English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives

La enseñanza de la lengua inglesa en tiempos de cambios y la relevancia de mantener una mirada fina hacia perspectivas críticas

Authors

  • Ximena Bonilla Medina Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6625-501X
  • Alvaro Hernan Quintero Polo Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas

Keywords:

Pandemic, Post-Pandemic (en).

Keywords:

Pandemia, Post-Pandemia (es).

Author Biographies

Ximena Bonilla Medina, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas

S. Ximena Bonilla Medina is a Doctor of education from the University of East London. She also holds a M.A in applied linguistics for TEFL from Francisco Jose de Caldas Distrital University and a BA in Spanish-English from Pedagógica University. She is currently the director of the Language Institute at Distrital University, a professor and researcher of the same university. She is a member of the research group ESTUPOLI and director of the “semillero”: second language teaching and learning, culture and social justice. Her research interests are: race, interculturality, teacher education and technology within a humanistic approach in language teaching.

Alvaro Hernan Quintero Polo, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas

Licenciado en Idiomas Inglés y español por la Universidad de Nariño, Magíster en Lingüística Aplicada a la Enseñanza del Inglés por la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, Doctor en Educación por la Universidad Santo Tomás. Profesor de la Facultad de Ciencias y Educación de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas. Miembro del grupo de investigación: Estudios Críticos de Políticas Educativas Colombianas. Ha sido profesor en programas TEFL de pregrado y posgrado de diferentes universidades colombianas. Es codirector del grupo de investigación Estudios Críticos de Políticas Educativas Colombianas. Sus intereses de investigación son: el análisis del discurso, la pedagogía del lenguaje y la evaluación curricular

References

Al-Jarf, R. (2022). Online vocabulary tasks for engaging and motivating EFL college students in distance learning during the pandemic and post-pandemic. International Journal of English Language Studies (IJELS), 4(1), 14-24. https://doi.org/10.32996/ijels.2022.4.1.2 DOI: https://doi.org/10.32996/ijels.2022.4.1.2

Altam, S. (2020). Influence of social media on EFL Yemeni learners in Indian universities during Covid-19 Pandemic. Linguistics and Culture Review, 4(1), 35-47. https://doi.org/10.37028/lingcure.v4n1.19 DOI: https://doi.org/10.21744/lingcure.v4n1.19

Atmojo, A. E. P., & Nugroho, A. (2020). EFL classes must go online! Teaching activities and challenges during COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. Register Journal, 13(1), 49-76. https://doi.org/10.18326/rgt.v13i1.49-76 DOI: https://doi.org/10.18326/rgt.v13i1.49-76

Bonilla-Medina, S. X, & Quintero-Polo, A. (2021). Editorial: Signs of EFL resistance to critical times. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 23(1), 18331. https://geox.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18331/17282

Fairclough, N. (1992). Discourse and social change. Polity Press.

Farrell, T. S., & Stanclik, C. (2021). “COVID-19 is an Opportunity to Rediscover Ourselves”: Reflections of a Novice EFL Teacher in Central America. RELC Journal, 0033688220981778. https://doi.org/10.1177/0033688220981778 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0033688220981778

Keshavarz, M. H. (2020). A Proposed Model for Post-Pandemic Higher Education. Budapest International Research and Critics in Linguistics and Education Journal, 3(3), 1384-1391. https://doi.org/10.33258/birle.v3i3.1193 DOI: https://doi.org/10.33258/birle.v3i3.1193

Lase, D., Zega, T. G. C., & Daeli, D. O. (2021). Parents' perceptions of distance learning during Covid-19 pandemic in rural Indonesia. Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn), 16(1), 103-113. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3890610 DOI: https://doi.org/10.11591/edulearn.v16i1.20122

Mahyoob, M. (2020). Challenges of e-Learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic experienced by EFL Learners. Arab World English Journal, 11(4), 351-362. https://doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol11no4.23 DOI: https://doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol11no4.23

Munni, B. E., & Hasan, S. M. (2020). Teaching English during COVID-19 pandemic using Facebook group as an LMS: a study on undergraduate students of a university in Bangladesh. Language in India, 20(6), 76-94. http://www.languageinindia.com/june2020/benazirenglishcovidbangladeshfacebookeducation1.pdf

Niño, G. K. D. (2022). Memes en la enseñanza intercultural de la lengua italiana [Tesis inédita de maestría, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas].

Norton, B. (2000). Identity and language learning. Extending the conversation. De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.21832/9781783090563 DOI: https://doi.org/10.21832/9781783090563

Universidad Autónoma de México (UNAM). (2020, 17 de agosto). Quién está ganando y quien está perdiendo [Nota de radio]. Prisma R1. https://www.arcus-global.com/wp/quien-gano-y-perdio-en-la-construccion-por-la-pandemia/

Wetherell, M., & Potter, J. (1992). Mapping the language of racism. Harvester Wheatsheaf.

How to Cite

APA

Bonilla Medina, X., & Quintero Polo, A. H. (2022). English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 24(1), 1–5. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.19301

ACM

[1]
Bonilla Medina, X. and Quintero Polo, A.H. 2022. English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal. 24, 1 (May 2022), 1–5. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.19301.

ACS

(1)
Bonilla Medina, X.; Quintero Polo, A. H. English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives. Colomb. appl. linguist. j 2022, 24, 1-5.

ABNT

BONILLA MEDINA, X.; QUINTERO POLO, A. H. English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, [S. l.], v. 24, n. 1, p. 1–5, 2022. DOI: 10.14483/22487085.19301. Disponível em: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/19301. Acesso em: 3 dec. 2022.

Chicago

Bonilla Medina, Ximena, and Alvaro Hernan Quintero Polo. 2022. “English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 24 (1):1-5. https://doi.org/10.14483/22487085.19301.

Harvard

Bonilla Medina, X. and Quintero Polo, A. H. (2022) “English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives”, Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 24(1), pp. 1–5. doi: 10.14483/22487085.19301.

IEEE

[1]
X. Bonilla Medina and A. H. Quintero Polo, “English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives”, Colomb. appl. linguist. j, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 1–5, May 2022.

MLA

Bonilla Medina, X., and A. H. Quintero Polo. “English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, vol. 24, no. 1, May 2022, pp. 1-5, doi:10.14483/22487085.19301.

Turabian

Bonilla Medina, Ximena, and Alvaro Hernan Quintero Polo. “English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives”. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal 24, no. 1 (May 10, 2022): 1–5. Accessed December 3, 2022. https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/19301.

Vancouver

1.
Bonilla Medina X, Quintero Polo AH. English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives. Colomb. appl. linguist. j [Internet]. 2022May10 [cited 2022Dec.3];24(1):1-5. Available from: https://revistas.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/19301

Download Citation

Visitas

173

Dimensions


PlumX


Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

English Language Teaching in Times of Change and the Relevance of Maintaining a Clear View on Critical Perspectives

The world is continuously moving and facing diverse changes that result in social, cultural, economic, and political transformations. Sometimes, those changes are unnoticeable, but, other times, they represent abrupt and sudden changes. An example of one of those changes, which came in an untimely fashion, is the global health emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Through this journal’s lens, as observers of world affairs, we witnessed teachers and researchers’ efforts to face the challenging situations arising from that scenario, as well as the way in which these works represent traces of resistance in difficult times ( Bonilla and Quintero, 2021 ). Curious about the direction that English language teaching research was taking, and going beyond the scope of this journal, we identified that the concerns in general education overlapped the issues of the pandemic and the need to understand these problems together with the role of technology. In this sense, we also realized that English language teaching was in line with that landscape, where proposals in the same direction were reflected and developed. In other words, the health crisis was a period in which English language teaching took interest in online education, virtual interaction, and distance and remote education (see Farrell and Stanclik, 2021. Mahyoob, 2020. Atmojo and Nugroho, 2020 ). There was also interest in the acquisition of capabilities which could be expanded through digital apps such as WhatsApp or Facebook (see Al-Jarf, 2022. Munni and Hasan, 2020 ) or in the management of virtual platforms such as Zoom, Google Meet, and other live-streaming services (see Keshavarz, 2020 ). These devices illustrate how educational interest focused on digital competence and e-learning.

Within understanding the digital environment, the discussion on teaching and learning also focused on highlighting autonomous learning as a relevant issue to approach education in current times ( Keshavarz, 2020 ), just as interests were centered on seeing how students could be producers of content ( Niño, 2022 ). During said studies, some queries emerged on assessing the time and quality of exposure to online materials ( Altam, 2020 ); on how assessment could correlate the new forms of the teaching-learning process; on the acceptance of students and teachers with these new methodologies; and on also evaluating the effect that those approaches to education had on the actors’ emotions. To summarize, the many issues cited in the authors’ wonderings seem to be generally enumerating the challenges and opportunities that the situation had brought ( Atmojo and Nugroho, 2020 ).

All these reflections certainly brought important advances for the field of English language teaching and general education; we became aware of the multiple resources that technology can provide, which remained unexplored due to lack of knowledge. However, that situation also caused uncertainties about the future direction of education once the pandemic is over. Despite the difficulties that we all had while responding to to that abrupt change, by government decision, we turned from 100% online interaction to 100% face-to-face education this year, expecting teachers to be ready to cope with this new stage.

There are still many questions. For example, what was gained and what was lost in this pandemic? Surely the gains are on the side of technological knowledge, as it has been reported by the multiple studies –some of them cited above and also present in this volume of the journal– and probably on the interest in approaching school practices that integrate parents in students’ learning ( Lase and Daeli, 2021 ). But what has been lost? What is happening within the current transition? How are the post-pandemic relationships between students, teachers, and general educational actors in general? How much have educational settings and life in general changed after all this?

Unlike what happened during the pandemic, in which publications analyzed the experienced situations, the post-pandemic stage does not seem to have had an impact on the explosion that caused this level of interest. It is striking to see that postpandemic publications are much fewer, and the ones that do emerge appear to maintain their attention on technology –just in the same direction it had during the hardest times of the pandemic. Therefore, it is most probably necessary to recall the need to have a social and cultural view of language teaching, so that we do not lose ourselves in the instructional and instrumental issues of language while there are broader areas that should be part of our educational concern. As Weedon (1997) said, “language is the place where actual and possible forms of social organization and their likely social and political consequences are defined and contested. Yet it is also the place where our sense of ourselves, our subjectivity, is constructed” (p. 21, as cited in Norton, 2000 ). This is why it is necessary to see how we are integrated in the world and how language plays a role for individuals to provide meaning to that world.

According to the previous idea, it is important to contemplate the many social events that have transformed our lives in postpandemic times, not only at an educational level. Some of them, as reported by UNAM (2020) , include increased online sales, which have changed people’s rhythm of life and even mobility and their relationships. Other changes have taken place with regard to certain activities that people now do more frequently. For instance, people have dedicated more time to watching television, to online platforms for film consumption, to takeaway food purchases, and to online payment. From a broader perspective, the growth of multinational and large telecommunications enterprises varied; they increased their capital, whereas other companies (usually poor or small enterprises) lost theirs. The process leading some companies to be part of the latter is a deep economic transformation. It is also necessary to mention the situation created by financial entities, which offered help to people in debt and have done nothing but increase their debts, even leading them to bankruptcy.

All the social concerns mentioned in the previous paragraph constitute enriching areas to situate the language in a social perspective and, more importantly, in a critical view, a view that, as teachers, we can use to make language more vivid and real. Following Fairclough (1992) , studying language implies seeing it as a social practice, that is, paying attention to its social dimensions, “to issues of concern in social analysis such as the institutional and organizational circumstances of the discursive event[s] and how that shapes the nature of the discursive practice[s], and the constitutive/constructive effects of discourse” (p. 4.). In this sense, building upon Weedon’s ideas (1997, as cited in Norton, 2000 ), language is the bridge to connect individuals with society and bind them to it by involving them in the analysis of social reality. It is true that face-to-face interaction vs. online learning was of great concern, but we must pay attention to societal problems and their transformation, which, in the end, constitutes our main goal as educators. This is why we call for fostering social sensitivity, in order for language to serve as a view of society ( Wetherell and Potter, 1992 ). This premise leads us to see how society reproduces imaginaries and boundaries hidden in language. This also implies the need for critical actors who are aware of normalized structures and categories that reproduce inequality.

Thus, critical views of language acquire strategic importance, given that they provide us with an awareness of the particularities of our context –our context as Latin-Americans, as Colombians– and the implications that this brings to learning new languages such as English. It is also important to be aware of the way in which conflict in the world affects us and others and how we cannot ignore them (for example, the war between Ukraine and Russia). English teacher sensitization broadens our view of how emotions derived from those conflicts play a role in our lives. In this vein, we emphasize the need to preserve critical perspectives on language teaching and learning, which now have been more popularly spread through decolonial perspectives, critical pedagogy, and post-structural views of language and teaching, to name a few. These views are not separated from the social reality that they seek to transform, and they aim to achieve a more inclusive and open society. We believe that those views maintain our critical mindset to sharply look at our exercise of language teaching and research, so that our professional work remains committed to social needs.

In this journal number, we acknowledge the authors’ expressed interest in understanding the multiple dimensions of language teaching and learning, and we appreciate the effort they make to integrate a view on social issues in their language perspectives. Onyema explores the perception of teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) towards morphological movement in the meaning of texts. Papadima and Herrera-Mosquera et al. present an approach to the way in which assessment should be carried out, broadening their view to see it from other perspectives beyond the traditional ones, this time from the viewpoint of learners from a public university. In line with the issue of the pandemic and expanding this knowledge, Quitián-Bernal and González-Martínez explore the world of technology and provide a view of autonomous learning promoted by video sharing and the benefits of blended learning as educational tools. Ortiz-López explicitly discusses how English learning from a critical perspective could also be the means for learners to construct and reshape their habitus. Mede and Budak inquire about the role of emotions in language learning and their relationship with the process. Finally, we have Castañeda-Trujillo et al., who contribute with two innovative perspectives language teacher identity: from the view of teachers’ professional development and from a gender perspective.

La enseñanza de la lengua inglesa en tiempos de cambios y la relevancia de mantener una mirada fina hacia perspectivas críticas

El mundo está en constante movimiento y enfrentando diversos cambios que derivan en transformaciones sociales, culturales, económicas y políticas. En algunas ocasiones, esas alteraciones pasan desapercibidas, pero, en otras ocasiones, representan cambios repentinos y abruptos. Un ejemplo de cómo uno de esos cambios se produjo de manera intempestiva es la emergencia sanitaria mundial debido a la pandemia del COVID-19. Desde la revista, como observadores de los asuntos mundiales, fuimos testigos de los esfuerzos de profesores e investigadores para enfrentar las desafiantes situaciones que emergieron de ese nuevo escenario, así como de la manera en que esos trabajos representan huellas de resistencia en tiempos difíciles ( Bonilla and Quintero, 2021 ). Curiosos por la dirección que estaba tomando la investigación de la enseñanza de la lengua inglesa, y cruzando las fronteras de la revista, identificamos que las preocupaciones en la educación en general se solapaban con los temas de la pandemia y la necesidad de ver estos problemas en conjunto con el papel tecnología. En este sentido, nos dimos cuenta de que la enseñanza de la lengua inglesa estaba alineada con ese panorama, en el cual se reflejaron y se desarrollaron propuestas en la misma dirección. En otras palabras, la crisis sanitaria fue un período en el que la enseñanza de la lengua inglesa se interesó por la educación en línea, la interacción virtual y la educación a distancia y remota (véase Farrell and Stanclik, 2021. Mahyoob, 2020. Atmojo and Nugroho, 2020 ). También hubo interés por la adquisición de capacidades que pueden ser expandidas a través de aplicaciones digitales como WhatsApp o Facebook (véase Al-Jarf, 2022. Munni and Hasan, 2020 ) o en la gestión de plataformas virtuales como Zoom, Google Meet y demás servicios de transmisión en vivo (véase Keshavarz, 2020 ). Estos dispositivos ilustran cómo el interés educativo se centró en la competencia digital y el e-learning.

Dentro de la comprensión del entorno digital, el debate sobre la enseñanza y el aprendizaje también se centró en destacar el aprendizaje autónomo como un tema relevante para abordar la educación en la actualidad ( Keshavarz, 2020 ), de la misma manera en que se centró el interés en ver cómo los estudiantes pueden convertirse en productores de contenidos ( Niño, 2022 ). Durante dichas investigaciones surgieron dudas sobre la evaluación del tiempo y la calidad de la exposición al material en línea ( Altam, 2020 ); sobre cómo la evaluación podría correlacionar las nuevas formas del proceso de enseñanzaaprendizaje; sobre la aceptación de estudiantes y profesores con estas nuevas metodologías; y sobre la evaluación también del efecto que esos enfoques de la educación tenían sobre las emociones de los actores. En resumen, los muchos temas citados en las preguntas de los autores parecen enumerar de manera general los desafíos y oportunidades que la situación había traído ( Atmojo and Nugroho, 2020 ).

Todas estas reflexiones trajeron un avance importante para el campo de la enseñanza de la lengua inglesa y la educación en general. Allí nos dimos cuenta de los múltiples recursos que la tecnología puede proporcionar, los cuales no habían sido explorados por falta de conocimiento. Sin embargo, esa situación también genera incertidumbre acerca de la futura orientación de la educación una vez acabe la pandemia. A pesar de las dificultades que todos tuvimos para responder a ese cambio abrupto, por decisión del gobierno, pasamos de un 100 % de interacción en línea a un 100 % de educación presencial este año, esperando que los maestros estuvieran listos para hacer frente a esta nueva etapa.

Por el momento hay muchas preguntas. Por ejemplo, ¿qué se ganó y qué se perdió en esta pandemia? Seguramente los avances están del lado del conocimiento tecnológico, como lo han reportado los múltiples estudios –algunos de ellos citados anteriormente y presentes en este número de la revista– y probablemente también del interés por acercarse a las prácticas escolares que integren a los padres en el aprendizaje de los alumnos ( Lase and Daeli, 2021 ). No obstante, ¿qué se ha perdido?, ¿qué está ocurriendo en la actual situación de transición?, ¿cómo son las relaciones postpandemia entre estudiantes, profesores y actores de la educación en general?, ¿cuánto ha cambiado el entorno educativo y la vida en general después de todo esto?

A diferencia de lo ocurrido durante la pandemia, en la que abundaban las publicaciones sobre el análisis de la situación vivida, la etapa postpandémica no parece haber tenido un impacto en la explosión que provocó este nivel de interés. Llama la atención, por ejemplo, que las publicaciones postpandémicas son muchas menos, y las que se muestran parecen mantener la atención en la tecnología –justo en la misma dirección que tuvo durante los momentos más duros de la pandemia. Por lo tanto, lo más probable es que sea necesario recordar la necesidad de tener una visión social y cultural de la enseñanza de idiomas para que no nos perdamos en las cuestiones didácticas e instrumentales del idioma, cuando hay áreas más amplias que deberían formar parte de nuestra preocupación educativa. Como bien dijo Weedon (1997), “el lenguaje es el lugar donde se definen y cuestionan las formas reales y posibles de organización social y sus posibles consecuencias sociales y políticas. Sin embargo, también es el lugar donde se construye el sentido de nosotros mismos, nuestra subjetividad” (p. 21 citado en Norton, 2000 ). Por esa razón, es necesario ver cómo estamos integrados en el mundo y cómo el lenguaje desempeña un papel para que las personas den sentido a ese mundo.

De acuerdo con el pensamiento anterior, es importante contemplar los múltiples acontecimientos sociales que han transformado nuestras vidas en la postpandemia, no solo a nivel educativo. Algunos de ellos, según informa la UNAM (2020) , incluyen el aumento de las ventas online, que han cambiado el ritmo de vida de las personas e incluso la movilidad y sus relaciones. Otros cambios se dieron en cuanto a ciertas actividades que las personas realizan ahora con mayor frecuencia. Por ejemplo, la gente se ha dedicado más tiempo a ver televisión, al uso de las plataformas en línea para el consumo de películas, a la compra de alimentos y al pago en línea. Desde una perspectiva más amplia, varió el crecimiento de multinacionales y grandes empresas de telecomunicaciones, que hicieron crecer su capital, mientras que otras empresas (generalmente pobres o pequeñas empresas) perdieron el suyo. El proceso que llevó a algunas empresas a formar parte de este último grupo es una fuerte transformación en la economía. También se hace necesario mencionar la situación creada por las entidades financieras que ofrecieron ayuda a personas endeudadas y que no han hecho más que aumentar sus deudas, llevándolas incluso a la quiebra.

Todas las preocupaciones sociales mencionadas en el párrafo anterior constituyen áreas enriquecedoras para situar el lenguaje en una perspectiva social y, más importante, en una visión crítica, una visión que, como profesores, podemos utilizar para hacer que el lenguaje sea vivo y real. Siguiendo a Fairclough (1992) , estudiar el lenguaje implica verlo como una práctica social, es decir, atender a sus dimensiones sociales del lenguaje, “a las cuestiones de interés en el análisis social como las circunstancias institucionales y organizativas del evento discursivo y cómo esto configura la naturaleza de la práctica discursiva y los efectos constitutivos/constructivos del discurso” (p. 4.). En este sentido, y basándonos en las ideas de Weedon (1997, citado en Norton, 2000 ), el lenguaje es el puente para conectar a los individuos con la sociedad y unirlos a ella al involucrarlos en el análisis de la realidad social. Es cierto que la interacción presencial frente al aprendizaje en línea fue de gran preocupación, pero debemos estar atentos a los problemas sociales y a su transformación, lo cual, a fin de cuentas, constituye nuestro principal objetivo como educadores. Por ello, aclamamos por que se fomente la sensibilidad social para que el lenguaje funcione como una visión de la sociedad ( Wetherell and Potter, 1992 ). Esta premisa nos lleva a ver cómo la sociedad reproduce imaginarios y límites ocultos en el lenguaje. Esto también implica la necesidad de tener actores críticos que sean conscientes de estructuras y categorías normalizadas que reproducen la desigualdad.

Así pues, las visiones críticas del lenguaje adquieren importancia estratégica, pues nos brindan conciencia sobre las particularidades de nuestro contexto –nuestro contexto como latinoamericanos, como colombianos– y las implicaciones que esto trae al aprendizaje de nuevos idiomas, entre ellos el inglés. También es importante ser conscientes de la forma en que los conflictos en el mundo nos afectan a nosotros y a los demás y de cómo no podemos ignorarlos (por ejemplo, la guerra entre Rusia y Ucrania). La sensibilización de los profesores de inglés amplía nuestra visión de cómo las emociones derivadas de esos conflictos juegan un papel en nuestras vidas. En este sentido, hacemos hincapié en la necesidad de preservar las visiones críticas de la enseñanza y el aprendizaje de idiomas, que ahora se han difundido más popularmente a través de las perspectivas decoloniales, la pedagogía crítica y las visiones post-estructurales del lenguaje y de la enseñanza, por citar algunas. Estas visiones no están desvinculadas de la realidad social que buscan transformar y pretenden alcanzar una sociedad más abierta e inclusiva. Consideramos que esas visiones mantienen nuestra mente crítica para mirar con nitidez nuestro ejercicio de enseñanza e investigación de idiomas, de manera que nuestro trabajo profesional esté comprometido con las necesidades sociales.

En este número de la revista reconocemos el interés expresado por los autores en comprender las múltiples dimensiones de la enseñanza y el aprendizaje de idiomas, y apreciamos el esfuerzo que realizan los investigadores para integrar una visión de lo social en sus visiones lingüísticas. Onyema explora la percepción de los profesores de enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera EFL hacia el movimiento morfológico en el significado de los textos. Papadima y Herrera-Mosquera et al. presentan una aproximación a la forma de evaluar abriendo su mirada para verla desde otras perspectivas más allá de las tradicionales, esta vez desde el punto de vista de los estudiantes y de los estudiantes de una universidad pública. A tono con el asunto de la pandemia y ampliando este conocimiento, Quitián-Bernal y González-Martínez exploran el mundo de la tecnología y ofrecen una visión del aprendizaje autónomo promovido por el intercambio de videos y los beneficios del aprendizaje mixto como herramientas educativas. Ortíz-López discute explícitamente cómo el aprendizaje del inglés desde una perspectiva crítica también podría ser el medio para que los estudiantes construyeran y remodelaran su habitus. Mede y Budak se preguntan por el papel de las emociones en el aprendizaje de idiomas y su relación con el proceso. Por último, tenemos a Castañeda-Trujillo et al., que contribuyen a dar dos miradas innovadoras a la identidad de los profesores de idiomas: desde la perspectiva del desarrollo profesional de los profesores y desde la perspectiva de género.

References

Al-Jarf, R. (2022). Online vocabulary tasks for engaging and motivating EFL college students in distance learning during the pandemic and post-pandemic. International Journal of English Language Studies (IJELS), 4(1), 14-24. https://doi.org/10.32996/ijels.2022.4.1.2

Altam, S. (2020). Influence of social media on EFL Yemeni learners in Indian universities during Covid-19 Pandemic. Linguistics and Culture Review, 4(1), 35-47. https://doi.org/10.37028/lingcure.v4n1.19 [Link]

Atmojo, A. E. P., & Nugroho, A. (2020). EFL classes must go online! Teaching activities and challenges during COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. Register Journal, 13(1), 49-76. https://doi.org/10.18326/rgt.v13i1.49-76 [Link]

Bonilla-Medina, S. X, & Quintero-Polo, A. (2021). Editorial: Signs of EFL resistance to critical times. Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal, 23(1), 18331. https://geox.udistrital.edu.co/index.php/calj/article/view/18331/17282 [Link]

Fairclough, N. (1992). Discourse and social change. Polity Press.

Farrell, T. S., & Stanclik, C. (2021). “COVID-19 is an Opportunity to Rediscover Ourselves”: Reflections of a Novice EFL Teacher in Central America. RELC Journal, 0033688220981778. https://doi.org/10.1177/0033688220981778 [Link]

Keshavarz, M. H. (2020). A Proposed Model for Post-Pandemic Higher Education. Budapest International Research and Critics in Linguistics and Education Journal, 3(3), 1384-1391. https://doi.org/10.33258/birle.v3i3.1193 [Link]

Lase, D., Zega, T. G. C., & Daeli, D. O. (2021). Parents' perceptions of distance learning during Covid-19 pandemic in rural Indonesia. Journal of Education and Learning (EduLearn), 16(1), 103-113. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3890610 [Link]

Mahyoob, M. (2020). Challenges of e-Learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic experienced by EFL Learners. Arab World English Journal, 11(4), 351-362. https://doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol11no4.23 [Link]

Munni, B. E., & Hasan, S. M. (2020). Teaching English during COVID-19 pandemic using Facebook group as an LMS: a study on undergraduate students of a university in Bangladesh. Language in India, 20(6), 76-94. http://www.languageinindia.com/june2020/benazirenglishcovidbangladeshfacebookeducation1.pdf [Link]

Niño, G. K. D. (2022). Memes en la enseñanza intercultural de la lengua italiana [Unpublished master’s thesis, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas].

Norton, B. (2000). Identity and language learning. Extending the conversation. De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.21832/9781783090563 [Link]

Universidad Autónoma de México (UNAM). (2020, August 17). Quién está ganando y quien está perdiendo [Radio broadcast]. Prisma R1. https://www.arcus-global.com/wp/quien-gano-y-perdio-en-la-construccion-por-la-pandemia/[Link]

Wetherell, M., & Potter, J. (1992). Mapping the language of racism. Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...