangerous class. Londres: Bloomsbury.

Tall, S. M. (2004). Senegalese émigrés: New information and communication technologies. Review of African Political Economy, 99, 31-48.

Toma, C. (2016). Online dating. En C. Berger y M. Roloff (Eds.). The international encyclopaedia of interpersonal communication (pp. 1-5). Nueva York: Wiley.

Van Nuenen, T. (2016). Scripted journeys: A study of interfaced travel writing. [PhD Dissertation]. Tilburg University, Países Bajos.

Varis, P. y Blommaert, J. (2013). Conviviality and collectives on social media: Virality, memes, and new social structures. Multilingual Margins, 2(1), 31-45.

Varis, P. y Van Nuenen, T. (2017). The internet, language, and virtual interactions. En O. Garcia, N. Flores y Spotti M. (eds.), The Oxford handbook of language and society (pp. 473-488). Nueva York: Oxford University Press.

Velghe, F. (2013). “Hallo, hoe gaan dit, wat maak jy?” Phatic communication, the mobile phone and coping strategies in a South African context. Multilingual Margins, 2(1), 10-30.

Wallerstein, I. (1983). Historical capitalism. Londres: Verso.

Wang, X. (2015). Inauthentic authenticity: Semiotic design and globalization in the margins of China. Semiotica, 203, 227-248.

Williams, G. (1992). Sociolinguistics: A sociological critique. Londres: Longman.

Yang P., Tang, L. y Wang, X. (2015). Diaosi as infrapolitics: Scatological tropes, identity-making and cultural intimacy on China’s internet. Media, Culture and Society, 37(2), 197-214.

Notas

Este artículo es parte de un proyecto que denomino “Durkheim e internet”, dedicado precisamente a transformar los hallazgos de la sociolingüística contemporánea en planteos de la teoría social. Véase Blommaert (2017) para una revisión y una primera síntesis. El caso de la integración fue presentado en la conferencia “Connecting the dots”, en la Universidad Sultán Qaboos, Omán, en noviembre de 2016. Agradezco a Najma Al Zidjaly y muchos otros participantes por las estimulantes respuestas y la discusión de las ideas que presenté allí.
Se pueden encontrar ejemplos de esto en los ensayos de Coupland (2016). El volumen está dedicado a “debates teóricos” y un aspecto destacado es que esos debates se sitúan casi exclusivamente dentro de la sociolingüística como disciplina. Sin duda, esta tarea es imprescindible; de hecho, la actualización teórica debería ser un rasgo constante de todo proyecto científico. Pero la conexión evidente entre la teoría sociolingüística y la teoría social sigue quedando muy relegada. Observemos que una forma concreta en que los sociolingüistas han procurado incorporar la teoría social en sus trabajos consiste en recurrir al puñado de teóricos sociales que sí abordaron el lenguaje en sus múltiples modos de existencia. Pensemos en Bourdieu, Foucault, Habermas, Laclau y, por supuesto, Goffman, como los casos más prominentes.
Para Mills, el término imaginación sociológica remitía a un nivel fundamental de teorización sociológica, el nivel en el que “se indaga la estructura de la sociedad moderna y dentro de esa estructura se formulan las psicologías de una diversidad de hombres y mujeres” (1959, p. 5).
Nota de trad.: mantendremos en inglés estas categorías a lo largo del artículo dada su alta frecuencia de uso en contextos de habla hispana y su mayor simplicidad en comparación con su traducción.
Esto puede, por tanto, leerse como una glosa de lo que en otros escritos describimos como superdiversidad. (Ver Blommaert, 2010; Arnaut, 2016; Blommaert y Rampton, 2016; Arnaut, Karrebaek y Spotti, 2017).
Nota de trad.: “OMG” es una sigla informal de "Oh, my God", así como “LOL” lo es "laughing out loud" y ambas son utilizadas por usuarios de redes tanto en contextos de habla inglesa como hispana. AAVE es la sigla de “African American Vernacular English”, o inglés vernáculo afroamericano.
Pensemos en los múltiples debates a lo largo del siglo XX sobre el concepto y la validez de la clase social como noción sociológica clave. Los intentos de “inventar” clases sociales nuevas o adicionales siempre fueron recibidos con hostilidad; por ejemplo, la descripción de C. Wright Mills (1951) de una incipiente clase de profesionales administrativos o la propuesta de Guy Standing (2011) de considerar al precariado como una clase en vías de surgimiento.
Fue con esta cita que Erving Goffman inició su defensa de tesis y gran parte del trabajo de Goffman se puede ver, entonces, como dedicado a los procesos básicos de sociación que Simmel delineó, desarrollados en el marco de las “formas de relación y tipos de interacción menos conspicuos”. Agradezco a Rob Moore por esta observación.
De hecho, algunos de los eventos políticos de mayor impacto en la última década fueron fenómenos relacionados con internet: Wikileaks y su publicación de documentos clasificados hackeados; los Panama Papers, que revelaron sumas escandalosas de dinero escondidas en paraísos fiscales offshore y el supuesto hackeo de las computadoras del Partido Demócrata por parte de Rusia y su posible efecto en la elección de Donald Trump como presidente en noviembre de 2016 (ver, por ejemplo, Brevini, Hintz y McCurdy, 2013). También la estrategia mediática del propio Trump está destinada a convertirse en tema de investigación en el futuro. Trump sistemáticamente rechazó lo que llamaba los medios masivos dominantes, argumentando que estaban sesgados, y financió una campaña intensiva (y basada en algoritmos) en las redes sociales, lo que lo llevó a recibir frecuentes acusaciones de fake news. Ver Maly (2016), para un primer análisis.
En Blommaert (2017), explico cómo la evidencia sociolingüística aporta pruebas conclusivas del hecho social de Durkheim –que define la posibilidad misma de una sociología y sociolingüística- y, por extensión, ofrece argumentos contundentes en contra de la elección racional y otras formas de individualismo metodológico.