Published:

2021-09-30

Issue:

Vol. 23 No. 2 (2021): July-December

Section:

Editorial

Editorial

The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education

Editorial

Authors

Keywords:

Editorial (en).

Keywords:

Editorial (es).

Author Biographies

Ximena Bonilla Medina, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas

S. Ximena Bonilla Medina is a Doctor of education from the University of East London. She also holds a M.A in applied linguistics for TEFL from Francisco Jose de Caldas Distrital University and a BA in Spanish-English from Pedagógica University. She is currently the director of the Language Institute at Distrital University, a professor and researcher of the same university.  She is a member of the research group ESTUPOLI and director of the “semillero”: second language teaching and learning, culture and social justice. Her research interests are: race, interculturality, teacher education and technology within a humanistic approach in language teaching.

Álvaro Hernán Quintero Polo, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas

Licenciado en Idiomas Inglés y español por la Universidad de Nariño, Magíster en Lingüística Aplicada a la Enseñanza del Inglés por la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Doctor en Educación por la Universidad Santo Tomás. Profesor de la Facultad de Ciencias y Educación de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas. Miembro del grupo de investigación: Estudios Críticos de Políticas Educativas Colombianas. Ha sido profesor en programas TEFL de pregrado y posgrado de diferentes universidades colombianas. Es codirector del grupo de investigación Estudios Críticos de Políticas Educativas Colombianas. Sus intereses de investigación son: el análisis del discurso, la pedagogía del lenguaje y la evaluación curricular

References

Davies, A. & Elder. C. (2004). The Handbook of Applied Linguistics. Blackwell Publishing.

Grabe, W. & Kaplan, R. (1992). Introduction to Applied Linguistics. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.

Pennycook, A. (2001). Critical Applied Linguistics: A (Critical) Introduction.Lawrence Erlbaum.

How to Cite

APA

Bonilla Medina, X., & Quintero Polo, Álvaro H. (2021). Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 23(2), 117–121. Retrieved from https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834

ACM

[1]
Bonilla Medina, X. and Quintero Polo, Álvaro H. 2021. Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal. 23, 2 (Sep. 2021), 117–121.

ACS

(1)
Bonilla Medina, X.; Quintero Polo, Álvaro H. Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education. Colomb. appl. linguist. j 2021, 23, 117-121.

ABNT

BONILLA MEDINA, X.; QUINTERO POLO, Álvaro H. Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, [S. l.], v. 23, n. 2, p. 117–121, 2021. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834. Acesso em: 1 oct. 2022.

Chicago

Bonilla Medina, Ximena, and Álvaro Hernán Quintero Polo. 2021. “Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 23 (2):117-21. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834.

Harvard

Bonilla Medina, X. and Quintero Polo, Álvaro H. (2021) “Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education”, Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 23(2), pp. 117–121. Available at: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834 (Accessed: 1October2022).

IEEE

[1]
X. Bonilla Medina and Álvaro H. Quintero Polo, “Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education”, Colomb. appl. linguist. j, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 117–121, Sep. 2021.

MLA

Bonilla Medina, X., and Álvaro H. Quintero Polo. “Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, vol. 23, no. 2, Sept. 2021, pp. 117-21, https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834.

Turabian

Bonilla Medina, Ximena, and Álvaro Hernán Quintero Polo. “Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 23, no. 2 (September 30, 2021): 117–121. Accessed October 1, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834.

Vancouver

1.
Bonilla Medina X, Quintero Polo Álvaro H. Editorial : The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education. Colomb. appl. linguist. j [Internet]. 2021Sep.30 [cited 2022Oct.1];23(2):117-21. Available from: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18834

Download Citation

Visitas

21

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

The Thirtieth Anniversary of Our MA In Applied Linguistics To ELT: A Commitment to the Critical Dimension of Language Education

This issue of the Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, CALJ, coincides with the commemoration of the thirtieth anniversary of the MA in Applied Linguistics to ELT of Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas. Every actor of the MA embraces an evolving critical approach to researching the humanistic, social, cultural, and political dimensions of language education. To be consistent with an intended critical perspective in the face of language issues that relate to the practices of social agents within and outside educational settings, every actor of the MA does not want to be only a mere spectator of what is happening in Colombia and around the world. The Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal is itself an illustration of the activities originated in the MA program that account for such evolution.

The commemoration of the thirtieth anniversary of our MA program leads us to think of what the main concern of the graduate program has been and how the CALJ has found its place about such concern along the years. At an initial stage, the MA program associated applied linguistics with the disciplinary knowledge that language teachers were expected to have of linguistic studies applied to language teaching. There was an emphasis on language as an object of study. This emphasis related to the knowledge that has been scientifically produced by linguists about the nature of human language, how it was learned, and what role it played in the life of people and communities. Even though applied linguistics and language teaching appeared associated, little attention was paid to the fact they were not one and the same activity. The application of linguistic knowledge (i.e. theory consumption or use) to the practical tasks of language teaching was more like an activity rather a theoretical study (i.e. theory production). This was influenced by the Anglo North American schools that set paradigms on how to teach best (Grabe & Kaplan, 1992).

Knowledge is not static, and linguistic knowledge is no different. In spite of the fact that there are aspects of language that have been studied for hundreds of years, a concern that emerged at a later stage of our MA was that applied linguistics dealt with aspects of the language teaching activity that were liable to become a research field. A field of theory building that justified a need for research that increased, not in number, but in quality of the nature of language and language teaching. The professors and students of our MA started to tackle such concern with a reflective attitude and from a critical perspective to look at the direction applied linguistics was appearing to move in language teaching: language as a complex individual and social phenomenon.

Similarly, the professors and students’ reflective attitude and critical perspective served the purpose of elucidating the dichotomy that Davies & Elder (2004) posed “Linguistics applied” or “applied linguistics”. It was a dichotomy about the focus of linguistics as a discipline that can be applied to “solve” linguistic problems, i.e., linguistics applied, and a focus on the role of linguistics in association to other disciplines and language as mediators. i.e. applied linguistics, in the understanding and agency about social, cultural, political phenomena that surrounds language. Such elucidation, in a recent stage of our program, has led the MA to focus on some forms of the critical in applied linguistics (Pennycook, 2001) as a projection towards postmodern and poststructuralist scenarios with the intention to challenge instrumental views of language as static and as product, and more for the social relevance and emancipatory dimensions of language education research as a problematizing practice to search for alternatives that redefine the goals, politics, theoretical basis, and focus of analysis.

The Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal has played a key role in the evolution referred to above across the stages of the MA. It has gathered authors that have created a voice to reflect, discuss, question, and share their studies about issues of ELT both locally and globally. It was after the initial stage of the MA that the Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal started as an editorial initiative to publicize the pedagogical and research experiences of mainly the MA actors. In a subsequent stage, the journal expanded its scope to other programs related to Applied Linguistics and ELT in other Colombian universities and later to other foreign universities. More recently, the CALJ, at the same time it fulfilled parameters of the policies of national and international indexation and classification organizations, it became an important reference in a conversation among researchers with a common interest in views of language and language education other than the instrumental one.

With the ideas above in mind, this CALJ issue offers its readership an attention-catching array of manuscripts that starts with a text by Mónica Chamorro Mejía titled Spanish as L2 in Namtrik-speaking Bilingual Learners in Child Age: Study of Linguistic Attitudes. The author reports on a study on the linguistic attitudes of a group of Misak children who speak Namtrik as their L1 and Spanish as an L2. Those linguistic attitudes are about the spoken Spanish in Colombia, including the Namtrik-marked spoken Spanish variety within the Guambia Reservation in the southwest of Colombia.

Another article is titled On the Teachability of Figurative Language: Teachers’ Perceptions of the Role of Metaphor in English Language Teaching in Chile and its authors are Leonardo Veliz and Scott Smith. The authors’ main concern in this text is the the teachability of metaphorical language in Chilean EFL classrooms. They set out to study six English language teachers’ perceptions on the said concern by means of interviews. More specifically, the study contemplated three issues, one about the views and definitions of metaphor; other about the teachability of metaphorically used language; and another one preparedness to teach metaphor.

The title of the following manuscript is Commodity, Immunity, and Struggle: (Re)visiting Senses of Community in ELT. In it, Julia Zoraida Posada Ortiz and Harold Castañeda Peña, show how autobiographies of four English language pre-service teachers account for a “constellation of communities of fear”, among which are the teacher education program and the teaching practicum. The notion of community that is mainly discussed in the article and that has implications for ELT is “community as commodity, as immunity, and as struggle”.

The next article is Teacher and Portfolio in the Consolidation of an Assessment-as-learning Culture and its author is Edgar Picón-Jácome. In this text, there is a case-study report on the implementation of an assessment alternative called assessment portfolio. The author shows a discussion of aspects such as the mediation of ICT in solving practicality issues on the part of the participating teachers when providing feedback on both the process and the product.

The manuscript that comes next and whose title is Pair Research Tasks: Promoting Educational Research with Pre-Service Teachers was written by Eulices Córdoba Zúñiga, Isabel Cristina Zuleta Vásquez, and Uriel Moreno Moreno. The authors show as their main interest in their writing the development of theoretical-practical pair-work research tasks of preservice English language teachers. A group of twenty preservice teachers took part in an exploratory study. Those participants are reported as having learned different things that led them to draft a research proposal.

In the subsequent article titled Critical Pedagogy Trends in English Language Teaching, its authors, Brenda Portilla Quintero and Jennifer Herrera Molina, discuss the inclusion of Critical Pedagogy in ELT based on a literature review. The literature review is reported to be done through specialized data bases of both Colombian and foreign publications. As part of the findings, the authors maintain that Critical Pedagogy in ELT is an emerging trend in those countries with permanent inequality.

The article that follows is titled Bombast Bombardment and Dense Syntax versus Effective Communication and Language Teaching in ESL Settings: Nigerian English Examples authored by Omowumi Olabode Steven Ekundayo. This manuscript reports on the sociolinguistic, historical, and idiosyncratic factors that influence some educated Nigerian English speakers’ linguistic habit of using use high-sounding expressions and complex syntactic structures. The article also explains the implications of such habit for teaching and learning English in English as a second language (ESL) settings.

The last manuscript of this CALJ issue is titled Decolonizing English Language Teaching in Colombia: Epistemological Perspectives and Discursive Alternatives by Yamith Jose Fandiño-Parra. In this text, there is a call that the author makes to decolonize ELT in Colombia. That call is motivated by a review of studies on colonialism and decoloniality. The article also shows a discussion of the tension between the global north and the global south as related to ELT and a proposal for resisting epistemic and cultural dominance through alternative local discourses.

To conclude, both the CALJ and the MA in Applied Linguistics to ELT are committed to the creation of opportunities for English language teachers and researchers to grow as both actors and authors of their own pedagogical and research experiences. The creation of those opportunities will continue to be informed by a sensibility and a sensitivity towards social, cultural, and political issues of ELT. This is what, in the end, is what the critical dimension of language education is all about.

El trigésimo aniversario de nuestra maestría en lingüística aplicada a ELT: un compromiso con la dimensión crítica de la enseñanza de idiomas

Esta edición del Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal (CALJ) coincide con la conmemoración del trigésimo aniversario de la Maestría en Lingüística Aplicada a ELT de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas. El actor de la maestría adopta un enfoque crítico en evolución para investigar las dimensiones humanísticas, sociales, culturales y políticas de la educación de lenguas. Para ser consistentes con una perspectiva crítica intencionada frente a los problemas del lenguaje que se relacionan con las prácticas de los agentes sociales dentro y fuera de los escenarios educativos, el actor de la maestría no quiere ser solo un mero espectador de lo que está sucediendo en Colombia y en el mundo. La revista CALJ es en sí misma una representación de las actividades que se originan en el programa de maestría que dan cuenta de dicha evolución.

La conmemoración del trigésimo aniversario de nuestro programa de maestría nos lleva a pensar en cuál ha sido la principal preocupación del programa de posgrado y cómo el CALJ ha encontrado su lugar ante tal preocupación a lo largo de los años. En una etapa inicial, el programa de maestría asociaba la lingüística aplicada con el conocimiento disciplinario que se esperaba que los profesores de idiomas tuvieran sobre los estudios lingüísticos aplicados a la enseñanza de idiomas. Se hacía hincapié en el lenguaje como objeto de estudio. Este énfasis se relacionaba con el conocimiento que los lingüistas habían producido científicamente sobre la naturaleza del lenguaje humano, cómo se aprendía y qué papel desempeñaba en la vida de las personas y las comunidades. Aunque la lingüística aplicada y la enseñanza de idiomas parecían estar asociadas, se prestaba poca atención al hecho de que no eran una y la misma actividad. La aplicación del conocimiento lingüístico (es decir, el consumo o uso de la teoría) a las tareas prácticas de la enseñanza de idiomas se parecía más a una actividad que a un estudio teórico (es decir, la producción de teorías). Esto fue influenciado por las escuelas anglo-norteamericanas que establecieron paradigmas sobre cómo enseñar mejor (Grabe y Kaplan, 1992).

El conocimiento no es estático y el conocimiento lingüístico no es diferente. A pesar de que hay aspectos del lenguaje que se han estudiado durante cientos de años, una preocupación que surgió en una etapa posterior de nuestra maestría fue que la lingüística aplicada trataba aspectos de la actividad de enseñanza de idiomas que podían convertirse en un campo de investigación. Un campo de construcción teórica que justificó la necesidad de investigación que aumentó, no en número, sino en la calidad de la naturaleza de la lengua y su enseñanza. Los docentes y estudiantes de nuestra maestría comenzaron a abordar esta inquietud con una actitud reflexiva y desde una perspectiva crítica para mirar la dirección que la lingüística aplicada iba teniendo en la enseñanza de lenguas: la lengua como un fenómeno individual y social complejo.

Asimismo, la actitud reflexiva y la perspectiva crítica de docentes y estudiantes sirvieron para dilucidar la dicotomía que Davies y Elder (2004) plantean: «teoría lingüística aplicada» o “aplicación interdisciplinaria de la lingüística”. Fue una dicotomía sobre el enfoque de la lingüística como una disciplina que se puede aplicar para «resolver» problemas lingüísticos, es decir, la lingüística aplicada; y un enfoque en el papel de la lingüística en asociación con otras disciplinas y el lenguaje como mediador, tal como en la comprensión y la agencia sobre los fenómenos sociales, culturales y políticos que rodean al lenguaje. Esta elucidación, en una etapa reciente de nuestro programa, ha llevado a la maestría a enfocarse en algunas formas de lo crítico en la aplicación de la lingüística (Pennycook, 2001) como una proyección hacia escenarios posmodernos y postestructuralistas con la intención de desafiar las visiones instrumentales del lenguaje como estático y como producto, y más por la relevancia social y las dimensiones emancipadoras de la investigación de la enseñanza de idiomas como práctica problematizadora para buscar alternativas que redefinan los objetivos, la política, la base teórica y el enfoque de análisis.

CALJ ha tenido un papel clave en la evolución antes mencionada a lo largo de las etapas de la maestría. Ha reunido a autores que han creado una voz para reflexionar, discutir, cuestionar y compartir sus estudios sobre temas de ELT tanto a nivel local como global. Fue luego de la etapa inicial de la maestría que el CALJ comenzó como una iniciativa editorial para dar a conocer las experiencias pedagógicas y de investigación de los actores de la maestría principalmente. En una etapa posterior, la revista amplió su alcance a otros programas relacionados con lingüística aplicada y ELT en otras universidades colombianas y a otras universidades extranjeras. Más recientemente, el CALJ, al mismo tiempo que cumplía con parámetros de las políticas de los organismos de indexación y clasificación nacionales e internacionales, se ha convertido en referente importante en la conversación entre aquellos investigadores que comparten un interés común en una visión del lenguaje y la educación en idiomas que va más allá de lo instrumental.

Con lo anterior en mente, este número del CALJ ofrece a sus lectores una serie de manuscritos que llaman la atención, que comienza con un texto de Mónica Chamorro Mejía titulado Spanish as L2 in Namtrik-Speak Bilingual Learners in Child Age: Study of Linguistic Attitudes. En el que informa sobre un estudio de las actitudes lingüísticas de un grupo de niños Misak que hablan Namtrik como su primera lengua y español como su segunda lengua. Esas actitudes lingüísticas se refieren al español hablado en Colombia, incluida la variedad de español hablado marcado por Namtrik dentro de la Reserva de Guambia en el suroeste de Colombia.

Otro artículo se titula On the Teachability of Figurative Language: Teachers’ Perceptions of the Role of Metaphor in English Language Teaching in Chile y sus autores son Leonardo Veliz y Scott Smith. La principal preocupación de los autores en este texto es la capacidad de enseñanza del lenguaje metafórico en las aulas de inglés como lengua extranjera en Chile. Se propusieron estudiar las percepciones de seis profesores de inglés sobre dicha preocupación mediante entrevistas. Más específicamente, el estudio contempló tres cuestiones, una sobre los puntos de vista y definiciones de la metáfora; otra sobre la capacidad de enseñanza del lenguaje utilizado metafóricamente; y otra de la preparación para enseñar metáfora.

El título del siguiente manuscrito es Commodity, Immunity, and Struggle: (Re)visiting Senses of Community in ELT. En él, Julia Zoraida Posada Ortiz y Harold Castañeda Peña muestran cómo las autobiografías de cuatro profesores en formación de lengua inglesa dan cuenta de una «constelación de comunidades de miedo», entre las que se encuentran el programa de formación docente y la práctica docente. La noción de la comunidad que se discute principalmente en el artículo y que tiene implicaciones para ELT es «comunidad como mercancía, como inmunidad y como lucha».

El siguiente artículo es Teacher and Portfolio in the Consolidation of an Assessment-as-learning Culture del autor Edgar Picón-Jácome. En este texto, hay un informe de estudio de caso sobre la implementación de una alternativa de evaluación llamado portafolio de evaluación. El autor muestra una discusión de aspectos como la mediación de las TIC en la resolución de problemas de practicidad por parte de los docentes participantes a la hora de retroalimentar tanto el proceso como el producto.

El manuscrito que viene a continuación y cuyo título es Pair Research Tasks: Promoting Educational Research with PreService Teachers que fue escrito por Eulices Córdoba Zúñiga, Isabel Cristina Zuleta Vásquez y Uriel Moreno Moreno. Los autores muestran su principal interés en la escritura del desarrollo de tareas de investigación teórico-prácticas de trabajo en pareja de futuros profesores de inglés. Un grupo de veinte profesores en formación participó en un estudio exploratorio. Se informa que esos participantes aprendieron diferentes cosas que los llevaron a redactar una propuesta de investigación.

En el artículo titulado Critical Pedagogy Trends in English Language Teaching, sus autoras, Brenda Portilla Quintero y Jennifer Herrera Molina, discuten la inclusión de la pedagogía crítica en ELT a partir de una revisión de la literatura. Informan que esta se realiza a través de bases de datos especializadas de publicaciones tanto colombianas como extranjeras. Como parte de los hallazgos, las autoras sostienen que la Pedagogía Crítica en ELT es una tendencia emergente en aquellos países con desigualdad permanente.

El artículo que sigue se titula Bombast Bombardment and Dense Syntax versus Effective Communication and Language Teaching in ESL Settings. Nigeria English Examples escrito por Omowumi Olabode Steven Ekundayo. Este manuscrito informa sobre los factores sociolingüísticos, históricos e idiosincrásicos que influyen en el hábito lingüístico de algunos hablantes de inglés nigerianos educados de utilizar expresiones rimbombantes y estructuras sintácticas complejas. El artículo también explica las implicaciones de tal hábito para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje del inglés en contextos de inglés como segundo idioma (ESL).

El último manuscrito de esta edición del CALJ se titula Decolonizing English Language Teaching in Colombia: Epistemological Perspectives and Discursive Alternatives por Yamith José Fandiño-Parra. En este texto, hay un llamado que hace el autor para descolonizar ELT en Colombia. Ese llamado está motivado por una revisión de estudios sobre colonialismo y descolonialidad. El artículo también muestra una discusión de la tensión entre el norte global y el sur global en relación con ELT y una propuesta para resistir el dominio epistémico y cultural a través de discursos locales alternativos.

Para concluir, tanto el CALJ como la Maestría en Lingüística Aplicada a ELT están comprometidos con la creación de oportunidades para que los profesores e investigadores de inglés crezcan como actores y autores de sus propias experiencias pedagógicas y de investigación. La creación de esas oportunidades seguirá siendo formada por una sensibilidad hacia los problemas sociales, culturales y políticos de ELT. En definitiva, de esto se trata la dimensión crítica de la educación lingüística.

References

Davies, A. & Elder. C. (2004). The Handbook of Applied Linguistics. Blackwell Publishing.

Grabe, W. & Kaplan, R. (1992). Introduction to Applied Linguistics. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. Pennycook, A. (2001). Critical Applied Linguistics: A (Critical) Introduction. Lawrence Erlbaum.

Pennycook, A. (2001). Critical Applied Linguistics: A (Critical) Introduction. Lawrence Erlbaum.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...