figure2

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.15975

Published:

2021-05-30

Issue:

Vol. 26 No. 2 (2021): May - August

Section:

Industrial Engineering

Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos

Challenges in the Modeling of Traceability in Food Supply Chains

Authors

Keywords:

Food supply chain, traceability systems, traceability modelling, management, optimization models (en).

Keywords:

Cadena de suministro de alimentos, sistemas de trazabilidad, modelado de la trazabilidad, Gestión, optimización, simulación (es).

References

K. M. Karlsen, and P. Olsen, “Validity of method for analysing critical traceability points”, Food Control, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 1209-1215, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.01.020 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.01.020

M. N. Faisal, and F. Talib, “Implementing traceability in Indian food-supply chains: An interpretive structural modeling approach”, J. Foodserv. Bus. Res., vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 171-196, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1080/15378020.2016.1159894 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15378020.2016.1159894

M. Thakur, and C. R. Hurburgh, “Framework for implementing traceability system in the bulk grain supply chain”, J. Food Eng., vol. 95, no. 4, pp. 617-626, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2009.06. 028 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2009.06.028

F. Dabbene, P. Gay, and C. Tortia, “Traceability issues in food supply chain management: A review”, Biosyst. Eng., vol. 120, pp. 65-80, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2013.09.006 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2013.09.006

J. A. Alfaro, and L. A. Rábade, “Traceability as a strategic tool to improve inventory management: A case study in the food industry”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 118, no. 1, pp. 104-110, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2008.08.030 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2008.08.030

P. Olsen, and M. Borit, “How to define traceability”, Trends Food Sci. Technol., vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 142-150, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2012.10.003 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2012.10.003

T. A. McMeekin et al., “Information systems in food safety management”, Int. J. Food Microbiol., vol. 112, no. 3, pp. 181-194, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2006.04.048 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2006.04.048

T. Bosona, and G. Gebresenbet, “Food traceability as an integral part of logistics management in food and agricultural supply chain”, Food Control, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 32-48, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2013.02.004 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2013.02.004

X. Wang, D. Li, and C. O’Brien, “Optimisation of traceability and operations planning: An integrated model for perishable food production”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 2865-2886, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207540701725075 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00207540701725075

R. Saltini, and R. Akkerman, “Testing improvements in the chocolate traceability system: Impact on product recalls and production efficiency”, Food Control, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 221-226, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.07.015 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.07.015

R. Gautam, A. Singh, K. Karthik, S. Pandey, F. Scrimgeour, and M. K. Tiwari, “Traceability¸ using RFID and its formulation for a kiwifruit supply chain”, Comput. Ind. Eng., vol. 103, pp. 46-58, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cie.2016.09.007 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cie.2016.09.007

W. E. Soto-Silva, M. C. González-Araya, M. A. Oliva-Fernández, and L. M. Plà-Aragonés, “Optimizing fresh food logistics for processing: Application for a large Chilean apple supply chain”, Comput. Electron. Agric., vol. 136, pp. 42-57, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2017.02.020 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2017.02.020

J. A. Orjuela Castro, “Incidencia del diseño de la cadena de suministro alimentaria en el equilibrio de flujos logísticos”, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, 2018.

B. Kitchenham, “Procedures for Performing Systematic Reviews”, Technical Report TR/SE- 0401, Department of Computer Science, Keele University, UK, 2004.

D. L. Rincón, J. E. Fonseca y J. A. Orjuela-Castro, “Hacia un marco conceptual común para la trazabilidad en la cadena de suministro de alimentos”, Ingeniería, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 161-189, 2017. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2017.2.a01 DOI: https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2017.2.a01

X. Wang, D. Li, C. O’Brien, and Y. Li, “A production planning model to reduce risk and improve operations management”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 124, no. 2, pp. 463-474, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2009.12.009 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2009.12.009

J. E. Hobbs, “Transaction costs and slaughter cattle procurement: Processors’ selection of supply channels”, Agribusiness, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 509-523, 1996. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1520-6297(199611/12)12:6<509::AID-AGR2>3.0.CO;2-7 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1520-6297(199611/12)12:6<509::AID-AGR2>3.0.CO;2-7

Food Chain Strategy and Food Standards Agency, “Traceability in the Food Chain. A preliminary study”, Food Standard Agency, 2002.

E. Golan et al., “Traceability in the US food supply: Economic theory and industry studies”, Agricultural Economic Report No. 830, 2004.

K. M. Karlsen, B. Dreyer, P. Olsen, and E. O. Elvevoll, “Granularity and its role in implementation of seafood traceability”, J. Food Eng., vol. 112, no. 1-2, pp. 78-85, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2012.03.025 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2012.03.025

Icontec, “NTC-ISO 9000 Sistemas de Gestión de la Calidad - fundamentos y vocabulario”, Icontec, 2015.

M. Bertolini, M. Bevilacqua, and R. Massini, “FMECA approach to product traceability in the food industry”, Food Control, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 137-145, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2004.09.013 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2004.09.013

P. Olsen, and M. Aschan, “Reference method for analyzing material flow, information flow and information loss in food supply chains”, Trends Food Sci. Technol., vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 313-320, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2010.03.002 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2010.03.002

T. Kelepouris, K. Pramatari, and G. Doukidis, “RFID-enabled traceability in the food supply chain”, Ind. Manag. Data Syst., vol. 107, no. 2, pp. 183-200, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1108/02635570710723804 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/02635570710723804

S. Tamayo, T. Monteiro, and N. Sauer, “Deliveries optimization by exploiting production traceability information”, Eng. Appl. Artif. Intell., vol. 22, no. 4-5, pp. 557-568, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engappai.2009.02.007 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engappai.2009.02.007

A. Regattieri, M. Gamberi, and R. Manzini, “Traceability of food products: General framework and experimental evidence”, J. Food Eng., vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 347-356, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.10.032 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.10.032

B. Manos, and I. Manikas, “Article information: Traceability in the greek fresh produce sector: drivers and constraints”, Br. Food J., vol. 112, no. 6, pp. 640-652, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701011052727 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701011052727

A. Bechini, M. Cimino, F. Marcelloni, and A. Tomasi, “Patterns and technologies for enabling supply chain traceability through collaborative e-business”, Inf. Softw. Technol., vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 342-359, 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infsof.2007.02.017 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infsof.2007.02.017

EC, “Commission Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 of 29 April 2004 on the hygiene of foodstuffs”, European Parliament and of the Council, 2004.

J. van der Vorst, A. Beulens, and P. van Beek, “Innovations in logistics and ICT in food supply chain networks”, Innovations in Agri-Food Systems: Product Quality and Consumer Acceptance, Wageningen Academic Publishers, pp. 245-291, 2005.

L. A. Rábade, and J. A. Alfaro, “Buyer-supplier relationship’s influence on traceability implementation in the vegetable industry”, J. Purch. Supply Manag., vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 39-50, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pursup.2006.02.003 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pursup.2006.02.003

D. Folinas, I. Manikas, and B. Manos, “Traceability data management for food chains”, Br. Food J., vol. 108, no. 8, pp. 622-633, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070700610682319 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/00070700610682319

M. Canavari, R. Centonze, M. Hingley, and R. Spadoni, “Traceability as part of competitive strategy in the fruit supply chain”, Br. Food J., vol. 112, no. 2, pp. 171-186, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701011018851 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701011018851

W. van Rijswijk, L. J. Frewer, D. Menozzi, and G. Faioli, “Consumer perceptions of traceability: A cross-national comparison of the associated benefits”, Food Qual. Prefer., vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 452-464, 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2008.02.001 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2008.02.001

S. Khan, A. Haleem, M. I. Khan, M. H. Abidi, and A. Al-Ahmari, “Implementing traceability systems in specific supply chain management (SCM) through critical success factors (CSFs)”, Sustain., vol. 10, no. 1, 2018. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010204 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010204

F. Dabbene, and P. Gay, “Food traceability systems: Performance evaluation and optimization”, Comput. Electron. Agric., vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 139-146, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2010.10.009 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2010.10.009

J. van der Vorst, “Performance levels in food traceability and the impact on chain design: Results of an international benchmark study”, Dynamics in Chains and Networks, Wageningen Academic Press, 2004.

M. Salampasis, D. Tektonidis, and E. P. Kalogianni, “TraceALL: A semantic web framework for food traceability systems”, J. Syst. Inf. Technol., vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 302-317, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1108/13287261211279053 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/13287261211279053

J. Hu, X. Zhang, L. M. Moga, and M. Neculita, “Modeling and implementation of the vegetable supply chain traceability system”, Food Control, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 341-353, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.06.037 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.06.037

J. T. Mgonja, P. Luning, and J. van Der Vorst, “Diagnostic model for assessing traceability system performance in fish processing plants”, J. Food Eng., vol. 118, no. 2, pp. 188-197, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2013.04.009 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2013.04.009

T. Pizzuti, and G. Mirabelli, “The Global Track&Trace System for food: General framework and functioning principles”, J. Food Eng., vol. 159, pp. 16-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2015.03.001 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2015.03.001

W. Liang, J. Cao, Y. Fan, K. Zhu, and Q. Dai, “Modeling and implementation of cattle/beef supply chain traceability using a distributed RFID-based framework in China”, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 10, pp. 1-17, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139558 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139558

R. Y. Chen, “Autonomous tracing system for backward design in food supply chain”, Food Control, vol. 51, pp. 70-84, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2014.11.004 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2014.11.004

C. N. Verdouw, J. Wolfert, A. J. M. Beulens, and A. Rialland, “Virtualization of food supply chains with the internet of things”, J. Food Eng., vol. 176, pp. 128-136, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2015.11.009 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2015.11.009

H. M. Kim, and M. Laskowski, “Towards an ontology-driven blockchain design for supply chain provenance”, Intell. Syst. Accounting, Financ. Manag., vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 18-27, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1002/isaf.1424 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/isaf.1424

T. M. Fernández-Caramés, and P. Fraga-Lamas, “A Review on the Use of Blockchain for the Internet of Things”, IEEE Access, vol. 6, pp. 32979-33001. https://doi.org/10.1109/access.2018.2842685 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2018.2842685

F. Dabbene, P. Gay, and N. Sacco, “Optimisation of fresh-food supply chains in uncertain environments, Part I: Background and methodology”, Biosyst. Eng., vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 348-359, 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2007.11.011 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2007.11.011

X. Zhang, J. Zhang, F. Liu, Z. Fu, and W. Mu, “Strengths and limitations on the operating mechanisms of traceability system in agro food, China”, Food Control, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 825-829, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2009.10.015 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2009.10.015

A. Chaudhuri, S. Srivastava, R. K. Srivastava, and Z. Parveen, “Risk propagation and its impact on performance in food processing supply chain: A fuzzy interpretive structural modeling based approach”, J. Model. Manag., vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 660-693, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1108/JM2-08-2014-0065 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/JM2-08-2014-0065

M. Balaji, and K. Arshinder, “Modeling the causes of food wastage in Indian perishable food supply chain”, Resour. Conserv. Recycl., vol. 114, pp. 153-167, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2016.07.016 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2016.07.016

R. Shankar, R. Gupta, and D. K. Pathak, “Modeling critical success factors of traceability for food logistics system”, Transp. Res. Part E Logist. Transp. Rev., vol. 119, pp. 205-222, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tre.2018.03.006 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tre.2018.03.006

A. Rong, R. Akkerman, and M. Grunow, “An optimization approach for managing fresh food quality throughout the supply chain”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 131, no. 1, pp. 421-429, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2009.11.026 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2009.11.026

J. Yu, M. Gan, S. Ni, and D. Chen, “Multi-objective models and real case study for dual- channel FAP supply chain network design with fuzzy information”, J. Intell. Manuf., vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 389-403, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10845-015-1115-8 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10845-015-1115-8

C. Dupuy, V. Botta-Genoulaz, and A. Guinet, “Batch dispersion model to optimise traceability in food industry”, J. Food Eng., vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 333-339, 2005. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2004.05.074 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2004.05.074

D. Li, D. Kehoe, and P. Drake, “Dynamic planning with a wireless product identification technology in food supply chains”, Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., vol. 30, no. 9-10, pp. 938-944, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-005-0066-1 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-005-0066-1

M. Thakur, L.Wang, and C. R. Hurburgh, “A multi-objective optimization approach to balancing cost and traceability in bulk grain handling”, J. Food Eng., vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 193-200, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2010.07. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2010.07.001

O. Ahumada, and J. R. Villalobos, “Operational model for planning the harvest and distribution of perishable agricultural products”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 133, no. 2, pp. 677-687, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.05.015 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.05.015

X. Wang, and D. Li, “A dynamic product quality evaluation based pricing model for perishable food supply chains”, Omega, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 906-917, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.omega.2012.02.001 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.omega.2012.02.001

S. Piramuthu, P. Farahani, and M. Grunow, “RFID-generated traceability for contaminated product recall in perishable food supply networks”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 225, no. 2, pp. 253-262, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.09.024 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.09.024

M. Yu, and A. Nagurney, “Competitive food supply chain networks with application to fresh produce”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 224, no. 2, pp. 273-282, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.07.033 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.07.033

M. Hertog, I. Uysal, U. McCarthy, B. M. Verlinden, and B. M. Nicolaï, “Shelf life modelling for first-expiredfirst- out warehouse management”, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., vol. 372, no. 2017. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2013.0306 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2013.0306

G. Aiello, M. Enea, and C. Muriana, “The expected value of the traceability information”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 244, no. 1, pp. 176-186, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2015.01.028 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2015.01.028

H. Dai, M. M. Tseng, and P. H. Zipkin, “Design of traceability systems for product recall”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 511-531, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2014.955922 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2014.955922

D. Li, and X. Wang, “Dynamic supply chain decisions based on networked sensor data: an application in the chilled food retail chain”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 55, no. 17, pp. 5127-5141, 2017. https://doi.org/10. 1080/00207543.2015.1047976 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2015.1047976

A. Mohammed, Q. Wang, and X. Li, “A study in integrity of an RFID-monitoring HMSC” Int. J. Food Prop., vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 1145-1158, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/10942912.2016.1203933 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10942912.2016.1203933

J. Dai, L. Fan, N. Lee, and J. Li, “Joint optimisation of tracking capability and price in a supply chain with endogenous pricing”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 55, no. 18, pp. 5465-5484, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2017.1321800 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2017.1321800

D. M. Sourza Monteiro, “Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of the Economics of Traceability Adoption in Food Supply Chains”, Doctoral Dissertations Available from Proquest, 2007.

J. van der Vorst, S.-O. Tromp, and D.-J. van der Zee, “Simulation modelling for food supply chain redesign; integrated decision making on product quality, sustainability and logistics”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 47, no. 23, pp. 6611-6631, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207540802356747 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00207540802356747

J. van der Vorst, A. J. M. Beulens, and P. van Beek, “Modelling and simulating multi-echelon food systems”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 122, pp. 354-366, 2000. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0377-2217(99)00238-6 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0377-2217(99)00238-6

J. Sterman, Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World, McGraw Hill. 2000.

L. A. Santa-Eulalia, G. Halladjian, S. D’Amours, and J.-M. Frayret, “Integrated methodological frameworks for modeling agent-based advanced supply chain planning systems: A systematic literature review”, J. Ind. Eng. Manag., vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 624-668, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.3926/jiem.326 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3926/jiem.326

R. Saltini, R. Akkerman, and S. Frosch, “Optimizing chocolate production through traceability: A review of the influence of farming practices on cocoa bean quality”, Food Control, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 167-187, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.05.054 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.05.054

M. M. Herrera y J. A. Orjuela, “Perspectiva de trazabilidad en la cadena de suministros de frutas: un enfoque desde la dinámica de sistemas”, Ingeniería, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 236-247, 2014. DOI: https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2014.2.a03

H. Ge, R. Gray, and J. Nolan, “Agricultural supply chain optimization and complexity: A comparison of analytic vs simulated solutions and policie”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 159, pp. 208-220, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.09.023 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.09.023

M. M. Herrera, L. Vargas, and D. Contento, “Modeling the traceability and recovery processes in the closedloop supply chain and their effects”, J. Figueroa-García, E. López-Santana, J. Rodriguez-Molano (eds), Applied Computer Sciences in Engineering, CCIS, vol. 915, pp. 328-339, Springer, 2018. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00350-0_28

G. La Scalia, R. Micale, P. P. Miglietta, and P. Toma, “Reducing waste and ecological impacts through a sustainable and efficient management of perishable food based on the Monte Carlo simulation”, Ecol. Indic., vol. 97, pp. 363-371, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.10.041 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.10.041

I. Gunawan, I. Vanany, and E. Widodo, “Cost-benefit model in improving traceability system: Case study in Indonesian bulk-liquid industry”, Supply Chain Forum, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 145-157, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1080/16258312.2019.1570671 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/16258312.2019.1570671

J. Kleijnen, and M. Smits, “Performance metrics in supply chain management”, J. Oper. Res. Soc., vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 507-514, 2003. https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jors.2601539 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jors.2601539

I. Anica-Popa, “Food traceability systems and information sharing in food supply chain ionu¸t Anica-Popa”, Manag. Mark. Challenges Knowl. Soc., vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 749-758, 2012.

J. Qian, B. Dai, B. Wang, Y. Zha, and Q. Song, “Traceability in food processing: Problems, methods, and performance evaluations - a review”, Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr., vol. 0, no. 0, pp. 1-14, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2020.1825925 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2020.1825925

W. E. Soto-Silva, E. Nadal-Roig, M. C. González-Araya, and L. M. Pla-Aragones, “Operational research models applied to the fresh fruit supply chain”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 251, no. 2, pp. 345- 355, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2015.08.046 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2015.08.046

L. A. Sanabria, A. M. Peralta, and J. A. Orjuela, “Modelos de localización para cadenas agroalimentarias perecederas: una revisión al estado del arte”, Ingeniería, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 23-45, 2017. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2017.1.a04 DOI: https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2017.1.a04

J. Qian, B. Fan, X.Wu, S. Han, S. Liu, and X. Yang, “Comprehensive and quantifiable granularity: A novel model to measure agro-food traceability”, Food Control, vol. 74, pp. 98-106, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2016.11.034 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2016.11.034

B. Dai, Y. Nu, X. Xie, and J. Li, “Interactions of traceability and reliability optimization in a competitive supply chain with product recall”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 290, no. 1, pp. 116-131, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2020.08.003 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2020.08.003

How to Cite

APA

Maya, T., Orjuela Castro, J. A., & Herrera, M. M. (2021). Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos. Ingeniería, 26(2), 143–172. https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.15975

ACM

[1]
Maya, T., Orjuela Castro, J.A. and Herrera, M.M. 2021. Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos. Ingeniería. 26, 2 (May 2021), 143–172. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.15975.

ACS

(1)
Maya, T.; Orjuela Castro, J. A.; Herrera, M. M. Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos. Ing. 2021, 26, 143-172.

ABNT

MAYA, T.; ORJUELA CASTRO, J. A.; HERRERA, M. M. Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos. Ingeniería, [S. l.], v. 26, n. 2, p. 143–172, 2021. DOI: 10.14483/23448393.15975. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/reving/article/view/15975. Acesso em: 21 may. 2022.

Chicago

Maya, Tatiana, Javier Arturo Orjuela Castro, and Milton Mauricio Herrera. 2021. “Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos”. Ingeniería 26 (2):143-72. https://doi.org/10.14483/23448393.15975.

Harvard

Maya, T., Orjuela Castro, J. A. and Herrera, M. M. (2021) “Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos”, Ingeniería, 26(2), pp. 143–172. doi: 10.14483/23448393.15975.

IEEE

[1]
T. Maya, J. A. Orjuela Castro, and M. M. Herrera, “Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos”, Ing., vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 143–172, May 2021.

MLA

Maya, T., J. A. Orjuela Castro, and M. M. Herrera. “Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos”. Ingeniería, vol. 26, no. 2, May 2021, pp. 143-72, doi:10.14483/23448393.15975.

Turabian

Maya, Tatiana, Javier Arturo Orjuela Castro, and Milton Mauricio Herrera. “Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos”. Ingeniería 26, no. 2 (May 30, 2021): 143–172. Accessed May 21, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/reving/article/view/15975.

Vancouver

1.
Maya T, Orjuela Castro JA, Herrera MM. Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos. Ing. [Internet]. 2021May30 [cited 2022May21];26(2):143-72. Available from: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/reving/article/view/15975

Download Citation

Visitas

570

Dimensions


PlumX


Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Recibido: 24 de febrero de 2020; Revisión recibida: 5 de diciembre de 2020; Aceptado: 21 de diciembre de 2020

Resumen

Contexto:

Los intereses en los hábitos alimentarios de los consumidores han vuelto relevante el acceso a la información relacionada con un producto, donde toma relevancia la trazabilidad en la cadena de suministro de alimentos (TCSA).

Método:

Para identificar los principales focos problemáticos y los retos a enfrentar en los sistemas de trazabilidad y el modelado de la TCSA, se realizó una revisión sistemática de la literatura en la que se analizaron 84 artículos y se presentaron diferentes taxonomías sobre modelos de gestión, modelos de optimización y modelos de simulación, luego se realizó una discusión sobre retos y futuros focos en el modelado de trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos (CSA).

Resultados:

Se identificaron limitaciones en el tipo de decisiones analizadas (tácticas y operativas), asimetrías en el flujo de información entre eslabones, falta de modelos robustos, relevancia de la gestión de la información como instrumento de integración, vacíos en la medición de políticas de gestión tecnológica en la trazabilidad, necesidad de modelos holísticos y brechas en la relación entre trazabilidad y sostenibilidad.

Conclusiones:

Hace falta el desarrollo de modelos basados en la gestión de tecnologías, los sistemas de trazabilidad que faciliten las relaciones y los flujos entre los diferentes actores, el desarrollo de modelos de gestión logística sostenible que involucren la trazabilidad, la utilización de enfoques multicriterio relacionando múltiples eslabones y cuantificar diferentes medidas de desempeño de la CSA para maximizar los beneficios de la trazabilidad mediante modelos multiobjetivo.

Palabras clave:

cadena de suministro de alimentos, sistemas de trazabilidad, modelado de la trazabilidad, gestión, optimización, simulación..

Abstract

Context:

Changes in consumers’ eating interests have made the access to information related to specific products relevant, where food supply chain traceability (FSCT) has acquired a significant importance.

Method:

In order to identify the main issues and challenges in traceability systems and FSCT modeling, a systematic literature review was conducted, in which 84 articles were analyzed, and different taxonomies were presented for management, optimization, and simulation models. Then, a discussion was carried out about the challenges and future issues in FSCT modeling.

Results:

Limitations were identified in the types of decisions analyzed (tactical and operational), as well as an asymmetric flow of information between links, a lack of robust models, the relevance of information management as an integration tool, gaps in the measurement of technological management policies regarding traceability, the need for holistic models, and gaps in the relationship between traceability and sustainability.

Conclusions:

It is necessary to develop models based on technology management, as well as traceability systems that facilitate relations and flows between the different actors, the development of sustainable logistics management models involving traceability, the use of multi-criteria approaches relating multiple links, and quantifying different performance measurements in FSC to maximize the benefits of traceability by means of multi-objective models.

Keywords:

food supply chain, traceability systems, traceability modeling, management, optimization models..

Introducción

Los requisitos para documentar los productos alimenticios son cada vez mayores, se ha aprobado una amplia legislación nacional e internacional para garantizar la seguridad alimentaria, y tanto la industria como los consumidores también están cada vez más interesados en conocimientos adicionales sobre el origen, los procesos y otras propiedades del producto [1]. Lo anterior ha hecho que en los últimos años los sistemas de trazabilidad, entendidos como la “totalidad de datos y operaciones que es capaz de mantener la información deseada sobre un producto y sus componentes a través de toda o parte de su cadena de producción y utilización” (ISO 22005: 2007) [2], hayan tomado relevancia por las implicaciones que tienen en el desempeño de las cadenas de suministro (CS), independientemente del sistema de producción y el tipo de alimento [3]. De esta forma, la trazabilidad es esencial para las compañías, por diferentes razones, entre las que se encuentran el cumplimiento de la normatividad vigente, los estándares internacionales, los requisitos de certificación, la implementación de estrategias y programas de marketing, la certificación de origen del producto, la identidad, la calidad y garantizar la seguridad alimentaria con métodos eficaces para responder a los problemas de identificación y seguridad sanitaria de los alimentos [4].

La trazabilidad no es la información del producto y el proceso en sí, sino una herramienta que permite encontrar esta información nuevamente en un momento posterior [1], por lo tanto, el sistema de trazabilidad se convierte en un elemento fundamental que mejora el desempeño de la CSA, que contribuye en varios aspectos, tales como: i) integridad de los alimentos, ii) mitigación de los problemas que conlleva la adulteración y iii) favorecimiento de la posición en el mercado con características distintivas de calidad e inocuidad [5]. La trazabilidad no es un término trivial, la revisión de la literatura muestra que incluso en las revistas científicas existe confusión e incoherencia [6]. Estudios previos han tratado de estructurar una definición unificada de trazabilidad; sin embargo, no se ha logrado llegar a una definición clara para la CSA, tal como lo afirman Dabbene et al. [4]. De igual forma, la CSA es tratada por separado de los sistemas de trazabilidad, sin tener en cuenta que ambas coexisten, a pesar de que en cada eslabón pueden funcionar de forma independiente, el impacto final no es mutuamente excluyente [7]. Dicha falta de relación es evidente al observar la atención que ha recibido la trazabilidad en la última década en relación con su capacidad para impulsar la conectividad de la información en la CS y reforzar el proceso logístico, así como la gestión de CSA en su conjunto [8].

En los últimos años, los aspectos de la trazabilidad se han reconocido como una herramienta fundamental para garantizar la seguridad y la calidad de los alimentos; por lo que el diseño e implementación de un sistema de trazabilidad requiere un replanteamiento y una reorganización exhaustiva de toda la CSA [4], esta necesidad resalta nuevamente la conexión entre la trazabilidad y la gestión de la CS, la cual ha sido tratada desde hace algunos años. Por ejemplo, Wang et al. presentan un modelo integrado de planificación de operaciones y trazabilidad para la gestión de alimentos perecederos [9], Thakur y Hurburgh modelan el intercambio de información entre actores en la cadena de suministro de granos [3], Saltini y Akkerman simulan diferentes escenarios para evaluar el impacto de la profundidad y la estrategia de un sistema de trazabilidad en la eficiencia de la producción y el retiro del producto [10], Gautam et al. modelan los efectos de implementar un sistema de trazabilidad basado en RFID [11]; estos trabajos resaltan la importancia de profundizar en la conexión existente entre la trazabilidad y la gestión de la CSA, conexión dada por las propiedades únicas que la CSA tiene, como son: la perecibilidad, las estrictas regulaciones, las limitaciones operativas. Preservar la frescura y la calidad del producto requiere plazos de entrega limitados, condiciones de almacenamiento controladas, lo que deriva en mejor calidad y minimiza las pérdidas debidas al deterioro [12]. Esta situación implica entender la dinámica de flujos de información y material que ocurren en la CS. En este sentido, diferentes autores han desarrollado modelos que contribuyen a representar la relación dinámica de flujos de información y material a lo largo de la cadena [3]. Si bien, existen diferentes estudios que emplean el modelamiento para el diseño e implementación de los sistemas de trazabilidad, aún no se han identificado las potencialidades del modelado de los sistemas de trazabilidad en la CSA, lo cual es indispensable si se tiene en cuenta que los sistemas de trazabilidad de alimentos impactan en la eficiencia y la efectividad de la CS [2], así como en la calidad y la capacidad de respuesta [13].

En este contexto, se requiere una revisión sistemática de la literatura que permita identificar dichas potencialidades y contribuya a entender las implicaciones del modelamiento de los sistemas de trazabilidad en el desempeño de la CSA desde diferentes enfoques, logrando tener un acercamiento a la conexión entre trazabilidad y gestión de la cadena de suministro desde el modelado.

A través de una revisión sistemática de la literatura, este artículo discute tres aspectos que inciden en el modelado de la trazabilidad en la CSA: i) conceptualización de la trazabilidad, ii) sistemas de trazabilidad y iii) diferentes enfoques de modelado de la trazabilidad en la CSA. Además, el artículo contribuye con identificar los focos problemáticos en los sistemas de trazabilidad de la CSA y los retos que enfrenta el modelado de la trazabilidad en la CSA. La metodología utilizada en la revisión de literatura se presenta a continuación. Luego se presentan los resultados obtenidos de la revisión sistemática de forma organizada en dos subsecciones: a) conceptualización de la trazabilidad y b) taxonomía propuesta para identificar los enfoques con los cuales se han abordado los sistemas de trazabilidad en la CSA. Adicionalmente, se muestran diferentes enfoques de modelado de la trazabilidad en la CSA: modelos de gestión, enfoques en técnicas de optimización y de simulación, lo cual permite una taxonomía general sobre el modelado de la trazabilidad en las CSA. Más adelante, se presentan los trabajos futuros identificados a partir de la revisión de la literatura, determinando vacíos del conocimiento (gaps), focos problemáticos y retos a enfrentar en futuras investigaciones.

Metodología

La revisión sistemática de la literatura se apoya en las metodologías propuestas por Kitchenham [14] y Rincón et al. [15] para resolver las siguientes preguntas de investigación: ¿Cuáles han sido los principales enfoques a través de los cuales se ha investigado la trazabilidad en la CSA? ¿Cuáles han sido las principales técnicas utilizadas para el modelado de la trazabilidad en la CSA? ¿Qué métodos de solución se han utilizado para optimizar la trazabilidad en la CSA? ¿Qué implicaciones y retos conlleva el modelado de los sistemas de trazabilidad en la CSA? La Tabla I presenta la secuencia de pasos adoptados para la revisión sistemática, la cual permite identificar, evaluar e interpretar la literatura relevante para posteriormente determinar los posibles impactos del modelado de los sistemas de trazabilidad de la CSA en su gestión y su desempeño.

Tabla I: Pasos secuenciales de la revisión de la literatura

Resultados

Es esta sección se presentan los resultados obtenidos a partir de la revisión de la literatura que comprende las principales definiciones de trazabilidad y se establece una posición teórica, luego se presentan los enfoques que han sido abordados para los sistemas de trazabilidad. Posteriormente, se propone una breve taxonomía de los enfoques de modelado en la TCSA, esta parte se divide en: modelos de gestión de la CSA relacionados con trazabilidad, modelos con técnicas de optimización y modelos de simulación.

A partir del año 2009 se evidencia un crecimiento en el número de publicaciones con respecto al modelado de la trazabilidad en la CSA, destacándose un incremento para los años 2011 y 2015, como ilustra la Figura 1. Gracias a esto la literatura ha desarrollado diferentes corrientes de investigación en trazabilidad de alimentos, entre las que se destacan: el desarrollo de sistemas de trazabilidad eficaces respaldados por diversas tecnologías de identificación de productos, el uso de información de trazabilidad para mejorar la gestión de la CS y el uso de enfoques de gestión de operaciones para mejorar la gestión de la trazabilidad [16]. En esta última corriente de investigación autores como Dupuy et al. (2005), Bertolini et al. (2006)), Thakur et al. (2010), Wang et al. (2012), Dai et al. (2015), Li y Wang ( 2017), Gautam et al. ( 2017), Yu et al. (2018) y Dai et al. (2020), entre otros, buscan mejorar la gestión de la trazabilidad mediante el enfoque de gestión de operaciones y reafirman la necesidad de desarrollar nuevos enfoques metodológicos que permitan realizar análisis estructurados de trazabilidad [16]. Esto demuestra la importancia del modelamiento en los sistemas de trazabilidad y denota la necesidad de diseñar modelos que permitan abordar los problemas y retos que implica la adopción de tecnologías de trazabilidad en la última década.

Tendencia historia de las publicaciones en la temática

Figura 1: Tendencia historia de las publicaciones en la temática

El mayor número de publicaciones de trazabilidad en la CSA, en las bases de datos consultadas, se presenta entre 2015 y 2019, como ilustra la Figura 2. El número de publicaciones muestra la relevancia en términos de contribuciones a la investigación alcanzada en la última década. Esto implica un interés creciente en el modelado para el desarrollo y la adopción de sistemas de trazabilidad en la CSA.

Publicaciones por bases de datos consultadas

Figura 2: Publicaciones por bases de datos consultadas

De los documentos seleccionados a partir de la revisión sistemática, el 63% corresponde a artículos de investigación, el 8% a revisiones de la literatura y el restante a artículos de conferencias.

Los autores identificados en la ventana de observación (2009-2019) más relevantes, de acuerdo con el número de publicaciones sobre TCSA son de: Xiaoshuan Zhang, Zetian Fu, LinhaiWu, Jianping Quian y Lingling Xu de China, Petter Olsen, Kine Karlsen y Kathyn Donnelly de Noruega, Wim Verbeke de Bélgica, Giovanni Mirabelli, Teresa Pizzuti y Luigi Patrono de Italia, Liliana Moga de Polonia, Jack van der Vorst de Países Bajos y Maitri Thakur y Tejas Bhatt de Estados Unidos. En este contexto, el mayor número de publicaciones identificadas han sido elaboradas para países desarrollados, lo cual muestra la necesidad de investigación para los países de Latinoamérica en particular.

Conceptualización de la trazabilidad

En el primer artículo de TCSA, publicado en 1996 y escrito por Hobbs [17], se resalta la importancia de la trazabilidad para la seguridad alimentaria y se enfatiza en los costos derivados del monitoreo realizado a la trazabilidad. A partir de 2002 se presentó un aumento considerable en el número de publicaciones con respecto a los alimentos, en particular después de una serie de incidentes relacionados con la inocuidad de los alimentos durante los cuales se demostró que los sistemas de trazabilidad eran débiles o ausentes [18]. El desarrollo de estos incidentes, así como la aparición de brotes sanitarios produjeron que diferentes países desarrollaran e implementaran requisitos legales sobre trazabilidad, definiendo métodos y autoridades de control para monitorear productos alimenticios no seguros [4]. Esta nueva legislación llevó a que las empresas se interesaran en el tema y desarrollaran sistemas de trazabilidad eficientes. Sin embargo, es importante resaltar que existen casos en los que se implementó la trazabilidad en forma temprana, antes de ser un requisito legal, esto motivado por el aumento de los ingresos generados por sistemas de distribución de menor costo, la reducción de gastos de retiro de productos y las ventas ampliadas de productos con alta seguridad y calidad [19].

La trazabilidad ha tomado relevancia en diferentes campos, tales como: tecnológico, social y administrativo [8], [15]. Diferentes autores han definido la trazabilidad; sin embargo, no hay una definición clara para la CSA, impidiendo un marco conceptual común de trazabilidad [15], [20].

La ISO 8402-1994 define la trazabilidad como: “La capacidad de rastrear el historial, la aplicación o la ubicación de una entidad mediante identificaciones registradas” [21], esta misma definición fue adoptada por [20], [22], [23] y [24], en esta se resalta la importancia de disponer de la información histórica del producto. En este mismo enfoque, Tamayo [25] define la trazabilidad como la capacidad para rastrear bienes a lo largo de la cadena de distribución con base en un número de lote o número de serie [25], adicionalmente Regattieri [26] afirma que la trazabilidad permite el rastreo de los productos, convirtiéndose en el registro de la historia de un producto. Manos y Manikas [27] entienden la trazabilidad como la capacidad de rastrear el historial del producto a través de la CS hacia o desde el lugar y el momento de la producción, incluida la identificación de los insumos utilizados y las operaciones realizadas. Mientras Olsen y Borit [6] plantean una definición más general, definiéndola como la capacidad de acceder a cualquiera o toda la información relacionada con el producto que se está controlando, a lo largo de todo su ciclo de vida, por medio de la identificación y el registro. La definición con mayor difusión es: “la trazabilidad es la capacidad para seguir históricamente una aplicación o localización de algo que este bajo consideración u observación” [21], concepto general y ambiguo del término de trazabilidad.

La Tabla II presenta un resumen de las principales definiciones de trazabilidad identificadas a partir de la revisión de literatura. Estas definiciones evidencian la existencia de tres conceptos clave: rastreo, seguimiento e información. El seguimiento es la capacidad de seguir el camino de un producto a lo largo de la CS, mientras que el rastreo se refiere a la capacidad de determinar el origen y las características de un producto en particular, obtenido al referirse a los registros mantenidos en la CS [28]. Para este artículo se adopta la siguiente definición: “la trazabilidad es la capacidad de rastrear y seguir un alimento y su unidad trazable previamente identificada, por medio de registros físicos o digitales a lo largo de toda la CS para el control y localización en cualquier momento a lo largo del ciclo de vida de dicha unidad, que permita la toma de decisiones” [15], ya que contempla de forma explícita la capacidad de rastrear y seguir un alimento y mantener los registros físicos o digitales de estos, información que estará disponible a lo largo de toda la CSA.

Tabla II: Definiciones de trazabilidad

Sistemas de trazabilidad

La naturaleza compleja del procesamiento de alimentos y la captura del volumen masivo de información han dificultado la implementación de la trazabilidad [35]. Estas complejidades requerían tecnologías y métodos avanzados para capturar datos de alta calidad sobre el producto y el proceso de producción. Si bien el registro de la información en sí no es difícil, en la práctica, obtener acceso a la información más adelante puede ser un desafío [6]. Por ejemplo, rastrear un producto terminado desde todos sus ingredientes y materias primas junto con todos los registros asociados resultará en una cantidad abrumadora de información, difícil de comunicar o analizar [23]. Como los sistemas de trazabilidad pueden archivar y comunicar información sobre la calidad del producto, el origen y la seguridad del consumidor se convierten en herramienta indispensable de trazabilidad, ya que almacenan y proporcionan información en tiempo real sobre la ubicación y la historia del producto en la CSA [32], [36] y [37].

La Tabla III presenta los artículos más destacados que abordan y discuten temas relacionados con los sistemas de trazabilidad (ST), se presenta una clasificación basada en el diseño y la implementación de sistemas de trazabilidad, es decir los modelos, arquitecturas, metodologías o enfoques implementados. También, se consideraron trabajos enfocados en la validación o mejora de ST ya existentes. La mayor cantidad de documentos se concentran en el diseño e implementación de los ST. En este sentido, implica la necesidad de modelar la integración de las tecnologías de trazabilidad a lo largo de la CSA y evidenciar los efectos en su desempeño.

Tabla III: Los sistemas de trazabilidad en la literatura

(DI: Diseño e implementación de un ST, VM: Validación o mejora de un ST)

Modelado de la trazabilidad en la cadena de suministro de alimentos

La literatura con enfoques o técnicas de modelado y optimización de la trazabilidad ha sido ampliamente estudiada [4]. El objetivo del proceso de modelado del ST es describir el comportamiento del producto como una colección de procesos interactivos, de manera que su acción combinada pueda describir el fenómeno observado y que cada subproceso pueda entenderse completamente para su descripción [47]. Por medio de la revisión de literatura se ha identificado que la TCSA se ha modelado a partir de diferentes enfoques.

Modelos para la gestión de la cadena de suministro con trazabilidad

La trazabilidad aumenta la eficiencia de la CSA al reducir los costos de las actividades relacionadas con la distribución de productos alimenticios [19]. Un ST adecuado puede contribuir a la competitividad de los eslabones de la CSA [5], [48]. Varios autores han planteado metodologías que facilitan la gestión de la cadena de suministro (GCS), identifican factores que influyen en la gestión de la trazabilidad en la CS. Por ejemplo, Karlsen et al. [1] discuten el efecto de diferentes niveles de granularidad en los desempeños del ST a través de la identificación de puntos críticos de trazabilidad en la CSA. Estudios posteriores de Karlsen y Olsen [20] analizan la validez de los métodos cualitativos en ST. En esta vía, Faisal y Talib [2] proponen una metodología basada en un enfoque de modelado estructural interpretativo (ISM, por sus siglas en inglés) para determinar y comprender las interacciones entre las diversas variables de la TCSA y el orden de prioridad. Paralelamente, Chaudhuri et al. [49] desarrollan una metodología de ISM difuso (Fuzzy ISM) y la multiplicación de referencia cruzada en una matriz de impacto aplicada en una clasificación (MICMAC) para identificar riesgos que afectan la CS. Este trabajo propone un mapa de propagación del riesgo en la CS respecto a la trazabilidad.

Balaji y Arshinder [50] identifican las causas del desperdicio de alimentos, así como el poder impulsor y la dependencia de las causas en el análisis de las interacciones entre ellas, con un enfoque basado en MICMAC difuso y modelado estructural interpretativo total (TISM). Identifican 16 variables causales del desperdicio de alimentos. En esta vía, Khan et al. [35] desarrollaron un modelo basado en la relación contextual entre los factores críticos de éxito (CSF) a través del enfoque del TISM. Identifican 12 CSF con base en una revisión de la literatura y la opinión de los expertos, el modelo estructural se analizó mediante el método Fuzzy MICMAC. Shakar et al. [51] desarrollaron un marco integral para la implementación de un sistema logístico de alimentos basado en la trazabilidad, sobre la base de la teoría del CSF y el enfoque de múltiples partes interesadas en la garantía de calidad, postularon un modelo jerárquico para representar la interrelación entre los CSF estadísticamente significativos.

Modelado de trazabilidad con técnicas de optimización

La planificación de operaciones y los problemas de diseño en la industria alimentaria a menudo están relacionados con la elección de materias primas, o la cantidad y el tamaño de los lotes, entre otros. Los modelos de programación lineal entera mixta (MILP) o de programación no lineal (MINLP) se utilizan con frecuencia para tales problemas con una clara función objetivo cuantitativa u objetivos cuantitativos multicriterio [9]; en los últimos años en dichos problemas de diseño se han empezado a considerar los sistemas de trazabilidad, ya que en CSA las características son diferentes a las demás, garantizar el seguimiento, el control y la localización del alimento a lo largo de la cadena y la disponibilidad de toda la información relacionada en cualquier momento permite mejorar el desempeño de la cadena y la satisfacción del cliente. En este contexto, se evidencia que en los modelos de optimización, la inclusión de características específicas de los alimentos no es suficientemente abordada [52], lo limita la gestión de ST, la adopción de tecnologías y el uso de información proporcionada para la toma de decisiones.

En técnicas de optimización en la CS orientadas a mejorar la trazabilidad y minimizar los costos, la teoría está bastante desarrollada [4]. Sin embargo, se requieren modelos que aborden los problemas de seguridad y calidad de alimentos con sistemas de trazabilidad y los relacione con los factores de operación en la cadena, para la mejora de las operaciones y el desempeño de la trazabilidad de forma conjunta [16]. Se evidencia la necesidad de que la gestión de la trazabilidad en los alimentos permita comunicar la información a los consumidores y otras partes interesadas [8], aspectos a considerar a la hora de modelar. Por otro lado, si se considera el grado de incertidumbre, el número de enlaces intermedios y eslabones en la CS, la demanda y los costos logísticos difusos, el modelo debe contemplar la imprecisión y los retardos en la información a lo largo de la CS [53]. En este contexto se han utilizado técnicas que abordan las relaciones complejas generadas a lo largo de la CS y se ha enfatizado en la importancia del uso de sistemas de trazabilidad que garanticen la disponibilidad y la calidad de la información. La Tabla IV presenta los principales modelos de optimización aplicados para el análisis de trazabilidad. Se muestran las técnicas de optimización de mayor uso en la literatura, tales como MILP, MINLP, programación dinámica (DP) o programación estocástica (SP), se evidencia la necesidad de contemplar la incertidumbre y la complejidad, en términos de modelado del ST.

Tabla IV: Principales modelos de optimización que involucran trazabilidad

Mohammed [65] es el autor con mayor número de citas, mientras Dupuy [54] es el primero en abordar el problema del tamaño de lote apropiado y las reglas de mezcla para mejorar el desempeño del ST. En 2009, Wang [9] propone un modelo de optimización integrado, se desarrolla en un contexto de producción por lotes, donde un lote de producto terminado podría producirse a partir de varios lotes de materia prima heterogéneos con diferentes características de precio o riesgo, se concluye que la clasificación del riesgo por cada lote de materia prima influye de manera considerable en el desempeño de la cadena. En 2010,Wang [16] modifica el modelo introduciendo funciones de riesgo relacionadas con la seguridad alimentaria. Los dos trabajos publicados por Wang, junto con el trabajo en 2008 de Dabbene [47] y el de Thakur [56] en 2010 se consideran las publicaciones seminales en el modelado de la trazabilidad desde un enfoque de optimización.

En 2006, Van der Vorst [30] señaló la necesidad de enfocarse en la complejidad total de las CSA, por lo que sugiere que deben ser analizadas como una estructura en red. Este concepto es argumentado por Nagurney en 1999, quien proponía la teoría económica de redes, la cual proporcionó un marco matemático para la CS, su representación y análisis gráfico [67]. En el mismo concepto, Dabbene [47] en 2008 plantea que el proceso de trazabilidad en producción puede modelarse como un gráfico interconectado, donde los lotes de materias primas se representan como nodos y los arcos representan operaciones de mezcla que conducen a productos finales. Posteriormente en 2018, Yu et al. [53] también plantean la cadena de suministro de alimentos perecederos como una red, mediante un grafo que considera el grado de incertidumbre causado por el número de enlaces intermedios y eslabones que componen la CSA. Varios modelos aplican la optimización entera mixta, por la característica de las variables, tales como el seguimiento de los cambios, los orígenes de los alimentos y la vida útil [9]. Sin embargo, teniendo en cuenta que la demanda y los costos logísticos son imprecisos, es necesario formular el diseño de la cadena de suministro de alimentos perecederos teniendo en cuenta la incertidumbre y la información difusa [53]. En la Tabla V se muestra el método de solución y las consideraciones especiales de cada formulación.

Tabla V: Métodos de solución y consideraciones especiales

En la Tabla VI se presenta la clasificación de las funciones objetivo. En la mayoría maximizan la ganancia, el ingreso neto o el valor presente neto [12], algunos autores plantean maximizar la rentabilidad de cada empresa participante en la CSA [60]. Dai et al. [63], en 2015, es el primero en incluir las asimetrías en los incentivos recibidos por los diferentes eslabones de la CS al integrar la trazabilidad, aspecto de relevancia al incluir a todas las partes interesadas, lo que permitiría obtener el mayor beneficio para la cadena en general [4]. Sin embargo, desarrollar sistemas de trazabilidad detallados no es fácil para los eslabones más pequeños, ya que carecen de capacidad financiera, información de trazabilidad adecuada y conocimientos suficientes para implementarla [8], por lo que los beneficios netos recibidos de manera específica por cada eslabón suelen ser bastante desequilibrados en comparación a otros.

Tabla VI: Funciones objetivo planteadas en los modelos de optimización

Se observa que la mayoría de las publicaciones considera factores de degradación o deterioro, se tiene tradición en la integración de los efectos de pérdida de valor en los modelos matemáticos desarrollados [49], [58], [61], [62], [65], [69]. Otros tienen en cuenta el retiro o recuperación de productos deteriorados o contaminados, en este enfoque lo esencial es identificar el origen de riesgo y retirar todos los productos que no puedan identificarse claramente como seguros [67]. En 2017, Dai et al. [67] identifican el origen de riesgo, involucrando la mayor cantidad de eslabones de la CS; la integración de todos los actores permitirá la identificación y el rastreo efectivo de productos. El 35% de los trabajos estudia dos eslabones, otro 35% tres y cerca de un 30% cuatro. La Tabla VII muestra los eslabones tenidos en cuenta en los modelos. En la mayoría de los estudios, la cadena no es abordada en su totalidad, lo que puede llevar a soluciones lejanas a la realidad.

Tabla VII: Eslabones de la cadena de suministro de alimentos considerados en cada modelo

Taxonomía modelos de optimización

De la revisión de literatura realizada se propone una taxonomía para los modelos de optimización, dividiéndolos en los que utilizan programación lineal (PL), programación no lineal (PNL) y otras técnicas de optimización, así mismo se presentan variables y parámetros utilizados en los modelos.

Modelos con programación lineal

Las variables y los parámetros de los modelos de PL se presentan en la Tabla VIII y la Tabla IX, respectivamente. En los modelos de PNL la variable de decisión, unidad enviada a otro eslabón, se presenta con mayor frecuencia, siete de los ocho artículos la consideran. En cuatro se utiliza el tamaño de lote como variable, mientras cinco de los modelos usan variables binarias para la toma de decisiones.

Tabla VIII: Variables de los modelos de programación lineal aplicados a CSA

Tabla IX: Parámetros de los modelos de programación lineal aplicados a CSA

Respecto a los parámetros utilizados, los costos son tomados en cuenta en siete modelos, entre los que se destacan los costos de producción, de transporte y de recuperación; solo dos modelos consideran de forma explícita los costos de implementar ST; finalmente se destaca el tiempo de trasporte, la demanda y el porcentaje de degradación de la calidad como parámetros a considerar en los modelos analizados. Se resalta que en varios modelos una de las principales decisiones abordadas es el tamaño de lote que se va a manejar, esto permite establecer el nivel de granularidad óptimo cuando se adopta un sistema de trazabilidad [62], ayuda a limitar la retirada del producto y determina el costo específico de trazabilidad para una unidad trazable y, por ende, determinar de forma más específica los beneficios alcanzados por la implementación de sistemas de trazabilidad.

Modelos con programación no lineal

Las variables y los parámetros utilizados en los modelos de programación no lineal (PNL) se presentan en la Tabla X y en la Tabla XI, respectivamente. En los modelos que utilizan PNL se destaca el uso de variables binarias y variables de decisión: unidades enviadas y unidades producidas.

Tabla X: Variables de los modelos de programación no lineal aplicados a CSA

Tabla XI: Parámetros de los modelos de programación no lineal aplicados a CSA

Respecto a los parámetros, los más utilizados son los costos, la demanda y el porcentaje de degradación de la calidad. Se evidencia que tanto las variables como los parámetros más utilizados en los modelos de programación lineal y no lineal son similares. Esto refleja el interés en los modelos de programación no lineal en el flujo de materiales y la necesidad de considerar la incertidumbre de las CS a la hora de modelar, con el ánimo de garantizar un mayor acercamiento a la realidad. Por otro lado, se evidencia una muy baja atención en los flujos de información.

Modelos con otra técnica de optimización

Las variables y los parámetros utilizados en los modelos que manejan técnicas de optimización diferentes a las clásicas (programación lineal y no lineal) se presentan en la Tabla XII y en la Tabla XIII, respectivamente. En los modelos planteados con otras técnicas se destaca que, a diferencia de los analizados anteriormente, se tiene en consideración el ST a utilizar como variable de decisión.

Tabla XII: Variables de los modelos que utilizan otra técnica de optimización

Tabla XIII: Parámetros de los modelos que utilizan otra técnica de optimización

Al igual que en las técnicas anteriores, se hace evidente la relación entre los parámetros de calidad de la CS y la implementación del ST, ya que varios autores la relacionan en sus modelos [16], [47], [53] , [59] y [11], dicha relación contribuye a mejorar el desempeño de la cadena, puesto que una de las claves de la gestión de la CSA es una visión integradora de logística y calidad; lo anterior resalta la necesidad de modelos combinados que estimen los cambios de calidad y la vida útil restante para optimizar las estrategias de gestión de la cadena [61].

Modelado de trazabilidad con técnicas de simulación

El principal inconveniente de la mayoría de los modelos analíticos es la necesidad de cumplir numerosas restricciones antes de poder aplicarse en la práctica, mientras los enfoques matemáticos requieren demasiadas simplificaciones para modelar problemas en CS realistas [68]. Las herramientas de simulación a menudo se utilizan para respaldar la toma de decisiones de rediseño o gestión de la CS cuando existe incertidumbre logística [69]. En la Tabla XIV se distinguen cuatro tipos de simulación para la gestión de la CSA: (i) simulación en hoja de cálculo, (ii) dinámica de sistema (DS), (iii) simulación con eventos discretos (DEDS) y (iv) juegos de negocios [69]. La dinámica de sistema proporciona información cualitativa, mientras que la simulación con eventos discretos cuantifica los resultados e incorpora incertidumbres, y los juegos pueden educar y entrenar a los usuarios [68].

Tabla XIV: Modelos de simulación sobre la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos

La simulación con eventos discretos permite modelar sistemas logísticos de forma más operativa y detallada [68] y con la dinámica de sistemas se puede evaluar la relación entre las variables y el comportamiento dependiente del tiempo con una visión a nivel estratégico [70]. Por su parte, la simulación basada en agentes proporciona una forma de examinar la estructura de la CS y los problemas de gestión, desde una visión que combina elementos de decisión tácticos [71]. En la Tabla XIV se muestran los modelos de trazabilidad bajo el enfoque de simulación, con una descripción y el objetivo principal de cada modelo.

De acuerdo con el análisis de los cuatro paradigmas de simulación de Van der Vorst et al. [69] en 2000 y Kleijnen [78] en 2003, se evidencia que la dinámica de sistemas es el paradigma más adecuado para abordar problemas estratégicos que contemplen la calidad de los productos para la CSA. También se destaca que las simulaciones de mayor frecuencia son las desarrolladas a través de las hojas de cálculo, dada su facilidad de uso.

Las medidas de desempeño de la CSA son un aspecto esencial en el modelado, tanto de simulación como de optimización, para el análisis de los sistemas de trazabilidad. Las Tablas XV, XVI y XVII presentan las medidas de desempeño utilizadas en los modelos de simulación planteados bajo dinámica de sistemas, simulación de eventos discretos y simulación por hojas de cálculo, respectivamente.

Tabla XV: Medidas de desempeño de los modelos de dinámica de sistemas

Tabla XVI: Medidas de desempeño de los modelos de simulación de eventos discretos

Tabla XVII: Medidas de desempeño de los modelos de simulación por hojas de cálculo

Se destacan los estudios en los que son abordadas las medidas relacionadas con el análisis de la capacidad de recuperación del sistema de trazabilidad, lo cual refleja una preocupación en las investigaciones por la sostenibilidad del sistema de producción y recuperación a lo largo de las CSA. En este sentido, es posible que estas medidas conduzcan a entender mejor el concepto y la dinámica de la seguridad alimentaria en las CS.

Trabajo futuro y gaps identificados

Se evidencia que el tema de trazabilidad en la CSA ha tenido una dinámica de publicación creciente y un interés por la comunidad académica y empresarial. Varios autores relacionan la trazabilidad y la calidad, mantener una alta calidad en alimentos perecederos es de vital importancia para el desempeño de la CSA [52].

En cuanto a la implementación de TS desde la parte económica, se destaca la necesidad de desarrollar modelos que permitan la evaluación y comparación de metodologías en un marco unificado, tanto desde el punto de vista operativo como económico, considerando costos y beneficios derivados de la introducción de un TS optimizado [4], en dicha optimización se debe considerar la oportunidad de aumentar la profundidad del TS [10], para esto se sugiere la implementación de un sistema de comunicación e intercambio de información en toda la CSA que conduzca a un intercambio de datos rápido y eficiente [79]; además, algunos autores mencionan la necesidad de investigaciones adicionales sobre trazabilidad centradas en cuestiones tales como: mejorar los aspectos tecnológicos de los sistemas de trazabilidad, el vínculo entre el sistema de trazabilidad y las unidades de producción de alimentos, la estandarización del intercambio de información, la integración de la trazabilidad en la gestión logística y el desarrollo de estrategias de creación de conciencia, y la eficacia de la comunicación de la información de trazabilidad a los consumidores y otras partes interesadas [8] se considera que dichos aspectos pueden ser considerados en los modelos de optimización y en los de simulación, dependiendo del enfoque dado.

Por otro lado, en relación con los alimentos procesados, a pesar de contar con diferentes métodos para implementar la trazabilidad en el procesamiento, considerando el reto que implica la mezcla de lotes, se resalta la necesidad de evaluar los escenarios de aplicación específicos en el procesamiento de alimentos para mejorar la granularidad [80] en este mismo sentido, se requiere la formulación de políticas de mezcla desde la producción hasta la distribución y el desarrollo de modelos que permitan determinar el tamaño óptimo del lote, lo cual en conjunto ayudará a reducir la dispersión general del lote [4]. Adicionalmente, toma relevancia considerar modelos de trazabilidad para múltiples productos y las interacciones entre estos [52] así como proponer modelos con degradación de calidad para múltiples productos relacionados, por ejemplo frutas y verduras, incluyendo parámetros variables como fluctuación de la temperatura [68], [81] y humedad relativa en cambios de pisos térmicos [82].

Existe una clara tendencia por el consumo de productos frescos con alta calidad, por lo que los eslabones de la cadena deberán prestar atención a la vida útil del producto, para esto se deberán considerar, en el modelado, los beneficios potenciales que los productores o fabricantes podrían obtener al ofrecer una vida útil más larga [16], con la implementación de ST en términos de crisis de seguridad y eficiencia de producción [72]. Considerar los beneficios potenciales que los fabricantes de alimentos podrían obtener al proporcionar una vida útil más larga del producto es un tema importante y desafiante para la investigación futura, ya que bajo esta circunstancia el modelo realmente considera el problema desde la perspectiva de la cadena de suministro completa [16]. De acuerdo con esto, varios modelos buscan maximizar los beneficios de la trazabilidad, pero se deben cuantificar diferentes medidas de desempeño en la CSA, lo que da origen a modelos multiobjetivo, un trabajo de investigación futuro.

De igual forma, se requieren modelos con enfoques holísticos para el diseño y la gestión de la cadena de suministro de alimentos frescos [81], que tengan en consideración los efectos de una decisión de un proveedor en la responsabilidad y el funcionamiento con otro eslabón, a través de mecanismos de participación al implantar ST [63]. En el diseño de la capacidad de seguimiento en la CSA influyen factores como la recuperación de los desperdicios [75] y la evaluación de los valores de granularidad para mejorar el sistema de trazabilidad [83], también se sugiere trabajar en modelos que permitan optimizar los esfuerzos conjuntos de retirada de productos de la cadena de suministro y la reducción de precio, utilizando costos de retiro compartidos [84].

Las relaciones complejas entre eslabones y variables conllevan a la creación de modelos integrados, planeación estratégica, operativa y táctica para dar solución a los principales problemas de la CSA, modelos que aunque pueden ser robustos y complejos, facilitan la gestión [16]. Los documentos se enfocan especialmente en decisiones tácticas y operativas, las decisiones estratégicas son menos consideradas, por lo tanto, es un campo de investigación que requiere mayor atención [81]. Se menciona la necesidad de desarrollar un marco de optimización y planificación capaz de tener en cuenta explícitamente la variable “tiempo”, con el objetivo de seguir de cerca la evolución y los cambios en la línea de producción e ir actualizando y adaptando dinámicamente las estrategias de planificación a los cambios [4]. En este sentido, se destaca el uso de la dinámica de sistemas como técnica de simulación para dar soporte a los tomadores de decisiones, ya que desarrolla composiciones entre variables de forma sistémica para la toma de decisiones integrales y estratégicas de la CSA, que permite el análisis del comportamiento a través del tiempo [73].

Los principales problemas modelados han sido de planificación, asignación y transporte. Sin embargo, la adición constante de nuevos parámetros, condiciones y variables proponen la integración de métodos complementarios como optimización y simulación, o el cambio de perspectiva de un enfoque de monocriterio a un enfoque multicriterio, relacionado múltiples niveles o eslabones [12]. A pesar de que este cambio se ha evidenciado en las últimas publicaciones, se considera que aún quedan investigaciones por desarrollar a través de modelos multiobjetivo.

Recientemente, la evolución de la logística en el contexto de la industria 4.0 requiere delprocesamiento de grandes volúmenes de información con múltiples atributos cuantitativos y cualitativos. En este contexto, los sistemas de trazabilidad cumplen un papel esencial en la sincronización de los autores y el mejoramiento del desempeño de la CSA. Desde la revisión de literatura se ha evidenciado la carencia de estudios que vinculen el modelado de los sistemas de trazabilidad y la logística 4.0, convirtiéndose en una oportunidad para futuras investigaciones. En este mismo contexto se sugiere considerar en futuras investigaciones el uso de tecnologías novedosas, como inteligencia artificial, Big Data y Blockchain para obtener mejoras efectivas en el desempeño de la trazabilidad en el procesamiento de alimentos [80], además, la creciente difusión de nuevas tecnologías para la identificación y la detección automáticas, junto con la disponibilidad de nuevos modelos computacionales y de simulación y de nuevos sistemas mecánicos para la segregación de lotes abren el camino para nuevas soluciones capaces de garantizar un mayor nivel de control de la cadena de suministro [4].

Tal vez uno de los focos de estudios relevantes es la necesidad de incluir la sostenibilidad en la gestión de la CSA, considerando impactos ambientales y ecológicos, como el consumo y el agotamiento de los recursos hídricos o la pérdida de energía, junto con las relaciones con trazabilidad [76]. Considerar la sostenibilidad en la gestión de la CS requiere incluir no solo aspectos ecológicos y económicos sino también sociales, uno de ellos: la seguridad alimentaria, donde la trazabilidad resulta fundamental. En conclusión, para futuras investigaciones también se sugieren modelos de gestión logística sostenible.

La mayoría de los modelos revisados utilizan parámetros determinísticos, sin embargo, se hace necesario el desarrollo de modelos de optimización que aborden la incertidumbre y la variabilidad del flujo de material en la CSA, con un enfoque estocástico para evitar sesgos con la realidad [53].

Se debe diseñar e implementar sistemas de trazabilidad que permitan el acceso eficiente a la información y que contemplen las fuertes asimetrías entre los eslabones, ya que estos generan escenarios con alto grado de incertidumbre, lo cual produce la necesidad de modelos que contemplen la información difusa en los ST [53]. Para investigaciones futuras que aborden la incertidumbre en los parámetros establecidos, como la demanda o el porcentaje de integridad, una opción es utilizar modelos de programación estocástico [65]. Bajo este mismo enfoque y en relación con la representación de la CSA como una red, se puede considerar la opción de incluir en el modelo la incertidumbre de la oferta [12] y la variabilidad de la demanda, junto con la volatilidad del precio y la confiabilidad de la entrega [60]. Se requiere el uso de tecnologías de trazabilidad de alimentos más efectivas y económicas que faciliten la integración de datos de trazabilidad estáticos y dinámicos y que garanticen la continuidad del flujo de información dentro de la cadena de suministro [8].

En síntesis, se observa la necesidad de desarrollar modelos que aborden la variabilidad y la incertidumbre de los sistemas a través de los parámetros estocásticos; modelos que apoyen la toma de decisiones estratégicas, donde se resalta la importancia de la dinámica de sistemas; desarrollo e implementación de tecnología con un enfoque sistémico que permita mejorar las características de rastreo y seguimiento; desarrollo de modelos que integren métodos complementarios o utilización de enfoques multiobjetivo, multiproducto; modelos y mecanismos para la gestión de datos orientados al análisis integral de las relaciones y los flujos entre los actores de la cadena; desarrollo de modelos que permitan el análisis del comportamiento de la implementación tecnológica en los procesos de trazabilidad; desarrollo de modelos de participación que consideren los efectos de las decisiones de un eslabón en la responsabilidad y el funcionamiento del otro, y desarrollo de modelos de gestión logística sostenible. En este sentido, una intervención sistémica basada en modelos de simulación estratégicos puede mejorar el proceso de toma de decisiones en el largo plazo de los sistemas de trazabilidad adoptados.

Referencias

[1] K. M. Karlsen, and P. Olsen, “Validity of method for analysing critical traceability points”, Food Control, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 1209-1215, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.01.020 [Link]

[2] M. N. Faisal, and F. Talib, “ Implementing traceability in Indian food-supply chains: An interpretive structural modeling approach”, J. Foodserv. Bus. Res., vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 171-196, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1080/15378020.2016.1159894 [Link]

[3] M. Thakur, and C. R. Hurburgh, “Framework for implementing traceability system in the bulk grain supply chain”, J. Food Eng., vol. 95, no. 4, pp. 617-626, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2009.06. 028 [Link]

[4] F. Dabbene, P. Gay, and C. Tortia, “Traceability issues in food supply chain management: A review”, Biosyst. Eng., vol. 120, pp. 65-80, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2013.09.006 [Link]

[5] J. A. Alfaro, and L. A. Rábade, “Traceability as a strategic tool to improve inventory management: A case study in the food industry”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 118, no. 1, pp. 104-110, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2008.08.030 [Link]

[6] P. Olsen, and M. Borit, “How to define traceability”, Trends Food Sci. Technol., vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 142-150, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2012.10.003 [Link]

[7] T. A. McMeekin et al., “Information systems in food safety management”, Int. J. Food Microbiol., vol. 112, no. 3, pp. 181-194, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2006.04.048 [Link]

[8] T. Bosona, and G. Gebresenbet, “Food traceability as an integral part of logistics management in food and agricultural supply chain”, Food Control, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 32-48, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2013.02.004 [Link]

[9] X. Wang, D. Li, and C. O’Brien, “Optimisation of traceability and operations planning: An integrated model for perishable food production”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 2865-2886, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207540701725075 [Link]

[10] R. Saltini, and R. Akkerman, “Testing improvements in the chocolate traceability system: Impact on product recalls and production efficiency”, Food Control, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 221-226, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2011.07.015 [Link]

[11] R. Gautam, A. Singh, K. Karthik, S. Pandey, F. Scrimgeour, and M. K. Tiwari, “Traceability¸ using RFID and its formulation for a kiwifruit supply chain”, Comput. Ind. Eng., vol. 103, pp. 46-58, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cie.2016.09.007 [Link]

[12] W. E. Soto-Silva, M. C. González-Araya, M. A. Oliva-Fernández, and L. M. Plà-Aragonés, “Optimizing fresh food logistics for processing: Application for a large Chilean apple supply chain”, Comput. Electron. Agric., vol. 136, pp. 42-57, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2017.02.020 [Link]

[13] J. A. Orjuela Castro, “Incidencia del diseño de la cadena de suministro alimentaria en el equilibrio de flujos logísticos”, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, 2018.

[14] B. Kitchenham, “Procedures for Performing Systematic Reviews”, Technical Report TR/SE- 0401, Department of Computer Science, Keele University, UK, 2004.

[15] D. L. Rincón, J. E. Fonseca y J. A. Orjuela-Castro, “Hacia un marco conceptual común para la trazabilidad en la cadena de suministro de alimentos”, Ingeniería, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 161-189, 2017. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2017.2.a01 [Link]

[16] X. Wang, D. Li, C. O’Brien, and Y. Li, “A production planning model to reduce risk and improve operations management”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 124, no. 2, pp. 463-474, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2009.12.009 [Link]

[17] J. E. Hobbs, “Transaction costs and slaughter cattle procurement: Processors’ selection of supply channels”, Agribusiness, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 509-523, 1996. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1520-6297(199611/12)12:6<509::AID-AGR2>3.0.CO;2-7 [Link]

[18] Food Chain Strategy and Food Standards Agency, “Traceability in the Food Chain. A preliminary study”, Food Standard Agency, 2002.

[19] E. Golan et al., “Traceability in the US food supply: Economic theory and industry studies”, Agricultural Economic Report No. 830, 2004.

[20] K. M. Karlsen, B. Dreyer, P. Olsen, and E. O. Elvevoll, “Granularity and its role in implementation of seafood traceability”, J. Food Eng., vol. 112, no. 1-2, pp. 78-85, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2012.03.025 [Link]

[21] Icontec, “NTC-ISO 9000 Sistemas de Gestión de la Calidad - fundamentos y vocabulario”, Icontec, 2015.

[22] M. Bertolini, M. Bevilacqua, and R. Massini, “FMECA approach to product traceability in the food industry”, Food Control, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 137-145, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2004.09.013 [Link]

[23] P. Olsen, and M. Aschan, “Reference method for analyzing material flow, information flow and information loss in food supply chains”, Trends Food Sci. Technol., vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 313-320, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2010.03.002 [Link]

[24] T. Kelepouris, K. Pramatari, and G. Doukidis, “RFID-enabled traceability in the food supply chain”, Ind. Manag. Data Syst., vol. 107, no. 2, pp. 183-200, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1108/02635570710723804 [Link]

[25] S. Tamayo, T. Monteiro, and N. Sauer, “Deliveries optimization by exploiting production traceability information”, Eng. Appl. Artif. Intell., vol. 22, no. 4-5, pp. 557-568, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engappai.2009.02.007 [Link]

[26] A. Regattieri, M. Gamberi, and R. Manzini, “Traceability of food products: General framework and experimental evidence”, J. Food Eng., vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 347-356, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.10.032 [Link]

[27] B. Manos, and I. Manikas, “Article information: Traceability in the greek fresh produce sector: drivers and constraints”, Br. Food J., vol. 112, no. 6, pp. 640-652, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701011052727 [Link]

[28] A. Bechini, M. Cimino, F. Marcelloni, and A. Tomasi, “Patterns and technologies for enabling supply chain traceability through collaborative e-business”, Inf. Softw. Technol., vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 342-359, 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infsof.2007.02.017 [Link]

[29] EC, “Commission Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 of 29 April 2004 on the hygiene of foodstuffs”, European Parliament and of the Council, 2004.

[30] J. van der Vorst, A. Beulens, and P. van Beek, “Innovations in logistics and ICT in food supply chain networks”, Innovations in Agri-Food Systems: Product Quality and Consumer Acceptance, Wageningen Academic Publishers, pp. 245-291, 2005.

[31] L. A. Rábade, and J. A. Alfaro, “Buyer-supplier relationship’s influence on traceability implementation in the vegetable industry”, J. Purch. Supply Manag., vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 39-50, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pursup.2006.02.003 [Link]

[32] D. Folinas, I. Manikas, and B. Manos, “Traceability data management for food chains”, Br. Food J., vol. 108, no. 8, pp. 622-633, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070700610682319 [Link]

[33] M. Canavari, R. Centonze, M. Hingley, and R. Spadoni, “Traceability as part of competitive strategy in the fruit supply chain”, Br. Food J., vol. 112, no. 2, pp. 171-186, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701011018851 [Link]

[34] W. van Rijswijk, L. J. Frewer, D. Menozzi, and G. Faioli, “Consumer perceptions of traceability: A cross-national comparison of the associated benefits”, Food Qual. Prefer., vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 452-464, 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2008.02.001 [Link]

[35] S. Khan, A. Haleem, M. I. Khan, M. H. Abidi, and A. Al-Ahmari, “Implementing traceability systems in specific supply chain management (SCM) through critical success factors (CSFs)”, Sustain., vol. 10, no. 1, 2018. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010204 [Link]

[36] F. Dabbene, and P. Gay, “Food traceability systems: Performance evaluation and optimization”, Comput. Electron. Agric., vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 139-146, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2010.10.009 [Link]

[37] J. van der Vorst, “Performance levels in food traceability and the impact on chain design: Results of an international benchmark study”, Dynamics in Chains and Networks, Wageningen Academic Press, 2004.

[38] M. Salampasis, D. Tektonidis, and E. P. Kalogianni, “TraceALL: A semantic web framework for food traceability systems”, J. Syst. Inf. Technol., vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 302-317, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1108/13287261211279053 [Link]

[39] J. Hu, X. Zhang, L. M. Moga, and M. Neculita, “Modeling and implementation of the vegetable supply chain traceability system”, Food Control, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 341-353, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.06.037 [Link]

[40] J. T. Mgonja, P. Luning, and J. van Der Vorst, “Diagnostic model for assessing traceability system performance in fish processing plants”, J. Food Eng., vol. 118, no. 2, pp. 188-197, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2013.04.009 [Link]

[41] T. Pizzuti, and G. Mirabelli, “The Global Track&Trace System for food: General framework and functioning principles”, J. Food Eng., vol. 159, pp. 16-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2015.03.001 [Link]

[42] W. Liang, J. Cao, Y. Fan, K. Zhu, and Q. Dai, “Modeling and implementation of cattle/beef supply chain traceability using a distributed RFID-based framework in China”, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 10, pp. 1-17, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139558 [Link]

[43] R. Y. Chen, “Autonomous tracing system for backward design in food supply chain”, Food Control, vol. 51, pp. 70-84, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2014.11.004 [Link]

[44] C. N. Verdouw, J. Wolfert, A. J. M. Beulens, and A. Rialland, “Virtualization of food supply chains with the internet of things”, J. Food Eng., vol. 176, pp. 128-136, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2015.11.009 [Link]

[45] H. M. Kim, and M. Laskowski, “Towards an ontology-driven blockchain design for supply chain provenance”, Intell. Syst. Accounting, Financ. Manag., vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 18-27, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1002/isaf.1424 [Link]

[46] T. M. Fernández-Caramés, and P. Fraga-Lamas, “A Review on the Use of Blockchain for the Internet of Things”, IEEE Access, vol. 6, pp. 32979-33001. https://doi.org/10.1109/access.2018.2842685 [Link]

[47] F. Dabbene, P. Gay, and N. Sacco, “Optimisation of fresh-food supply chains in uncertain environments, Part I: Background and methodology”, Biosyst. Eng., vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 348-359, 2008. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2007.11.011 [Link]

[48] X. Zhang, J. Zhang, F. Liu, Z. Fu, and W. Mu, “Strengths and limitations on the operating mechanisms of traceability system in agro food, China”, Food Control, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 825-829, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2009.10.015 [Link]

[49] A. Chaudhuri, S. Srivastava, R. K. Srivastava, and Z. Parveen, “Risk propagation and its impact on performance in food processing supply chain: A fuzzy interpretive structural modeling based approach”, J. Model. Manag., vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 660-693, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1108/JM2-08-2014-0065 [Link]

[50] M. Balaji, and K. Arshinder, “Modeling the causes of food wastage in Indian perishable food supply chain”, Resour. Conserv. Recycl., vol. 114, pp. 153-167, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2016.07.016 [Link]

[51] R. Shankar, R. Gupta, and D. K. Pathak, “Modeling critical success factors of traceability for food logistics system”, Transp. Res. Part E Logist. Transp. Rev., vol. 119, pp. 205-222, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tre.2018.03.006 [Link]

[52] A. Rong, R. Akkerman, and M. Grunow, “An optimization approach for managing fresh food quality throughout the supply chain”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 131, no. 1, pp. 421-429, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2009.11.026 [Link]

[53] J. Yu, M. Gan, S. Ni, and D. Chen, “Multi-objective models and real case study for dual- channel FAP supply chain network design with fuzzy information”, J. Intell. Manuf., vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 389-403, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10845-015-1115-8 [Link]

[54] C. Dupuy, V. Botta-Genoulaz, and A. Guinet, “Batch dispersion model to optimise traceability in food industry”, J. Food Eng., vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 333-339, 2005. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2004.05.074 [Link]

[55] D. Li, D. Kehoe, and P. Drake, “Dynamic planning with a wireless product identification technology in food supply chains”, Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., vol. 30, no. 9-10, pp. 938-944, 2006. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-005-0066-1 [Link]

[56] M. Thakur, L. Wang, and C. R. Hurburgh, “A multi-objective optimization approach to balancing cost and traceability in bulk grain handling”, J. Food Eng., vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 193-200, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2010.07. [Link]

[57] O. Ahumada, and J. R.Villalobos, “Operational model for planning the harvest and distribution of perishable agricultural products”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 133, no. 2, pp. 677-687, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.05.015 [Link]

[58] X. Wang, and D. Li, “A dynamic product quality evaluation based pricing model for perishable food supply chains”, Omega, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 906-917, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.omega.2012.02.001 [Link]

[59] S. Piramuthu, P. Farahani, and M. Grunow, “RFID-generated traceability for contaminated product recall in perishable food supply networks”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 225, no. 2, pp. 253-262, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.09.024 [Link]

[60] M. Yu, and A. Nagurney, “Competitive food supply chain networks with application to fresh produce”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 224, no. 2, pp. 273-282, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.07.033 [Link]

[61] M. Hertog, I. Uysal, U. McCarthy, B. M. Verlinden, and B. M. Nicolaï, “Shelf life modelling for first-expiredfirst- out warehouse management”, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., vol. 372, no. 2017. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2013.0306 [Link]

[62] G. Aiello, M. Enea, and C. Muriana, “The expected value of the traceability information”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 244, no. 1, pp. 176-186, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2015.01.028 [Link]

[63] H. Dai, M. M. Tseng, and P. H. Zipkin, “Design of traceability systems for product recall”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 511-531, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2014.955922 [Link]

[64] D. Li, and X. Wang, “Dynamic supply chain decisions based on networked sensor data: an application in the chilled food retail chain”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 55, no. 17, pp. 5127-5141, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2015.1047976 [Link]

[65] A. Mohammed, Q. Wang, and X. Li, “A study in integrity of an RFID-monitoring HMSC” Int. J. Food Prop., vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 1145-1158, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/10942912.2016.1203933 [Link]

[66] J. Dai, L. Fan, N. Lee, and J. Li, “Joint optimisation of tracking capability and price in a supply chain with endogenous pricing”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 55, no. 18, pp. 5465-5484, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2017.1321800 [Link]

[67] D. M. Sourza Monteiro, “Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of the Economics of Traceability Adoption in Food Supply Chains”, Doctoral Dissertations Available from Proquest, 2007.

[68] J. van der Vorst, S.-O. Tromp, and D.-J. van der Zee, “Simulation modelling for food supply chain redesign; integrated decision making on product quality, sustainability and logistics”, Int. J. Prod. Res., vol. 47, no. 23, pp. 6611-6631, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207540802356747 [Link]

[69] J. van der Vorst, A. J. M. Beulens, and P. van Beek, “Modelling and simulating multi-echelon food systems”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 122, pp. 354-366, 2000. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0377-2217(99)00238-6 [Link]

[70] J. Sterman, Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World, McGraw Hill. 2000.

[71] L. A. Santa-Eulalia, G. Halladjian, S. D’Amours, and J.-M. Frayret, “Integrated methodological frameworks for modeling agent-based advanced supply chain planning systems: A systematic literature review”, J. Ind. Eng. Manag., vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 624-668, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.3926/jiem.326 [Link]

[72] R. Saltini, R. Akkerman, and S. Frosch, “Optimizing chocolate production through traceability: A review of the influence of farming practices on cocoa bean quality”, Food Control, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 167-187, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.05.054 [Link]

[73] M. M. Herrera y J. A. Orjuela, “Perspectiva de trazabilidad en la cadena de suministros de frutas: un enfoque desde la dinámica de sistemas”, Ingeniería, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 236-247, 2014.

[74] H. Ge, R. Gray, and J. Nolan, “Agricultural supply chain optimization and complexity: A comparison of analytic vs simulated solutions and policie”, Int. J. Prod. Econ., vol. 159, pp. 208-220, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.09.023 [Link]

[75] M. M. Herrera, L. Vargas, and D. Contento, “Modeling the traceability and recovery processes in the closedloop supply chain and their effects”, J. Figueroa-García, E. López-Santana, J. Rodriguez-Molano (eds), Applied Computer Sciences in Engineering, CCIS, vol. 915, pp. 328-339, Springer, 2018.

[76] G. La Scalia, R. Micale, P. P. Miglietta, and P. Toma, “Reducing waste and ecological impacts through a sustainable and efficient management of perishable food based on the Monte Carlo simulation”, Ecol. Indic., vol. 97, pp. 363-371, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.10.041 [Link]

[77] I. Gunawan, I. Vanany, and E. Widodo, “Cost-benefit model in improving traceability system: Case study in Indonesian bulk-liquid industry”, Supply Chain Forum, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 145-157, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1080/16258312.2019.1570671 [Link]

[78] J. Kleijnen, and M. Smits, “Performance metrics in supply chain management”, J. Oper. Res. Soc., vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 507-514, 2003. https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jors.2601539 [Link]

[79] I. Anica-Popa, “Food traceability systems and information sharing in food supply chain ionu¸t Anica-Popa”, Manag. Mark. Challenges Knowl. Soc., vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 749-758, 2012.

[80] J. Qian, B. Dai, B. Wang, Y. Zha, and Q. Song, “Traceability in food processing: Problems, methods, and performance evaluations - a review”, Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr., vol. 0, no. 0, pp. 1-14, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2020.1825925 [Link]

[81] W. E. Soto-Silva, E. Nadal-Roig, M. C. González-Araya, and L. M. Pla-Aragones, “Operational research models applied to the fresh fruit supply chain”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 251, no. 2, pp. 345- 355, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2015.08.046 [Link]

[82] L. A. Sanabria, A. M. Peralta, and J. A. Orjuela, “Modelos de localización para cadenas agroalimentarias perecederas: una revisión al estado del arte”, Ingeniería, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 23-45, 2017. https://doi.org/10.14483/udistrital.jour.reving.2017.1.a04 [Link]

[83] J. Qian, B. Fan, X. Wu, S. Han, S. Liu, and X. Yang, “Comprehensive and quantifiable granularity: A novel model to measure agro-food traceability”, Food Control, vol. 74, pp. 98-106, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2016.11.034 [Link]

[84] B. Dai, Y. Nu, X. Xie, and J. Li, “Interactions of traceability and reliability optimization in a competitive supply chain with product recall”, Eur. J. Oper. Res., vol. 290, no. 1, pp. 116-131, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2020.08.003 [Link]

Maya, T, Orjuela, J. A., Herrera, M. M.: Retos en el modelado de la trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos. INGENIERÍA, Vol. 26, Num. 2, pp. 143-172 (2021). © The authors; reproduction right holder Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas

Most read articles by the same author(s)